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Construction Technology
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choices/Fill in the Blanks & short notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Excavation carried out for construction of individual foundation and trenches is- :
a. Sloped excavation
b. Bulk excavation
c. Confined excavation
d. Excavation in rocks
2. Which of the following is not the temporary exclusion of controlling ground water?
a. Sump pumping
b. Cofferdams
c. caissons
d. Well point system
3. Strength, water-tightness, abrasion resistance are the properties of-:
a. Plastic concrete
b. Hardened concrete
c. Both a & b
d. None of these
4. The welding which is not suited for fabrication work known as-
a. Fusion welding
b. Friction welding
c. Flame welding
d. Metal arc welding
5. The most common heat sources used in industrial welding works are-
a. Electric welding
b. Resistance heating at an interface
c. Flame welding
d. All of the above
6. Silicone-based paint may be applied to porous surface to prevent water penetrating the wall known as-:
a. Fungicides paint
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b. Water-repellent paint
c. Waterproofing paint
d. Heat-resisting paint
7. Which one of the following provides color to painting films?
a. Binder
b. Pigments
c. solvent
d. Additive
8. __________masonry composed of rectangular unit , usually larger in size than bricks and properly bonded having sawed, dressed, or squared beds- laid in mortar :
a. Rubble masonry
b. Ashlars masonry
c. Block-in-course masonry
d. Grouted masonry
9. RCC stands for _______________________________.
10. WMM stands for __________________________________.
Part Two:
1. What are the causes of accident at construction sites?
2. List the document required for actual project implementation.
3. What are the activities involved in plastering?
4. List the guidelines for storage of civil engineering construction material.
Section B: Caselets (40 Marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
The president rise in commodity prices across the board, s posing major threat to those working on construction projects, in general and real estate projects, in particular. The prices of raw material are it
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Construction Management
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cement, steel, aluminum, plastics, etc., are seeing an upward rally. This can hamper the growth of the sector adversely in case the demand for these projects, worth crores of rupees, falls. The impact of this fall would be severe on country’s infrastructure development as well as the growth of the manufacturing sector. This lurking risk is not restricted only to domestic sector but is gaining global attention. Globally too project managers are concerned as commodity prices shoot through the roof. In addition to the problem of cost overrun, KPMG’s Global Construction Survey conducted in the year 2007 unraveled three major aspects of the construction sector; Current business trends, management of building process and the future. The findings revealed that the shortage of qualified contractors to bid for and execute major projects, the rising cost of construction and the shortage of internal resources available to manage and deliver projects are the biggest challenges to new construction projects in the future. These need to be addressed as demand for construction services shall increase over the next five years.
Considering India’s embarkment towards major construction projects related to highways, ports, airways, several lessons are required to be learned from international experiences and also from its own past experiences. According to Business Line, as of the end-March 2007, the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) had about 46 constructions works-amounting to a total length of 1,844 km- which were plagued by time and cost overruns. Of these, three projects, which were cancelled due to non-performance of contractors, were not rewarded while others faced significant time overruns. Some common problems identified were delay on account of land acquisition, utilities clearance, bad quality Detailed Project Report (DPR), leading to massive change in scope of work after the project was awarded and non-performing contractors. To overcome these problems attempts have been made by HHAI such as, the new model concession agreement includes clauses to ensure that 60% land acquisition and utilities clearance are done by NHAI and passed on to the rod developer before the financial closure of the project. Additionally, the clauses also have provision of blacklisting consulting firms as well as imposing penalty on DPR consultants to ensure better performance. The intervention by IT sector can also help the construction sector in reducing the performance. The intervention by IT sector can also help the construction sector in reducing the man-managed deficiencies that contribute to cost and time overruns, if not eliminating it in entirely.
Questions:
1. The cost-effective construction technologies would emerge as the most acceptable case of sustainable technologies in India. Comment
2. Explain what lessons are required to be learned from International experiences and its own past experiences in construction project.
Caselet 2
The Euro Tunnel formerly known as Channel Tunnel project was conceived for over two centuries. However, it was in April 2, 1985, a formal invitation to complete the fixed link of it was floated by the British and the French. Thereafter, in January, 1986, the train/shuttle tunnel developed by the consortium channel Tunnel Group Limited-France-Manche S.A. (CTGFM) was ultimately given the contract. In the development of it, design engineering was the prime challenge. The challenge was overcome through construction of three concrete lined parallel tunnels of approximately 50 kilometers long running mostly undersea (about 38 Km) from the English and French ends. Of these, the two outside tunnels which are used as rail tunnels had a diameter (internal) of 7.6 meters for train movement. These rail tunnels were dug at an average distance of 30 meters. The other one, the central tunnel has an internal diameter of 4.8 meters for catering to servicing activities. For effectuating it, the service tunnel is linked with the rail
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tunnels through cross-passages along the entire stretch, at equal intervals of 375 meters. Besides, the rail tunnels were also connected with ducts of piston relief at intervals of 250 meters for maintenance of air pressure, which got affected by movement of high-speed trains, in the two tunnels. Also, two huge undersea crossover caverns were constructed for the trains to crossover from one track to other. In order to keep the tunnels dry, five pumping stations and sumps were built. So as to reduce the heat caused by friction caused by the fast-moving trains, a cooling system was installed in which chilled water was pumped by cooling pipes. After determination of the optimum tunnel route, Tunnel Boring Machines (TBMs) that are able to operate in a sealed mode under water pressure were used. Lining of the tunnels were done with pre-cast concrete segmented rings and ductile iron as per soil conditions so as to ensure a 120 year life. The concrete used in the tunnel construction are of high strength and density so as to give optimum corrosion protection to the steel reinforcement. Besides, secondary protection against corrosion was ensured through surface coating.
Questions:
1. Explain the construction of the ‘Euro Tunnel’.
2. State the benefits of the construction of the ‘Euro Tunnel’.
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should from the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Define “Glazing”, Explain different kind of glasses used for glazing purpose?
2. What is meant by mechanical handling? List the important safety guidelines for mechanical handling.
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION C
Examination Paper of Construction Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Project Management in Construction
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice questions & short note type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. It included manpower, material and machinery that is necessary to perform the work:
a. Scope
b. Quality
c. Resources
d. Completion time
2. In this analysis a project is formulated and appraised based on the estimates generated from past data, experience & analysis.
a. Risk analysis
b. Sensitivity analysis
c. Probability analysis
d. Economic analysis
3. It is a verbal written or on-line document that shows the up-to-date performance status of a task that has been entrusted to a responsibility/accounting centre.
a. Trends forecasting
b. Reporting performance
c. Performance variance analysis
d. Recording performance
4. In this contract, the architectural and engineering design and drawings are provided by the employer/client to the contractor at the time of tendering as a part of the contract documents:
a. Build-only contracts
b. Build-own transfer contracts
c. Engineering procurement
d. Construction contract
5. These arise where no ground exists either in the contract or in common law:
a. Contractual claims
b. Extra contractual claims
c. Ex-gratia claims
d. None of the above
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6. In this case, both the parties willingly discuss the dispute and arrive at a settlement without the intervention of any third party:
a. Conciliation through negotiations
b. Conciliation through mediation
c. Conciliation by setting up ‘Dispute Review Board’ (DRB)
d. Conciliation through others
7. The claim which is registered by giving a notice is known as:
a. Registering claims
b. Establishing claims
c. Presentation claims
d. None of the above
8. This term covers the entire electronic and electro-mechanical equipment used in the computerized data processing system:
a. Hardware
b. Software
c. Operators
d. Procedure
9. This enables the electronic transfer of a complete file from one computer to another:
a. Internet
b. Intranets
c. telnet
d. File transfer protocol (FTP)
10. It is an assurance to the owner that selected the contractor will actually proceed with the contract
at the bid price:
a. performance bonds
b. Bid bonds
c. Claim bonds
d. Contract bonds
Part Two:
1. What are the main causes of a project failure?
2. What is ‘Responsibility assignment Matrix’ (RAM) chart?
3. Define professional construction management (PCM) approach.
4. Differentiate between ‘Project Management’ & ‘General Management’.
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Construction Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 Marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Huge Electronics Company (HEC) is a designer and manufacturer of electronics equipment that is sold primarily to government/military customers. Located in the Western United States, HEC grew rapidly in the 1970s to become one of the nation’s largest government contractors with employees in excess of 50,000. Partly because of HEC’s rapid growth, the company organization chart was constantly in a state of flux. Despite the changes, the engineering divisions remained fairly stable in a classic project management structure. The manufacturing division was structured in a matrix organization because of the large investments in manufacturing equipment necessary. Duplicating these equipment purchases for every project would not be cost effective.
Naturally, the project managers in the engineering division’s wieded a great deal of power to set policy and make decisions. The manufacturing project managers did not possess the total authority shared by their engineering counterparts; they did, however, have a strong say in controlling the destiny of their projects, if not the operating policy of the division. Due to of the matrix structure, functional and project managers coexisted at the same level in the management hierarchy, both reporting directly to the division manager. While the power in the division was spread evenly between functional and project management, when push came to shove, the project mangers’ possessed up what through the project structure I led to the influential edge that seemed to exist.
Make Versus Buy Decisions
As a result of the fast growth experienced by HEC, production capacity could not keep pace with demand in many cases. Some of the company’s product designs had to be off loaded either completely or partially for the production phase of a contract. The question of who should/would make the decision whether to manufacture in-house or off-load a particular product was always a point of contention. At least three parties influenced the decision: (1) the manufacturing project manager (MPM) (2) the manufacturing functional managers, and (3) the engineering project manager. Initially a manufacturing project plan is published by the MPM. The engineering project manager can influence make-buy decisions by the way the products are specified on the drawings to be used for manufacturing facility is incapable of producing, the MPM has no alternative but to have the product fabricated by a firm with the necessary capability.
Project tiger and the Cable Shop
The decision faced by the Tiger MPM regarding the selection of a production location for the Tiger electronic cables is a dramatic example of the make-buy decisions faced by HEC managers. Below is a description of the cast of characters who attempt to influence the Tiger MPM’s decisions.
Final Assembly Project Engineer: Wally Carr has 25 years experience with the company, worked his way up through the ranks, and has an inherent distrust for the wire and cable shop because of bad past experiences. His advice to the MPM is: ‘We should set up our own shop over in the new Tiger final assembly building. This can have control over our own destiny. That’s what we did on the old Stingray project and it worked great. Those cable guys never meet their schedules.”
Cable Project Engineer: Charlene Rain has five years experience in the firm and was previously in sales for a small electronics distributor. It known to anyone at the time, she has purchased an interest in a local wire and cable subcontractor that specializes in doing overflow work from large prime contractors. Her advice to the MPM is: “We should off-load these cables to a local vendor. They are a simple design and we need to concentrate our manufacturing engineering efforts on the more complicated designs.”
Examination Paper of Construction Management
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Wire and cable department Manager: Richard Treese, who recently took over the wire department, has already shown signs of improving a department that definitely needed some improvement. He is also the direct manager of the wire project engineer who is in favour of off-loading. His advice to the MPM is: “I know the department is near capacity right now, but some months from now when the Tiger project comes down the pike, we will be ready to handle it. We will deliver quality cables to meet your schedules.
Questions:
You are the project manager: you know how important project is for, both, the company and your career.
1. Should you go with a department that has been chronically delaying when the contract has a large incentive/penalty clause for on-time delivery?
2. Can you risk sending out a design to a supplier when the design is to be proved?
Caselet 2
In mid-1998, the personal products divisions of HLL launched campaign called ‘Project Bharat’ to be carried out by the end of 1999. ‘Project Bharat’ was a direct marketing exercise undertaking to address the issues of awareness, attitudes and habits of rural consumers and increase the penetration level of HLL products. It was the first and the largest rural home-to-home operation to have ever been taken up by any company carried out its direct marketing operations in the high potential districts of the country to attract first-time users.
Under ‘Project Bharat,’ HLL vans villages and sold small packs consisting of low-unit-price pack each of its detergent, toothpaste, face cream and talcum powder for Rs. 15. During the sales, company representatives also explained to the people how to use these products with the help of a video show. The villagers were also educated about the superior benefits of using the company’s products as compared to their current habits. This was very helpful for HLL, as it created awareness of its product categories and the availability of the affordable packs.
However, the company sensed that the sampling campaign was not enough to attract first time users. Therefore, it rolled out a follow-up program called the ‘Integrated Rural Promotion Van’ (IRPV), which further enhanced the awareness about LL’s products in village with an population above 2000.
Another program targeted at villages with a population of less than 2000 was simultaneously launched. Under this program, the company provided self-employment opportunities to villagers through Self-Help Groups (SHG). SGHs operated like direct-to home distributors wherein groups of 15-20 villagers who are the poverty line (those people whose monthly income was less than Rs. 750 per month) were provided with an opportunity to take micro-credit from banks. Using this money, villagers could buy HLL’s products and sell them to consumers, thereby, generating income as well as employment for themselves. This activity also helped the company increase the reach of its products.
Questions:
1. What are the significant features of HLL’s ad campaign ‘Project Bharat’?
2. How has HLL identified itself with India’s ‘Economic Development’?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Construction Management
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Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should from the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Who is a ‘Project Manager’? Describe the role of a project manager.
2. What is ‘PMIS’ report? Explain the benefits of establishing “PMIS”.
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END OF SECTION C


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Managerial Economics
MM.100 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & Short notes type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one: Multiple choices:
1. It is a study of economy as a whole.
a. Macroeconomics
b. Microeconomics
c. Recession
d. Inflation
2. A comprehensive formulation which specifies the factors that influence the demand for the product.
a. Market demand
b. Demand schedule
c. Demand function
d. Income effect
3. It is computed when the data is discrete and therefore incremental changes is measurable.
a. Substitution effect
b. Arc elasticity
c. Point elasticity
d. Derived demand
4. Goods & services used for final consumption is called:
a. Demand
b. Consumer goods
c. Producer goods
d. Perishable goods
5. The curve at which satisfaction is equal at each point.
a. Marginal utility
b. Cardinal measure of utility
c. The Indifference Curve
d. Budget line
6. Costs that are reasonably expected to be incurred in some future period or periods are:
a. Future costs
b. Past costs
Examination Paper of Managerial Economics
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c. Incremental costs
d. Sunk costs
7. Condition when the firm has no tendency either to increase or to contract its output:
a. Monopoly
b. Profit
c. Equilibrium
d. Market
8. Total market value of all finished goods & services produced in a year by a country’s residents is known as:
a. National income
b. Gross national product
c. Gross domestic product
d. Real GDP
9. The sum of net value of goods & services produced at market prices:
a. Government expenditure
b. Product approach
c. Income approach
d. Expenditure approach
10. The market value of all the final goods & services made within the borders of a nation in an year.
a. Globalization
b. Subsidies
c. GDP
d. GNP
Part Two:
1. Discuss the concept of Demand Schedule.
2. Explain the law of ‘Diminishing marginal returns’.
3. List the various forms of Market Structure.
4. What are the various methods of measuring national income?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Case let carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
Case let 1
Examination Paper of Managerial Economics
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The war on drugs is an expensive battle, as a great deal of resources go into catching those who buy or sell illegal drugs on the black market, prosecuting them in court, and housing them in jail. These costs seem particularly exorbitant when dealing with the drug marijuana, as it is widely used, and is likely no more harmful than currently legal drugs such as tobacco and alcohol. There’s another cost to the war on drugs, however, which is the revenue lost by governments who cannot collect taxes on illegal drugs. In a recent study for the Fraser Institute, Canada, Economist Stephen T. Easton attempted to calculate how much tax revenue the government of the country could gain by legalizing marijuana. The study estimates that the average price of 0.5 grams (a unit) of marijuana sold for $8.60 on the street, while its cost of production was only $1.70. In a free market, a $6.90 profit for a unit of marijuana would not last for long. Entrepreneurs noticing the great profits to be made in the marijuana market would start their own grow operations, increasing the supply of marijuana on the street, which would cause the street price of the drug to fall to a level much closer to the cost of production. Of course, this doesn’t happen because the product is illegal; the prospect of jail time deters many entrepreneurs and the occasional drug bust ensures that the supply stays relatively low. We can consider much of this $6.90 per unit of marijuana profit a risk-premium for participating in the underground economy. Unfortunately, this risk premium is making a lot of criminals, many of whom have ties to organized crime, very wealthy. Stephen T. Easton argues that if marijuana was legalized, we could transfer these excess profits caused by the risk premium from these grow operations to the government: If we substitute a tax on marijuana cigarettes equal to the difference between the local production cost and the street price people currently pay – that is, transfer the revenue from the current producers and marketers (many of whom work with organized crime) to the government, leaving all other marketing and transportation issues aside we would have revenue of (say) $7 per [unit]. If you could collect on every cigarette and ignore the transportation, marketing, and advertising costs, this comes to over $2 billion on Canadian sales and substantially more from an export tax, and you forego the costs of enforcement and deploy your policing assets elsewhere. One interesting thing to note from such a scheme is that the street price of marijuana stays exactly the same, so the quantity demanded should remain the same as the price is unchanged. However, it’s quite likely that the demand for marijuana would change from legalization. We saw that there was a risk in selling marijuana, but since drug laws often target both the buyer and the seller, there is also a risk (albeit smaller) to the consumer interested in buying marijuana. Legalization would eliminate this risk, causing the demand to rise. This is a mixed bag from a public policy standpoint: Increased marijuana use can have ill effects on the health of the population but the increased sales bring in more revenue for the government. However, if legalized, governments can control how much marijuana is consumed by increasing or decreasing the taxes on the product. There is a limit to this, however, as setting taxes too high will cause marijuana growers to sell on the black market to avoid excessive taxation. When considering legalizing marijuana, there are many economic, health, and social issues we must analyze. One economic study will not be the basis of Canada’s public policy decisions, but Easton’s research does conclusively show that there are economic benefits in the legalization of marijuana. With governments scrambling to find new sources of revenue to pay for important social objectives such as health care and education expect to see the idea raised in Parliament sooner rather than later. Questions:
1. Plot the demand schedule and draw the demand curve for the data given for Marijuana in the case above.
2. On the basis of the analysis of the case above, what is your opinion about legalizing marijuana in Canada?
Case let 2
Examination Paper of Managerial Economics
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
The Stock Market The stock market is very close to a perfect competitive market. The price of a stock usually is determined by the market forces of demand and supply of the stock and individual buyers and sellers of the stock have little effect on price (they are price-takers). Resources are mobile as stock is bought and sold frequently. Information about prices and quantities is readily available. Funds flow into stocks and resources flow into uses in which the rate of return. Thus stock prices provide the signal for efficient allocation of investment in the economy. However, imperfections occur here also though the stock market is very close to a perfect competition, for example, sale of huge amount of stocks by a large corporation will certainly affect (depress) the price of its stocks. Question 1. Find out the characteristic of National Stock Exchange.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. What do you understand by Monitory Policy? Discuss roles and functions of RBI.
2. What is the concept of law of demand? Discuss Elasticity of Demand in detail.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Financial Management
Subject Code-B-103 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one: Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees, licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the
management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the
constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of
the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through
diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Financial Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1
Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case
On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office
of the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan
department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in
person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had
considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor
for the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided
to “work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This
information seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank
According to Gupta, the purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they
could be collected. He explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash
to purchase materials but his customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively
new in the business, he did not feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or
payment in advance. Instead, he could quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until
completion of the job for payment. To show that his operation was sound, he included a list of
customers and projects with his loan application. He also included a list of current receivables.
Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had
financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In
addition, he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank.
Question:
1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company
Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a
correct decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based
products used in a variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and
heavy manufacturing. In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are
marketed by a wholly-owned subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters
and warehouse facility in San Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume
of $85 million in sales annually. About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by
Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle
credit application and collections on 4,600 accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to
$85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net 30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the
average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales.
Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc., a wholesale supply dealer serving
the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth and has grown steadily since
that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and had no previous contact
with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence International under the same
terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent customers. Although Bajaj
Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary operated independently
and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s cost-accounting
department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca Electronics. Bajaj
Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that these percentages
would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket expenses that
were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the contact with
Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area. James would
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would be paid
whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in collecting
any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur variable
costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline,
warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead
approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential
profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming
that Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup
on these sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the
discount. If Neck Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the
cost of financing the receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit
from the account, Gupta was concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers
could become bad debts at any time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever
their accounts were overdue. His department probably spent three times as much money and effort
managing a marginal account as compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and
uncollected funds had to be financed by Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow –
paying or marginal accounts were very costly to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind,
Gupta began to review the credit application for Booth Plastics.
Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth
Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of
credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists o  f Applied Theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 
1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while
determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive
working capital.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Lean Materials Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiples Choice & Short Note Type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. The top management planning process during which the Demand and Supply sides of the
business meet one a month for risk assessment and analysis is called___________.
a. Sales and operation planning (S&OP)
b. Sales, Inventory and operation planning (SIOP)
c. Production, sales and Inventory (PSI) process
d. All of the above
2. Which of the following comes under 5-S?
a. Seri
b. Seiketsu
c. Straighten
d. All of the above
3. ___________is the process of aligning components with process to meet customer need.
a. Lean management
b. Material management
c. Inventory Management
d. None of the above
4. ________refers to the way that the material requirement system generates the signal for
material to move.
a. Planning
b. Demand
c. Execution
d. None of the above
5. BOMs stands for_______
6. SMED stand for_____________
a. Simple manufacturing exchange of Die
b. Single minute execution of die
c. Single manufacturing engineers and design
d. Society for manufacturing engineers and design
Examination Paper of Lean Materials Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
7. Which of the following comes under Reliability?
a. Quality
b. Integrity of promises
c. Responsiveness to schedule changes
d. All of the above
8. DMAIC stand for_______
a. Denote, Measurable, Auctions, Improvement, Create
b. Define, Measurement, Analyze, Improve, Control
c. Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control
d. None of the above
9. _________ are about accountability in organizations and, thus are everywhere in highperformance
businesses.
a. Planning
b. Communication
c. Management
d. None of the above
10. ___________ is a mapping exercise to track information or decision making through an
organization chart.
a. TVM
b. ERP
c. VOAM
d. JIT
Part Two:
1. Write a short note on Vendor Managed Inventory?
2. Differentiate between functional manufacturing and process flow?
3. How would you explain the rules for master production schedule level loading?
4. What do you understand by the term of Inventory Management?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Examination Paper of Lean Materials Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS & DECISION MAKING
Times are slow for your company right now and with the rising costs of materials and wages, your profits
are at an all-time low. Because of this unfortunate situation, you will need to let some employees go. The
senior management team has already compiled the list of people whose employment will be terminated
two weeks from today. However, the people on the list will not know until the day of the termination.
You have called a meeting of your department managers and supervisors (judges). The managers and
supervisors do not know that a list has been created, so you will need to let them know this at some point
in the conversation. Also, they will not be able to see the list until the day of the terminations. Obviously,
this is a very confidential topic and should not be shared with anybody outside of this meeting.
The purpose of your meeting today is to confide in this group and assure them that none of them are on
the list. You also want to get their feedback on how the general employee base will react to the news and
event in two weeks. Next, you’d like to understand and anticipate any questions that they believe will
arise so that appropriate answers can be prepared. Finally, you would like to devise an action
plan/transition plan for the day after the event.
What you can tell the managers is the number of people they will each be losing, if you find that
information important to share. Here is the breakdown:
 Order Processing will lose four of its 12 people
 Human Resources will lose two of its five people
 Production will lose eight of its 40 people
After introductions, you should begin discussing this upcoming event with your managers (judges). Spend
as much time on each of the following questions as your group feels is necessary.
Questions:
1. How will this impact the areas?
2. How will the department managers plan for this without breaking confidentiality?
Caselet 2
Alton Towers
Alton Towers was voted the UK’s number one theme park again this year. It is located in the
heart of England in Staffordshire, where there is easy access from both the M1 and M6,
although access through the village of Alton towards the site is difficult. The roads are narrow
and there are twisting bends, which coaches find difficult to manoeuvre round.
The site evolved from being a traditional English garden attraction in the 1950s to an exciting
leisure park after a company decision was made in the 1980s to convert the gardens to an
American-style theme park. The aim was to attract more visitors. The idea was a success and
over the years the park has been constantly updated with increasingly bigger and more exciting
rides and spectacular attractions. Alton Towers set out to be the market leader from the
beginning. It boasts the best attractions in the UK. It was the first to have the largest flume in
the world in 1982.
The company was taken over by the Tussauds Group in 1990. Changes were made to existing
attractions and layout of the park. Other changes included a short walk towards Thunder
Valley, leading to the Haunted House.
Examination Paper of Lean Materials Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
In 1994 the most spectacular ride ever seen in the UK was introduced. This was Nemesis – an
inverted roller coaster. The thrilling suspended ride – Oblivion – was opened in 1998. This is
a vertical drop roller coaster. The latest addition to the park in 2000 is the Hex – the legend of
the Towers. This is a disorientating ‘haunted’ swing. These ‘white -knuckle’ rides are now
located in the X-Sector. In 1996 a £10m themed hotel on the outskirts of the park was opened.
Participants in the Haunted House and X-Sector rides are photographed as they take part.
These photographs are ready for viewing and purchasing at the end of the rides.
There is an admission charge to the park, but once inside the park all the rides and attractions
are free. Ticket prices are differentiated and include Peak and Off -Peak, Day Tickets, Family
Tickets and Season Tickets.
Visitors to the park can choose to eat at a variety of restaurants dotted all over the park.
Each ride has its own souvenir shop attached and there are also gift shops where Alton Towers
merchandise can be purchased at prices to suit all pockets.
Alton Towers is open every day to visitors from around 24 March until 31 October each year.
Every year 2.7 million visitors visit the park. The volume of visitors in the summer means that
long queues can form, although a ticket reservation process is in operation for the most popular
rides. Alton Towers is not seeking to increase the number of visitors passing through the
gates, but to encourage people to spend more on food and merchandise and to come back again.
Questions
1. Explain how Alton Towers kept ahead of the competition in the years from 1982 until
present.
2. Explain the benefits to Alton Towers of having restaurants and souvenir shops dotted
around the site?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Describe the control Group method? Explain the effective steps and results of it?
2. Define the customer focused Quality (Six Sigma)? How many steps are involve in DMAIC
process?
3. Explain the following terms?
a) Kanban
b) kaizen
c) Lean Inventory Strategy
END OF SECTION C
S-2-050614


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CONTACT:
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Retail Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Notes Type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 2 marks each & Part Two carries 4 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The minimum value of Conversion ratio is_________
a. 0
b. 0.5
c. 2
d. 1
2. The law of retail gravitation is also called__________
a. Huff‟s law.
b. Belly‟s law.
c. Philip Kotler‟s law.
d. Relly‟s law.
3. In Huff‟s probability model of retail store location, the exponential „alpha‟ denotes,
a. The attractiveness of the store.
b. Power of the store in terms of potential customer located farthest.
c. It is simply a power over the attractiveness of the store.
d. None.
4. If the market has low level of retail saturation then the chances of success in the market is,
a. Higher.
b. Lower.
c. Unpredictable.
d. Extremely lower
5. If the original price be „a‟ and the reduce price be „b‟ then the mark down % in Pricing techniques
is given by,
a. (a – b)/a.
b. (a – b)/b.
c. (b – a)/a.
d. (b – a)/b.
Part Two:
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What do mean by „Super market‟?
2. What do you understand by Upper and Lower threshold in pricing methodologies?
3. What does the term „silent market‟ say?
4. Explain „Gap theory‟ related with service quality.
5. Explain barometric technique used for sales forecasting.
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Retail Management
Shane Flynn graduated from UCD with a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 and has worked in the retail sector
ever since. Although he has always entertained the idea of postgraduate studies, after four years in
university Shane was ready to get out and start earning some money in the „real world‟.
While working as retail business manager for Statoil Ireland in 2005, Shane learned about the part-time
MBS in Retail Management in DIT Aungier Street, and decided the time was right for a return to
college. „It was very hard, but I‟m glad I had commercial experience before I undertook this, I don‟t
know if I would have managed it straight after the BA degree,‟ he says.
His management were completely in agreement and Shane received full support, with regard to both
fees and time-off, during his two-year studies. The MBS in Retail Management required that Shane
attend lectures every Tuesday afternoon from 2pm, and also spend a week „on-campus‟ attending
lectures and producing papers on three or four occasions. Topaz Energy Group acquired both Statoil‟s
and Shell‟s Irish operations while Shane was in college, and he is now retail manager of every Statoil
and Shell branded filling station in Ireland. Thankfully, Topaz was more than willing to continue
supporting Shane‟s educational efforts.
In response to a query on how his course work could be applied to real-life work situations, Shane
mentions his dissertation topic that examined whether a lean management strategy can give a
competitive advantage to a forecourt operator. „Very specifically that helped me, but in all the classes I
learned something that I‟ve been able to apply successfully to work, be it human resource management,
supply chain, or whatever.‟
1. Did the fact that Shane was working and could think of real-world applications for what he was
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
learning make the course more interesting?
2. How would you describe Shane‟s experience of part-time postgraduate education?
Caselet 2
Bobcat India Limited revolutionized footwear selling in India. The company hit upon the idea of
reaching customers through exclusive retail stores way back in 1932 and set up its own outlets,
which numbered around 1,200. It was no mean task setting up such a large network of retail outlets,
especially when 90% of them were owned and operated by the company, the rest being dealerowned
and operated. This chain store format identify has been a strong differentiating factor in the
Indian retail sector, being the first of its kind. Combined with the high quality of the footwear, the
brand soon had top-of-the-mind recall and stayed there for many years. Unit a few years ago, the
name „Bobcat‟ was synonymous with organized retailing in India, the only one of its kind.
The Chain Store Format
The Bobcat chain store format had its own credo – a signature store design with exclusive signage
and windows in order to facilitate easy association in the minds of the Indian consumers.
At present there are only two major categories of stores in the Bobcat Chain Store format:
(a) Bobcat Family Stores
(b) Bobcat Bazaar
(a) Bobcat Family Stores
These are sub-dividend into two formats again, based on the size of the stores. They are:
(1) Super Stores, generally more than 5,000 sq.ft. Catering to customers in the footwear category.
(2) High-street stores that are anywhere between 500 and 1,500 sq.ft. Found in busy shopping areas.
(b) Bobcat Bazaar
Bobcat Bazaar stores sell the company‟s planned economy product lines and marked-down
merchandise round the year. Known as R-pair stores, their performance depends heavily upon the
availability of marked-down merchandise. Such markdowns are done on products that have suffered
quality accidents, are shop-soiled, lines that are closed-out etc.
Recent Format Developments
New retail formats have begun to supersede conventional ones. Independent big-box multi-brand
department stores have started selling footwear as a category, especially in metros and cities. Malls
are another new shopping format that is growing rapidly in the metros. Many upcoming footwear
retailers are obtaining space inside the malls as mall partners to take advantage of the ready footfalls
available. For the existing independent Bobcat stores it is expensive now to run campaigns and
promotions to attain the required footfalls and expected conversions.
Merchandising in Bobcat Family Stores
The exclusively of the „Bobcat‟ brand to the Bobcat retail stores was the differentiating factor for
customers until recently. However, a few years ago the company decided to sell Bobcat branded
goods through its channel sales wing called Bobcat Wholesale. Hitherto, the wholesale channel had a
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
different brand for itself called BSC. This wholesale channel supplies merchandise to footwear
retailers across India through its authorized distributors. The brand Bobcat has now been extended to
this wholesale channel too, which means that Bobcat branded goods is available in every other local
footwear store. The exclusivity of the brand to its own outlets has come to an end. And, even as the
sales of the wholesale division remain stagnant, what compelling reasons can a customer have to
visit a Bobcat Store now? A peculiar feature of the Bobcat store was its odd price points: Rs 149.95,
199.95, etc.
Merchandise presentation and Visual Merchandising
Bobcat pioneered the concept of show window displays in India with a style that was unique to the
company. It was professionally managed, with an exclusive team handling the motif and the design.
Every month the direction to decorate the show windows were given by a mailer prepared by special
decorators. Sales personnel in each store were trained to be window decorators too. Recently, these
windows had to be done away with because the company thought that they should follow the
contemporary practice of free-access retailing, where all merchandise pairs are displayed in open
shelves to enable customers to help themselves. Remember, in India footwear is always tried on a
footstool and bought after considerable service extended by the salesperson personally. Free-access
retailing may work when there is adequate space inside a store to move around. The effect of such
„pigeon-hole‟ free access is that they give an impression that they are Bobcat‟s R-Pair outlets. What
can now entice the customer into entering a Bobcat store?
Customer Service
Though Bobcat faces tough manpower challenges (the store sales personnel and managers have
separate labor unions), the sales personnel who are on its permanent rolls are trained in selling
footwear. However, there are a large proportion of untrained and temporary hands. Further,
salespersons do not wear any uniform and hence customers can hardly identify them. There is as yet
no loyalty program to create customer stickiness to any store or the brand, and most of the stores are
not connected by a central information system or ERP (enterprise-wide resource planning) as the
organization has its limitations when it comes to investing in such initiatives. Organized retail
companies need to have non-negotiable standards of customer service or they will lose customers to
its competitors. The company is now losing its market share despite its strong position in categories
like men‟s footwear, children‟s uniform shoes, etc. However, the number of stores it has around the
country is around the same, at 1,200. The company now needs to put together a plan for both its
survival and growth on a war footing. The top management is revisiting its strategies in every
functional area to turn the company around.
1. What store format mix would you recommend for the company?
2. Did the company do the right thing by extending the in-store brand to the wholesale channel?
What should it do now?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. “The Indian Retail sectors are witnessing a transition phase where organized retailing is taking a
lead over unorganized retailing”. In the light of above statement, explain the current states of
Indian Retailing.
2. “The customer is fully satisfied when the perceived services meets or exceeds their
expectations”. Explain?
END OF SECTION C
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Consumer Behaviour
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Notes Type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 2 marks each & Part Two carries 4 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The Yellow color is related with personality links like________
a. Caution, warmth
b. Power, informality
c. Passion, excitement
d. Purity, innocence
2. Consumers having high ethnocentric value in CETSCALE for foreign made products are likely to
feel that________
a. It is worthy to purchase the foreign products.
b. It is wrong to purchase foreign made products.
c. Only foreign made products should be purchased.
d. They should remain neutral.
3. If the OSL(optimum stimulation level) score of a person is greater than the lifestyle he/she is
living then he/she likely to
a. Take rest
b. Appear quite satisfied
c. Seem bored
d. Can not be predicted.
4. The psychologists who disagree with the Freud‟s theory of personality are usually referred
as_______
a. Non Freudians
b. Freudians
c. Neo Freudians
d. C-Freudians
5. According to Sigmund Freud, the human personality consists of 3 interacting systems viz the id,
the superego and the ego. What actually „id‟ refers to
a. Its role is to see the individual‟s needs in a socially acceptable fashion.
b. Its role is to drive impulsions for the needs to be satisfied immediately.
c. Its function is to control and balance the impulsive demands.
d. None
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Part Two:
1. What is a „common man approach‟?
2. Differentiate between „Enculturation‟ and „Acculturation‟.
3. Write a short note on „Rokeach Value Survey‟, a widely used value instrument, in consumer
behavior studies.
4. Explain the „Sociometric method‟ of measurement in „Opinion Leadership‟.
5. What do you understand by the term „Viral marketing‟?
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
The Indian refrigeration industry had apparently reached maturity in the eighties. The introduction
stage could be seen in 1962-66; growth, 1967-80; and maturity 1981-88.Between 1989-90 and 1990-
91, the market grew by 12 to 12.35 lakhs units; in 1992-93 it is estimated to have come down from
12 to 10.39 lakhs pieces. Thus, the decline seems to have begun. Presently, there are six main
competitors in the refrigerator market in India. The industry seems to have structure prevailing in
monopolistic competition. The products at present available in the market are under the brand names
of Godrej, Kelvinator, Voltas, Videocon, BPL and Allwyn. The new entrants to the market like BPL
and Videocon with latest ultra modern refrigeration technology have thrown down the gauntlet to the
existing leaders like Godrej and Kelvinator. A study has been conducted to find out what change
have occurred in consumers behavior due to the emergence of these new challenges, because, for all
one knows; a very tough competition has recently emerged among the industrial giants due to which
consumer behavior has undergone drastic change. The main purpose of study is to see how defectors
are affecting consumer behavior. The specific objectives of this study are positioning of products
and brands, rating of different parameters and their ranking, consumers‟ degree of satisfaction,
estimating ideal capacity and ideal prices. Consumer‟s perception of price and brand, awareness of
different brands and various sources of information to the consumer. This survey leads to the
conclusion, that most of the people are aware of 165-liter capacity with awareness of nearly 95%,
others are less known to consumers. The most important parameters for customers while buying a
refrigerator are technology, cooling efficiency, durability, price, capacity and after-sales service in
that order. According to the dealers, the customers consider brand name, technology, cooling
efficiency, durability and after-sales service as very important. Other parameters like special
gift/price, guarantee/warranty are just important parameters. According to the customers, BPL,
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Voltas and Videocon are high – priced refrigerator; Godrej and Kelvinator, comparatively lowpriced;
and Allwyn, medium-priced. From the dealers‟ survey it has been found out that the ideal
capacity is 165 liter; and the ideal price Rs. 7,000-8,000.
1. Due to the emergence of new industrial giants like BPL and Videocon, consumer
behavior has undergone a sea-change. In what ways?
2. Discuss which will be the most effective strategy according to you that will make
consumer brand loyal in the refrigerator industry.
Caselet 2
Walking down the streets of Delhi‟s Connaught place, capital‟s business heart, Mike Steve, 50 years
old CEO of Macnine shoes (India), was looking at the feet of the busy office goers. The CEO
purposely walked to his office near Super Bazar from the Palika car parking to have a first hand
feeling of the market response to the Macnine shoes, and in general the foot-wear habit of urban
Indians. Macnine shoes brought an image of simple no fuss yet elegant office-going shoes. The
shoes, known for its comfort and reasonable prices shared a good market share in face of
competition from Windsor, Red Tape, Lee Cooper, Woodland, etc. but as the days passed Mike‟s
trained eyes could see the changing scenario. Office goers no longer seemed to prefer “no fuss”
shoes, there was a distinct preference for heavy looking chunky shoes. People‟s perception about
office-going shoes was changing from regular 6-hole laced shoes to these heavy looking shoes. As a
result, Macnine shoes‟ market share decreased by 10 per cent between 1998 and 1999. Disturbed by
the fact, Mr. Steve called a meeting of the departmental heads and after five-hour long meeting it
was accepted, Indian consumers had undergone a sea change in their attitudes and perceptions about
the products. Office was no long seen as a boring work-place where a “no nonsense” rather “stiff
upper lip” attitude has to be maintained. Office was seen as more a part of regular life and a relaxed
“as you want to be” (of course within limits) attitude. Keeping pace with the time, Macnine shoes
also should shed its “traditional” image. More importantly, consumers are going more and more for
branded shoes, rather than mass production shoes that will be available at the retail shops. The
departmental heads agreed that there is a definite price-quality perception in the mind of the
consumers. Consumers perceive high price as a certificate of high quality that will be associated with
the branded products. Based on the price-quality perception, Macnine shoes were decided to be
positioned in the market. Dramatically changing from the basic principle of quality and affordability
targeting the growing middle class, the company saw a better prospect in developing a high priced
brand image as shoe was no longer, especially in big cities seen as necessity but it was a part of life
style marketing where shoes were seen as fashion accessories.
Macnine shoes which for over two decades was known for making popular affordable shoes,
took a one eighty degree turn and developed dedicated showroom with premium shoes and other
accessories like T-shirts, bags, socks etc. but, the result were quite contrary to what was expected,
the decrease in market share continued despite these efforts. The reason seems quite simple, or
decade‟s consumer has known the shoe to be in the affordable range. With this sudden change the
loyal buyers felt betrayed and turned away towards other local brands. The main selling point of the
company was missing the consumers no longer felt the urge to come to buy macnine shoes. The fact
was the brands who started as selling premium shoes were perceived to be in a category of catering
the upper category of consumers with extremely focused range of shoes which borne a premium
price. Talk of red Tape, talk of Lee Copper, the image that comes to the consumer‟s mind is of
premium shoes with all its associated characteristics. While past experience brings in the minds of
the consumer an “affordability” image of Macnine shoes. When the company drastically wanted to
Examination Paper of Retail Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
change the image, they could not fit into consumer perception of a premium shoe, while high price
deterred people who wanted affordability foremost. Macnine lost on both the grounds.
1. Explain the “role and status” for Macnine shoes.
2. Suggest some ways of changing consumer perception of Macnine shoes.
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. A college student has just purchased a new personal computer. What factors might cause the
student to experience post purchase dissonance? How might the student try to overcome it? How
can the retailer who sold the computer help reduce the student‟s dissonance? How can the
computer‟s manufacturer help?
2. An Advertising on a known deodorant shows a young beautiful girl is upset to meet her
boyfriend, as friends point out at her “Bad body odour”. The advertisement is trying to arouse
which motive in the consumer? Discuss by giving one similar examples?
S-2-300813
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION C


ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

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CONTACT:
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Enterprise Resource Planning
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
• This section consists of Multiple Choice questions & Short Answer type questions.
• Answer all the questions.
• Part One questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Enterprise Resource Planning is
a. Computer System
b. Manufacturing organization
c. Method of effective planning of all the resources in an organization
d. None of the above
2. Enterprise Resource Panning vendors are those people
a. Who are experts in administration and management of projects
b. Who have developed the ERP packages
c. Who uses the ERP system
d. None of the above
3. Interviewing and cost justification is tool and technique of
a. Design step of ERP
b. Implementation step of ERP
c. Requirement analysis of ERP
d. Planning step of ERP
4. Support re-engineering processes to fit the software systems best practice is approach of
a. Re-engineering approach
b. Customizing approach
c. Rational approach
d. None of the above
5. Process of tracking customer contacts and providing the customer with a price quote is
a. Inventory sourcing
b. Sales order processing
c. Pre-sales
d. None of the above
Examination Paper
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. The difficulty in creating an audit trial of transactions when multiple transactions use multiple
database is associated with
a. Product profitability sub-system
b. Finished goods inventory sub-system
c. Management reporting sub-system
d. Creating an audit trial sub-system
7. Differences occur between standard costs and actual costs is problem associated with
a. Accounting
b. Production
c. Purchasing / Materials Management
d. None of the above
8. MRP in Enterprise resource planning stands for
a. Maximum retail price
b. Material requirement planning
c. Management requirement planning
d. None of the above
9. Process of providing status of purchase order comes in a category of
a. Purchase order follow-up
b. Source determination
c. Determine requirement
d. Invoice verification
10. Resource failure occurs when
a. People clashes
b. Inability to communicate with the system user
c. Poor specification of requirements
d. Conflicts of people, time and project scope due to insufficient personnel
Part Two:
1. What are the advantages of the re-engineering method of implementing ERP?
2. What are the benefits reported from implementing ERP?
3. Write a short note on “Credit Management”?
4. Define Material Requirements Planning?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
• This section consists of Caselets.
• Answer all the questions.
• Each caselet carries 20 marks.
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Tech Knowledge is a start-up founded in 1997 by Robert Thyer. The company is a distributer of
presentation technologies, including computer based projection systems, video equipment, and
display technologies. The firm has 25 employees and does $5 million in sales. It is growing rapidly.
The owner, Robert Thyer, would like to netsource the back-office functions of the firm because the
company does not have an internal IT capability. The applications to be netsourced would include
sales and distribution, financial accounting, and inventory management.
TechKnowledge would like to source SAP or another ERP vendor via a hosting arrangement. It
does not expect to do much customization, and it does not have any legacy systems.
1. What factors should it use to evaluate each of these potential hosts?
2. What controls should be in place to monitor the hosting arrangement?
Caselet 2
ITM is a company specializing in network implementation and management. It provides networking
services to mid-sized companies, which do not have an internal networking analyst or IT manager.
These organizations include real estate companies, law offices, medical practices, architectural /
engineering firms, construction companies, business services providers, country clubs, community
organizations, and churches.
ITM uses a legacy accounting system to handle its financial accounting and financial
management functions. It has added on a billing package for client services. The next step is to
obtain a CRM capability to manage information about current and prospective customers more
effectively.
You have been assigned to identify potential sources for a net-sourcing arrangement with an ERP
vendor, which provides CRM capabilities.
1. Identify potential sources of software?
2. Determine five criteria you will recommend be used to evaluate each of alternative providers?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
• This section consists of Long Questions.
• Answer all the questions.
• Each question carries 15 marks.
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Explain in brief Sales and Marketing Modules in ERP System?
2. What are the different development process in ERP systems and write a detailed note on it?
END OF SECTION C
———————————————————– ***- ——————————————————-


SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

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Supply Chain Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice questions& Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 2 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. When demand is steady, the cycle inventory for a given lot size (Q) is given by
a. Q/4
b. Q/8
c. Q/6
d. Q/2
2. There are two firms „x‟ and „y‟ located on a line of distance demand(0-1) at „a‟ and „b‟
respectively, the customers are uniformly located on the line, on keeping the fact of splitting of
market, the demand of firm „x‟ will be given by,
a. (a+b)/2
b. a+(1-b-a)/2
c. (1+b-a)/2
d. a+(a-b)/2
3. Push process in supply chain analysis is also called
a. Speculative process
b. Manufacturing process
c. Supplying process
d. Demand process
4. If the Throughput be „d‟ and the flow time be „t‟ then the Inventory „I‟ is given by
a. I *d=t
b. I=t+d
c. d=I*t
d. I =d*t
5. Forecasting method is
a. Time series
b. causal
c. Qualitative
d. All the above
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Component of order cost include
a. Handling cost
b. Occupancy cost
c. Receiving costs
d. Miscellaneous costs
7. How many distinct types of MRO inventory are there
a. One
b. Four
c. Three
d. Two
8. Supply chain driver is
a. Inventory
b. Return ability
c. Fulfillment
d. All of above
9. SRM stands for
a. Strategic Relationship Management
b. Supply Return ability Management
c. Supplier Relationship Management
d. None of the above
10. Discount factor equals to, where k is the rate of return.
a. 1/1+k
b. 2/1+k
c. 1/1-k
d. 1/2+k
Part Two:
1. Explain “zone of strategic fit”.
2. Explain “scope of strategic fit”.
3. What do you understand by “stimulation forecasting method”?
4. Write a note on “obsolescence (or spoilage) cost”.
5. Define “square law” in safety inventory of supply chain management.
6. What does the word “postponement” signifies in supply chain?
7. What do you understand by the term “tailored sourcing”?
8. Explain the term “outsourcing”.
9. Write a note on “threshold contracts” for increasing agent efforts.
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
10. What is “dynamic pricing”?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Orion is a global co. That sells copiers. Orion currently sells 10 variants of a copier, with all inventory
kept in finished-goods form. The primary component that differentiates the copiers is the printing
subassembly. An idea being discussed is to introduce commonality in the printing subassembly so
that final assembly can be postponed and inventories kept in component form. Currently, each copier
costs $1,000 in terms of components. Introducing commonality in the print subassembly will increase
component cost to$1.025.One of the 10 variants represents 80 percent of the total demand. Weekly
demand for this variant is normally distributed ,with a mean of 1,000 and a standard deviation of
200.Each of the remaining nine variants has a weekly demand of 28 with a standard deviation of
20.Orion aims to provide a 95per level of services .Replacement lead time for components is four
weeks. Copier assembly can be implemented in a matter of hours. Orion manages all inventories
using a continuous review policy and uses a holding cost of 20 percent.
1. How much safety inventory of each variant must Orion keep without component commonality?
What are the annual holding costs?
2. How much safety inventory must be kept in component form if Orion uses common components
for all variants? What is the annual holding cost? What is the increase in component cost using
commonality? Is commonality justified across all variants?
3. At what cost of commonality will complete commonality be justified?
4. At what cost of commonality will commonality across the low-volume variants be justified?
Caselet 2
An electronic manufacturer has outsourced production of its latest MP3 player to a contract
manufacturer in Asia. Demand for the players has exceeded all expectations whereas the contract
manufacturers sell three types of players- a 40-GB player, a 20-GB player, 6-GB player. For the
upcoming holiday season, the demand forecast for the 40-GB player is normally distributed, with a
mean of 20,000and a standard deviation Dard deviation of 11,000, and the demand forecast for the 6-
GB player has a mean of 80,000 and a standard deviation of 16,000. The 40-GB player has a sale
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
price of $200, a production cost of $100, and a salvage value of $80 .The 20-GB player has a price of
$150, a production cost of $70, and a salvage value of $50.
1. How many units of each type of player should the electronics manufacturer order if there are no
capacity constraints?
2. How many times of each type of player should the electronics manufacturer order if the available
is 140,000? What is the expected profit?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Consider two products with the same margin carried by a retail store. Any leftover units of one
product are worthless. Leftover units of the other product can be sold to outlet stores. Which
product should have a higher level of availability? Why?
2. McMaster-Carr sells maintenance, repair, and operations equipment from five warehouses in the
United States. W.W. Grainger sells products from more than 350 retail locations, supported by
several warehouses. In both cases, customers place orders using the Web or on the phone. Discuss
the pros and cons of the two strategies.
END OF SECTION C
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Statistical Quality Control
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice questions & Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. If in a hall there are 18 persons then how many handshakes are possible
a. 18*18
b. 18*17/2
c. 18*17
d. None
2. If the number of trials be „n‟ and the probability of occurrence be „p‟ then the standard deviation
with respect to np, is given by
a. (np)1/2
b. (np(1-p))1/2
c. (np)1/4
d. (np(1-p))1/4
3. For a biased coin the probability of occurrence of head is 0.4 ,if the coin is tossed twice then the
probability of occurrence of at least one head will be
a. 0.76
b. 0.48
c. 0.64
d. 0.16
4. Factorial of 5 equals
a. 60
b. 120
c. 24
d. 5
5. Combinatory of (4,2) equals
a. 12
b. 8
c. 6
d. None
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. „Economic Control of Quality of Manufactured Product‟, a book by Walter A Shewhart in
a. 1931
b. 1941
c. 1930
d. 1956
7. Quality is judged by…………
a. Retailer
b. Government
c. Customer
d. Hole seller
8. A run chart is a special chart of…………
a. Pie chart
b. Line chart
c. R chart
d. C chart
9. Universes may differ
a. In average
b. In above average
c. At higher level
d. All of the above
10. ASQC and ANSI began in
a. 1956
b. 1976
c. 1978
d. 1960
Part Two:
1. Differentiate between „defect‟ and „defective‟.
2. Explain the need of „short method‟.
3. What does „Tchebycheff‟s inequality theorem‟ say?
4. Explain the usability of „stochastic limit‟.
5. Write a note on „Cause and Effect‟ diagram.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
ADAPTABILITY IN ACTION: A CASE OF RSL
Rajasthan Synthetics Ltd. (RSL) was established in the year 1994 at Bhilwara, Rajasthan to
manufacture synthetic yarn with a licensed capacity of 29,000 spindles. Manish Kumar, a Harvard
Business School graduate, established RSL with 8% equity participation from Itochu Corporation
Japan to manufacture synthetic yarn for shirting, a promising business at that time. The demise of the
NTC textile mills was fresh in the minds of the promoters and therefore, state of the art technology
imported from U.K., Germany, Japan and France was used in the manufacturing facility. By the time
the company started manufacturing yarn the competition in shirting yarn had become fierce and the
returns had diminished. The company incurred losses in the first four years of its operations and the
management was looking for opportunities to turn things around. The manufacturing plant started
functioning with an installed capacity of 26,000 spindles, a small unit considering yarnmanufacturing
industry, in the year 1996 to manufacture synthetic yarn for shirting only. Initially, the
major fabric manufactures of India such as Raymonds, Donear, Grasim, Amartex, Siyaram, Pantaloon
and Arviva were the main customers of the company and the total produce of the company was sold
within the domestic market. These fabric manufactures used to import the premium quality yarn
before RSL started supplying the yarn to them. The company in the first year of its operations
realized that shirting yarn was one of the fiercely competitive products and the company with its high
interest liability was unlikely to earn the desired profits. Also, the company had a narrow product mix
limited to only two more blow room lines were installed in the first quarter of 1997. The addition of
two blow room lines helped RSL to manufacture four different types of yarns at the same time.
Utilizing this added flexibility, RSL began manufacturing yarn for suitings.Since the suiting yarn was
providing better returns, the company was keen to increase manufacturing of suiting yarn but was
hampered by the two for one doubling (TFO) facility, which was limited to only 40% of the total
produce. To remove this bottleneck, 12 more TFO machines were added to the existing 8 TFO
machines. The addition of these machines increased the doubling capacity to 70% of the production
providing additional product mix flexibility to the company. This enabled the company to
manufacture yarn to cater to the requirements of suiting, industrial fabric and carpet manufacturers. In
the initial years of its operations, RSL realized that the promises made by the Government of
Rajasthan to provide uninterrupted power supply of the required quality (stable voltage and
frequency) and ample quantity of water were unlikely to be met through the public distribution
system. The voltage and frequency of electric power provided through the public distribution system
were erratic and frequent announced and unannounced power cuts stopped production on a regular
basis. In these circumstances, meeting quality requirements of the customers and adhering to delivery
schedules was a herculean task. To ensure smooth and uninterrupted operations RSL installed inhouse
power generation facility of 4 megawatts capacity and dug 10 tube-wells.RSL faced stiff
competition in the domestic market from Gujarat Spinning and Weaving Mills, Surat, Rajasthan
Textile Mills, Bhawani Mandi, Charan Spinning Mills, Salem and Indorama Synthetics Ltd.,
Pithampur in all their product categories and the returns were low. In order to combat stiff
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
competition in the domestic market and improve returns the company started developing export
markets for their products in the year 1998. Initially, RSL started exporting carpet yarn to Belgium
and till 2001; carpet yarn formed the major component of their exports. A trade agreement was signed
with Fibratex Corporation, Switzerland to share profits equally for expanding their overseas
operations. During the same period, RSL continued to scout for new export markets and was
successful in entering top-of-the-line fancy for premium fashion fabric manufactures of international
repute like Mango and Zara. Rajasthan Synthetics Ltd. also exported fancy yarn to a number of fabric
manufacturers located in Italy, France, England, Spain and Portugal. Yarn manufacturers from
Indonesia, Korea and Taiwan gave stiff competition to RSL when it entered the international market.
The companies from South Asian countries had a major cost advantage over RSL because of cheap,
uninterrupted availability of power and high labour productivity. Currencies had been sharply
devalued during the South Asian financial crisis, which rendered the products manufactured by these
companies still cheaper in international markets. Despite all these disadvantages, RSL was able to
gain a foothold through constant adaption of their products according to the customer requirements in
the highly quality conscious international yarn market and was exporting 95% of its total produce by
the beginning of the year 2002.
Rajasthan Synthetics Ltd. had fine-tuned its distribution channels according to the type of markets
and size of orders from the customers. In line with this policy the export to Middle East, Far East and
Turkey was carried out through agents. Similarly, low volume export of fancy yarn requirements was
also catered through agents. While dealing with importers directly, RSL strictly followed the policy
of exports against confirmed Letter of Credits only. The company directly exported to important
clients in Belgium, England and France. The domestic market was also served through an agency
system. Rajasthan Synthetics Ltd. considered inventories as an unnecessary waste and kept minimum
possible inventories while ensuring required level of service. To ensure that the inventories were held
to a minimum, the manufacturing plan consisted of 60 to 70% against customer orders, 30 to 40%
against anticipated sales and 2% capacity was reserved for new product development. A Strategic
Management Committee (SMC) consisting of MD, CEO, GM (marketing) and GM (technical)
reviewed the production plan of the manufacturing plant on quarterly basis. The SMC also developed
the plans for profitability, product mix and cost minimization. Delivering high-quality products and
meeting delivery commitments for every shipment were essential pre-requisites to be successful in the
global market place. The company had understood this very early and to ensure that the products
manufactured by RSL met the stringent quality requirements of its international customers, the
company had developed a full-fledged testing laboratory equipped with ultra modern testing
machines like User Tester-3 and Classifault. The company had stringent quality testing checks at
every stage of tarn production right from mixing of fiber to packing of finished cones. Its in-house
Research and Development and Statistical Quality Control (SQC) divisions ensured consistent
technical specifications with the help of sophisticated state-of-the-art machines. A team of
professionally qualified and experienced personnel to ensure that the yarn manufactured by the
company was in line with international standards backed the company. The company continuously
upgraded its product mix and at the same time, new products developed by in-house research and
development department were added to the product mix form time to time. RSL‟s management was
quick to analyze the potential of these in-house developments and followed a flexible approach in
determining the level of value addition. The company had developed a new yarn recently and was
selling it under the Rajtang brand name. This new yarn was stretchable in three dimensions, absorbed
moisture quickly, was soft and silky and fitted the body. This yarn was extracted from natural
products and being body-friendly, was in great demand in international markets. Looking at the
higher value addition possibilities RSL decided to forward integrate and started manufacturing fabric,
using Rajtang and provided ready-made garments like swimming suit, tracksuit, undergarments, tops,
slacks and kids dresses. The ready-made dresses from the fabric were being manufactured on the
specifications and designs of RSL. The management decided to market these products under the
brand name “Wear-it” through Wearwell Garments Pvt. Ltd., an associate company of RSL, to ensure
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
that RSL did not lose its focus. The Managing Director of RSL felt that continuous adaptability to
market requirements through a flexible approach, cost cutting in every sphere of operations and team
approach to management had taken them ahead. However, RSL had become highly dependent on the
volatile export market and if it was not able to retain the international market it would have to reestablish
itself in the domestic market, which was not an easy task.
1. What marketing strategy should RSL adopt to remain competitive in the international market?
2. Has the company taken the right decision to forward integrate and enter into the highly volatile
garment market?
Caselet 2
Popular mythology in the United States likes to refer to pre-World War II Japan as a somewhat
backward industrial power that produced and exported mostly trinkets and small items of dubious
quality bought by Americans impoverished by the Great Depression. Few bring up the fact that, prior
to the Pearl Harbor attack, Japan had conquered what are now Korea, Manchuria, Taiwan, and a large
portion of China, Vietnam, and Thailand; and by the end of 1942 Japan had extended its empire to
include Burma, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, New Guinea, plus many
strings of islands in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Its navy had moved a large armada of worships 4,000
miles across the Pacific Ocean, in secret and in silence, to attack Pearl Harbor and then returned
safely home. Manufacturers capable of producing only low-grade goods don‟t accomplish such feats.
High-quality standards for military hardware, however, did not extend to civilian and export goods,
which received very low priority during the war years. Thus the perception in the United States for a
long time before and then immediately after the war had nothing to do with some inherent character
flaw in Japanese culture or industrial capability. It had everything to do with Japan‟s national
priorities and the availability of funds and material. Following Japan‟s surrender in 1945, General
MacArthur was given the task of rebuilding the Japanese economy on a peaceful footing. As part of
that effort an assessment of damage was to be conducted and a national census was planned for 1950.
Deming was asked in 1947 to go to Japan and assist in that effort. As a result of his association with
Shewhart and quality training, he was contacted by representatives from the Union of Japanese
Scientists and Engineers (JUSE), and in 1950, Deming delivered his now famous series of lectures on
quality control. His message to top industry leaders, whom he demanded to attend, and to JUSE was
that Japan had to change its image in the United States and throughout the world. He declared that it
could not succeed as an exporter of poor quality and argued that the tools of statistical quality control
could help solve many quality problems. Having seen their country devastated by the war, industry
and government leaders were eager to learn the new methods and to speed economic recovery.
Experience was to prove to Deming and others that, without the understanding, respect, and support
of management, no group of tools alone could sustain a long-term quality improvement effort.
1. How could have the SQC approach, been useful in solving the immediate problems of Japan?
2. If you were among one of the management members, what would have been your first insight?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Supply Chain Management
10
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Practical Problems (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
1. A sample of 30 is to be selected from a lot of 200 articles. How many different samples are
possible?
2. In Dodge‟s CSP-1, it is desired to apply sampling inspection to 1 piece out of every 15 and to
maintain an AOQL of 2%. What should be the value of i?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-30008


GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Global Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multi Choice & Short Note type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
1. All the ethnocentric orientations are collectively called______________
2. Which of the following comes under benefits of Global marketing?
a. Endurance
b. Sales Promotion
c. Diversification
d. All of the above
3. The Polycentric orientation is the opposite of ethnocentrism. (T/F)
4. NAFTA stands for____________
5. ______________refers to the ability of the product and the company from that of the competitors
a. Positioning
b. Differentiation
c. Customer value
d. None
6. CAT stands for _______________
7. Cave dwellers are______________
8. LIFO stands for life in fire option.(T/F)
9. Starbursts are _______________
10. _____________is an advantage over competitors gained by offering consumers greater value
Part Two:
1. What are the implications of tariffs in the Global Marketing?
2. Write a short note on “Diffusion Theory”.
3. Discuss the concept of competitive marketing strategies.
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
4. Discuss the importance of marketing mix.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
The competitive advantage of nations and the competitiveness of locations have become important
topics in economic policy. Competitiveness is productivity; competitiveness is what the world
economic forum defines as the set of institutions and policies that determine the level of
productivity. There is no single determinant of competitiveness, there‟s no single determinant of
productivity.
Things that matter for example are the macroeconomic stability of a country, the soundness of
institutions whether the judiciary for example is independent or favors particular sectors or
businesses, whether the government acts in efficient ways or in sectarian ways, other determinants of
competitiveness involve market efficiency, labour market flexibility, and financial market flexibility.
The whole growth competitiveness index that is the index that has been used over the least five or
six years by the world economic forum captures the three big concepts: macroeconomic stability,
government institutions and innovations.
1. What are the indicators of global competitiveness? Discuss the new tools to determine global
competitiveness.
Caselet 2
In this new millennium, few business houses can afford a turn a blind eye to global business
opportunities. According to the latest Mckinsey Global Survey, top global executives believe that the
growing number of consumers in emerging markets will be the most important trend for global
business during the next five years. On 15th April 1994, trade ministers of 123 countries signed the
final Act of the GATT Uruguay Round of negotiations at Marrakech, bringing the WTO into being
on 1st January 1995.
The object of the Act is the liberalization of world trade. By it member countries undertake to apply
fair trade rules covering commodities, services and intellectual property. It provides for the lowering
of tariffs on industrial goods and tropical products; the abolition of import duties on a variety of
items; the progressive abolition of quotas on garments and textiles; the gradual reduction of trade
distorting subsidies and import barriers, and agreements on intellectual property and trade in
services.
1. Discuss the provisions of world Trade Organization (WTO). What are implications of WTO,
agreements on international business?
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. By marketing in a foreign country must a firm automatically utilize geographic segmentation or
some other segmentation basis discuss.
2. Distinguish between direct and indirect selling channels. What are the advantages and
disadvantages of each?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-300813

Examination Paper of Business Communication
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code-B-109 Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Operating Systems
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The PCD data is allocated using a data Structure is called______________
a. Heap
b. Object Module
c. Tag
d. Head
2. Process is
a. Language of programme
b. Name of a computer software
c. An execution of programme
d. None of the above
3. Streaming tape can store record
a. Without a break irrespective of its size
b. With a break in size of record
c. Of size 10 kb
d. Both (a) & (c)
4. _______________is a policy decision based on the page reference information available in the page table.
a. Memory Allocation
b. Shared Pages
c. Page Replacement
d. Memory Mapping
5. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Multiprocessor computer system provides
a. Slow performance by serving several processes simultaneously
b. High performance by serving several processes simultaneously
c. High performance by serving one process
d. None of the above
7. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
8. A distributed transaction is also called
a. Single-site transaction
b. Two –site transaction
c. Multi-site transaction
d. Both (a) & (b)
9. File control block (FCB) contains all information concerning
a. A file processing activity
b. Execution activity
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
10. Non-uniform memory architecture system consists of number of nodes and each node consists
a. Monitor
b. Register
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. 1 or more C.P.Us
True & False:
1. CPU helps in effective memory management by an OS.
2. High reliability in distributed file systems can be ensured through sharing semantics.
3. The compatible time sharing system for the IBM 7094 was one of the first time sharing systems.
4. The Processors of multiprocessors are divide into processor sets.
5. A resource rank is associated with each resource class.
6. A cached directory is a copy of directory that exists at a primary site.
7. A cluster of nodes is a section of the distributed system that contains sufficient hardware and software resources.
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
8. A cycle is a sufficient condition for a deadlock in MISR system
9. File system integrity implies correctness and consistency of control data and operations of the file system.
10. A mathematical model consists of three components model of the server
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions (Answer should be in 5 Line).
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question is of 5 marks.
1. What do you mean by “Authentication”?
2. Distinguish between File System and IOCS.
3. Define “Segmentation with Paging”.
4. Describe the Deadlock characteristics for different resource system.
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions (Word Limit 100 words)
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any three Questions.
1. Write a Short Note on “Structure of an Operating System”.
2. Define Request-Reply-Acknowledgement Protocol and Explain a Blocking version of RRA Protocol.
3. Explain how starvation is avoided the UNIX and Window system?
4. Discuss influence of disk scheduling algorithms on effectiveness of I/O buffering?
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Describe why authentication is important for file protection?
2. Show actions of the basic and control parts of a process to important Ricart-Agrawala Algorithm?
S-2-301012
END OF SECTION D
END OF SECTION C


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Human Resource Development & Training
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choi  ces and Short Notes Type Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. HRD is the process of helping people to acquire________
a. Competition
b. Completeness
c. Competencies
d. None of the above
2. Techniques of human resource development are also called_______
a. HRD Methods
b. HRD Instruments
c. HRD Mechanism
d. All of above
3. In India HRD began only in______
a. 1970s
b. 1980s
c. 1910s
d. 1990s
4. BARS Stand for______
a. Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale
b. Behaviorally Anchoring Rating Scale
c. Behaviorally Appraisal Rating Scale
d. None of the above
5. Levels of evaluations of Training programme are:
a. 7
b. 6
c. 5
d. 10
6. Performance appraisal in a _________process of identifying, planning, developing
employee Performance.
a. Multi-Stages
b. Single-Stages
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
c. Dual-Stages
d. All of the above
7. Halo effect is the tendency to the judge all aspects of a________
a. Person’s behaviour
b. Perspective behaviour
c. Performance appraisal
d. All of the above
8. QWL Stand for_______
a. Quality of work life
b. Quality of worker life
c. Quantity of work life
d. None of the above
9. 360- degree feedback can be used s a tool for performance_______
a. Appraisal
b. Analyze
c. Assessment
d. None of the above
10. Career planning is a _______that constitute what a person does for a living.
a. Sequence of career
b. Sequence of jobs
c. Sequence of sum
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Discuss the various methods of Appraisal?
2. Briefly explain ‘On the job and Off the job’ methods of Training and Development.
3. Explain the objectives of ‘Performance Appraisal’.
4. Differentiate between HRM and HRD concept.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of caselets. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselets carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should from the part of your answer ( Word limit 150 to 200 words.) 
Case let 1
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
Introduction to the Organization:
XYZ Company was established 20 years ago, to manufacture gearbox components for diesel engines.
It employs around 250 people, having a head office, which employs a wide range of personnel who
are generally well educated and enthusiastic about their work, and a factory, which employs semiskilled
local people who are generally disinterested in the products of the company and who have an
instrumental attitude to work, seeing salary as the only reward.
Brief Description of the Problem:
The performance of the company has not been good and the records revealed the following facts:
  Wastage within the factory was costing the company approximately Rs.100,000 a month. 
  There was wide spread differences in individual work standards. 
  Processes were non-standardized resulting in repeated problems. 
 Management made all decisions and cascaded the results down to employees. 

 The top management become concerned about the performance of the factory and they hired.
Mr. Tanmoy Deb, an OD consultant to study the problem and suggest specific changes to
 relationship and tasks with the following objectives: 
  To review and improve communication systems. 
  To restructure the organization and to review teamwork and quality practices. 
 To review leadership issues across all levels. 

Mr. Tanmoy Deb carried out discussions, interviews and surveys and made the following
 observation: 
  There’ and ‘us’ attitude was widely prevalent between head office and factory personnel. 
  Production personnel lacked technical skills. 
  Factory employees felt alienated from sharing the Company’s success. 
  Production systems were adhoc and defective because of frequent variation in standards set. 
  Many times raw material was found to be of inferior quality. 
 Rigidly defined job descriptions. 
Questions:
1. What in your view are the central human resource issues involved in this case?
2. What Strategy should Mr. Tanmoy Deb develop and implement for improving the present system?
Case let 2
Introduction to the Organization:
XYZ Company is an existing profit making FMCG Company. The company has 600 personnel and
has branches all other the country. It has a separate training department with a Training Manager, Mr.
A.P. Mohan as its head who is supported by two qualified training officers. Mr. Mohan has been in
the company for the last 8 years and is very efficient.
Brief Description of the problem:
Mr. Mohan wants to have the organization. He is fed up with organization politics. He is dissatisfied and
in fact frustrated. There are several reasons attachment to it. First and foremost is that he is not paid
adequately despite the fact that he has brought 12% growth in revenue to the company. Second reason is
that he is not consulted and constantly neglected while making decision on training aspects. Lastly, he
considers himself to be a victim of politics played in the organization. Production Manager
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
is constantly hurting him and interferes with the work. Dr. Ashok Sarao, boss of Mr. A.P. Mohan does
not want him to leave the organization, as he known that the effectively will come down if he leaves
Dr. Ashok tries to convince Mohan that he should adjust himself with the environment and also talk of
how Mohan is constantly neglected. He talks of how politics is played in the organization and
strengths and weaknesses of Mohan but does nothing to convince Mohan. Rather he says that they
have to adjust, as they are part of family run business. In this setting, personal equation rather than
merit works. Mohan is not convinced and says he is leaving.
Questions:
1. Why a high performer like Mr. Mohan decided to leave the organization he has been long part of?
2. Do you think Mr. A.P. Mohan took the right decision to leave the organization? What would you
have done if you were in his shoes?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each questions carry 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should from the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 

1. What do you mean by Quality of Work Life? Discuss the various techniques for improving
the Quality of work life with the principles of QWL?
2. Discuss the basic concepts of management development. What is the important of
management development in the changing business?
END OF SECTION C
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Industrial Relations & Labour Laws
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choices a  nd Short Notes type questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Workers participation in management decision-making is a highly________ concept.
a. Duplex
b. Complex
c. Simplex
d. None of the above
2. The origin of industrial relations in India can be traced in to the:
a. Second world war
b. First world war
c. Third world war
d. British rule
3. Under the payment of wages act, 1936, no wages period shall exceed for one.
a. Four month
b. Two month
c. One month
d. None of the above
4. Collective bargaining is the process of bargaining between________
a. employees & employer
b. workers & workers
c. employees & employees
d. None of the above
5. Layoff can also cause a ________
a. Retirement
b. Grievance
c. Conflict
d. None of the above
6. As per payment of bonus act, accounting year for a company is ________
a. One year
b. Period for which balance sheet is prepared
c. Period for which cash flow is prepared
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
d. Period for which profit and loss account is prepared
7. WPM stands for_________
a. Workers’ Participation in Management
b. Workers’ Payment of Management
c. Well fare Payment of Management
d. None of the above
8. Causes of Industrial disputes are_________
a. Economic causes
b. Political causes
c. Technological causes
d. All of the above
9. Trade unions of workers in an organization formed by workers to protect their________
a. Working condition
b. Interest
c. Both a & b
d. None of the above
10. A grievance causes in any organization are_________
a. Work environment
b. Supervision
c. Work group
d. All of the above
Part two:
1. What are the steps of Grievances handling Process? Explain it.
2. What are the objectives of ‘Industrial Relations’?
3. Briefly explain the term ‘evolution of Trade unions in India’.
4. Explain the ‘workers’ participation in management’.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
Case let 1
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
Star Automobiles Ltd. Pimpary is in the field of manufacturing of two wheelers. They manufacture and
market mopeds. These are available in the brand names ‘arrow’ and ‘double arrow’ where ‘arrow’ is
their traditional product and ‘double arrow’ is the improved version. The company was started about 20
yrs ago. Their product ‘arrow’ enjoys a reasonably good reputation and they were comfortable in the
market. However, with the entry of the new generation of fuel-efficient mopeds the company started
loosing its market. They immediately started developing the improved ‘double arrow’ but by the time
they came out with this new model the competitors had already strengthened their position in the
market. The arrow model was still acceptable by a segment of the market as it was cheapest vehicle.
‘Double arrow’ is new generation vehicle. It was costlier than Jet but its performance was much
superior. It is compared favorably with the competitors’ products; however it was yet to gain a foot hold
in the market.
The company had to refurbish the marketing activities in order to get back their market share. They
employed young sales engineer to launch a strong sales drive. Mr. Ramesh Tiwari, Btech and a diploma
holder in marketing got selected and was put on the job. Mr. Ramesh Tiwari started well in his new job.
He was given a territory to contact the prospective customers’ and to book the orders. The company had
introduced a new financial assistance scheme. Under this scheme, buyers were given easy loans. It was
particularly advantageous for group booking by employees working in an organization. Mr. Ramesh
Tiwari was able to contact people in different organization, arrange for group bookings and facilitate
the loans. His performance was good in the first year and in the second year of his service. The
company had its own system of rewarding those whose performance happened to be good. They usually
arranged a paid holiday trip for the good performer along with his wife. Mr. Ramesh Tiwari was
accordingly informed by the marketing manager to go to Chennai with his wife on company expenses.
Mr. Ramesh Tiwari asked him as to how much it would cost to the company. The marketing manager
calculated and told him that it would cost about 8000/-. He quickly asked him whether he could get that
8000/- in cash instead of the trip as he had better plans. The marketing manager countered this saying
that it might not be possible to doso. It was not the trading of the company, however he would check
with the personnel manager. After a couple of days, Mr. Tiwari was informed that it would not be
possible to give him a cash reward. Mr. Tiwari grudgingly went for the trip and returned. On his return,
he was heard complaining to one of his colleagues his little daughter was also along with him. The
marketing manager and the personnel manager thought he was a bit too fusy about the money and some
of his colleagues also thought so. During the subsequent days Mr. Ramesh Tiwari’s performance was
not all that satisfactory this showed his lukewarm attitude towards his job and the subordinates.
Questions:
1. Did the personnel manager handle the issue properly?
2. What is your recommendation to avoid such situations in future?
Case let 2
In 1950, with the enactment of the Insurance Act, Government of India decided to bring all the
insurance companies under one umbrella of the Life Insurance Corporation of India (LIC). Despite the
monopoly of LIC, the insurance sector was not doing well. Till 1995, only 12% of the country’s people
had insurance cover. The need for exploring the insurance market was felt and consequently the
Government of India set up the Malhotra Committee. On the basis of their recommendation, Insurance
Development and Regulatory Authority (IRDA) Act was passed in parliament in 2000. This moved
allowed the private insurers in the market with the strong foreign partners with 74:26% stakes. XYZMoon
life was one of the first three private players getting the license to operate in India in the year
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
2000. XYZ Moon life Insurance was a joint venture between the XYZ Group and Moon Inc. of US.
XYZ started off its operations in 1965, providing finance for industrial development and since then it
had diversified in to housing finance, consumer finance, mutual funds and now its latest venture was
Life Insurance. Its foreign partner Moon Inc. had its presence in Asia since the past 75 years catering to
over 1 million customers across 11Asian countries. Within a span of two years, twelve private players
obtained the license from IRDA.IRDA had provided certain base policies like, Endowment Policies,
Money back Policies, Retirement Policies, Team Policies, Whole Life Policies, and Health Policies.
They were free to customize their products by adding on the riders. In the year 2003, the company
becomes one of the market leaders amongst the private players. Till 2003, total market share of private
insurers was about 4%, but Moon Life was performing well and had the market share of about 30% of
the private insurance business. In June 2002, XYZ Moon Life started its operations at Nagpur with one
Sales Manager(SM) and ten Development Officers (DO). The role of a DO was to recruit the agents and
sell a career to those who have an inclination towards insurance and could work either on part time or
full time basis. They were very specific in recruiting the agents, because their contribution directly
reflected their performance. All DOs faced three challenges such as Case Rate (number of policies),
case size (amount of premium), and recruitment of advisors by natural market, personal observations,
nominators, and centre of influence. Incentive of offered by the company to development officers and
agents were based on their performance, which resulted in to internal competition and finally converted
into rivalry. In August 2002, a branch manager joined along with one more sales manager and ten
development officers. Initially, the branch was performing well and was able to build their image in the
local market. As the industry was dynamic in nature, there were frequent opportunities bubbling in the
market. In order to capitalize the outside opportunities, one sales manager left the organization in
January 2003. As the sales manager was a real performer, he was able to convince all the good
performers at XYZ Moon Life Insurance to join the new company. In april 2004, the company faceda
grave problem, when the Branch Manager left the organization for greener pastures. To fill the position,
in May 2004, the company appointed a new branch manager, Shashank Malik, and a sales manager,
Rohit pandey. The branch manager in his early mthirties had an experience of sales and training of
about 12 years and was looking after two branches i.e., Nagpur and Nasik. Malik was given one
Assistant Manager and 25 Development Officers. Out of that, ten were reporting to him. He was given
the responsibility of handling all the operations and the authority to make all the decisions, while
informing the Branch Manager. Malik opined that the insurance industry is a sunrise industry where
manpower plays an important role as the business is based on relationship. He wanted to encourage
one-to-one interaction, transparency and discipline in his organization. While managing his team, he
wanted his co-workers to analyze themselves i.e., to understand their own strengths and weaknesses. He
wanted them to be result-oriented and was willing to extend his full support. Finally, he wanted to
introduce weekly analysis in his game plan along with inflow of new blood in his organization. Using
his vast experience, he began informal interactions among the employees, by organizing outings and
parties, to inculcate the feelings of friendliness and belonging. He wanted to increase the commitment
level and integrity of his young dynamic team by facilitating proper channelization of their energy. He
believed that proper training could give his team a proper understanding of the business and the
dynamics of insurance industry.
Questions:
1. If you were Malik, what strategies would you adopt to solve the problem?
2. With high employee turnover in insurance industry, how can the company retain a person like Malik?
END F SECTION B
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists o  f Applied Theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 


1. What is the Collective Bargaining? Explain the Characteristics and types of Collective
Bargaining and write down the different levels of Collective Bargaining?
2. Discuss the wage policy in India with reference to detailed evaluation of the act.
END F SECTION C
S-2-300813
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Enterprise Resource Planning
Subject Code-C102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice questions & Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Enterprise Resource Planning is:
a. Computer System
b. Manufacturing organization
c. Method of effective planning of all the resources in an organization
d. None of the above
2. Enterprise Resource Planning vendors are those people:
a. Who are experts in administration and management of projects
b. Who have developed the ERP packages
c. Who uses the ERP system
d. None of the above
3. Interviewing and cost justification is tool and technique of:
a. Design step of ERP
b. Implementation step of ERP
c. Requirement analysis of ERP
d. Planning step of ERP
4. Support re-engineering processes to fit the software systems best practice is approach of:
a. Re-engineering approach
b. Customizing approach
c. Rational approach
d. None of the above
5. Process of tracking customer contacts and providing the customer with a price quote is:
a. Inventory sourcing
b. Sales order processing
c. Pre-sales
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. The difficulty in creating an audit trial of transactions when multiple transactions use multiple
database is associated with:
a. Product profitability sub-system
b. Finished goods inventory sub-system
c. Management reporting sub-system
d. Creating an audit trial sub-system
7. Differences occur between standard costs and actual costs is problem associated with:
a. Accounting
b. Production
c. Purchasing / Materials Management
d. None of the above
8. MRP in Enterprise resource planning stands for:
a. Maximum retail price
b. Material requirement planning
c. Management requirement planning
d. None of the above
9. Process of providing status of purchase order comes in a category of:
a. Purchase order follow-up
b. Source determination
c. Determine requirement
d. Invoice verification
10. Resource failure occurs when:
a. People clashes
b. Inability to communicate with the system user
c. Poor specification of requirements
d. Conflicts of people, time and project scope due to insufficient personnel
Part Two:
1. What are the advantages of the re-engineering method of implementing ERP?
2. What are the benefits reported from implementing ERP?
3. Write a short note on “Credit Management”.
4. Define Material Requirements Planning.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Tech Knowledge is a start-up founded in 1997 by Robert Thyer. The company is a distributer of
presentation technologies, including computer based projection systems, video equipment, and
display technologies. The firm has 25 employees and does $5 million in sales. It is growing rapidly.
The owner, Robert Thyer, would like to net source the back-office functions of the firm because the
company does not have an internal IT capability. The applications to be net sourced would include
sales and distribution, financial accounting, and inventory management.
Tech Knowledge would like to source SAP or another ERP vendor via a hosting arrangement. It
does not expect to do much customization, and it does not have any legacy systems.
Questions:
1. What factors should it use to evaluate each of these potential hosts?
2. What controls should be in place to monitor the hosting arrangement?
Caselet 2
ITM is a company specializing in network implementation and management. It provides networking
services to mid-sized companies, which do not have an internal networking analyst or IT, manager.
These organizations include real estate companies, law offices, medical practices, architectural /
engineering firms, construction companies, business services providers, country clubs, community
organizations, and churches.
ITM uses a legacy accounting system to handle its financial accounting and financial management
functions. It has added on a billing package for client services. The next step is to obtain a CRM
capability to manage information about current and prospective customers more effectively.
You have been assigned to identify potential sources for a net-sourcing arrangement with an ERP
vendor, which provides CRM capabilities.
Questions:
1. Identify potential sources of software.
2. Determine five criteria you will recommend be used to evaluate each of alternative providers.
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Explain in brief Sales and Marketing Modules in ERP System.
2. What are the different development process in ERP systems and write a detailed note on it?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Financial Management

Subject Code-B-103 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one: Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees, licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1 Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office of the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor for the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided to “work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This information seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank According to Gupta, the purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they could be collected. He explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash to purchase materials but his customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively new in the business, he did not feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or payment in advance. Instead, he could quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until completion of the job for payment. To show that his operation was sound, he included a list of customers and projects with his loan application. He also included a list of current receivables. Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In addition, he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank. Question: 1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a correct decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based products used in a variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and heavy manufacturing. In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are marketed by a wholly-owned subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters and warehouse facility in San Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume of $85 million in sales annually. About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle credit application and collections on 4,600 accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to $85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net 30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales. Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc., a wholesale supply dealer serving the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth and has grown steadily since that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and had no previous contact with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence International under the same terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent customers. Although Bajaj Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary operated independently and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s cost-accounting department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca Electronics. Bajaj Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that these percentages would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket expenses that were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the contact with Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area. James would
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would be paid whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in collecting any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur variable costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline, warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming that Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup on these sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the discount. If Neck Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the cost of financing the receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit from the account, Gupta was concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers could become bad debts at any time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever their accounts were overdue. His department probably spent three times as much money and effort managing a marginal account as compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and uncollected funds had to be financed by Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow – paying or marginal accounts were very costly to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind, Gupta began to review the credit application for Booth Plastics. Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 
1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive working capital.

Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management Examination Paper MM.100 Human Resource Management Subject Code-B102 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words). 
Caselet 1 Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationally-reputed institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000 more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview performance, and wished him good luck. Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr. Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company. After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities. So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on 25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter immediately, but dropped the idea later. Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Caselet 2
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly, changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations: like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment; greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past, Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the flight of talented employees
Question:- 1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 

1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?
END OF SECTION C


ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558

CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Organizational Behaviour

Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 • This section consists of Multiple Choice and short notes type questions   • Answer all the questions. 

• Part one carries 1 mark each and part two carries 5 marks each.

Part A:-

Multiple Choices:-

1. Which of the following is not comes under Maslow‟s needs theory?
1. Social needs
2. Affiliation needs
3. Physiological needs
4. Specification needs

2. Collegial model is an extension of:

a. Supportive model
b. Autocratic model
c. Custodial model
d. None of the above

3. Sigmund Freud‟s theory on personality is:
a. Related with moral values
b. Related with sexual values
c. Related with social values
d. Related with parental values

4. A person who moves fast, talk rapidly, usually impatient, measures success by quantity is a person of:
a. Class A personality type
b. Class B personality type
c. Class C personality type
d. Class AB personality type

5. According to Maslow‟s need hierarchy theory esteem need comes at________ position from bottom:
a. 2nd
b. 3rd
c. 4th

d. 5th

6. Informal communication is also called:
a. Grapevine

b. Red vine

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IIBM Institute of Business Management

Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour

c. Adams communication

d. Dead communication

7. Needs related to hunger, thirst, sleep etc. are considered as:

a. Safety needs
b. Physiological needs

c. Social needs
d. Self actualization needs

8. Horizontal expansion of a job that involves the addition of tasks at same level of skills:
a. Job enrichment

b. Job rotation
c. Job enlargement

d. Management by objectives

9. Path goal theory of leadership is developed by:

a. Robert R. Blake

b. Charles Bird
c. Fred fielder
d. Robert House

10. Potential or ability to influence others in a delivered direction is called:
a. Politics
b. Power
c. Motivation
d. Leadership

Part B:-
1. Define Bureaucracy.
2. State the concept of „Span of Control‟.
3. Wright a short note on classical conditioning learning theory of Ivan Pavlov.
4. What are the various stages of group development?

END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)

 • This section consists of Caselets. 
• Answer all the questions. 
• Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 

Caselet 1

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IIBM Institute of Business Management

Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour

M/s. ABC Ltd is a medium-sized engineering company producing a large-range of product lines according to customer requirements. It has earned a good reputation as a quick and reliable supplier to its customers because of which its volume of business kept on increasing. However, over the past one year, the Managing Director of the company has been receiving customer complaints due to delays in dispatch of products and at times the company has to pay substantial penalty for not meeting the schedule in time. The Managing Director convened an urgent meeting of various functional managers to discuss the issue. The marketing manager questioned the arbitrary manner of giving priority to products in manufacturing line, causing delays in wanted products and over-stocking of products which are not required immediately. Production Control Manager complained that he does not have adequate staff to plan and control the production function; and whatever little planning he does, is generally overlooked by shop floor manager. Shop floor managers complained of unrealistic planning, excessive machine breakdowns, power failure, and shortage of materials for scheduled products because of which it is impossible to stick to the schedule. Maintenance manager says that he does not get important spares required for equipment maintenance because of which he cannot repair machines at a faster rate. Inventory control manager says that on one hand the company often accuses him of carrying too much stock and on other hand people are grumbling over shortages. Fed up by mutual mud-slinging, the Managing Director decided to appoint you, a bright management consultant with training in business management to suggest ways and means to put his “house in order”.

Questions:-

1. What would you suggest to avoid delays in dispatch of products?

2. What action should be taken by various functional managers to meet the scheduled dates?

Caselet 2

Rajender Kumar was a production worker at competent Motors Limited (CML) which made components and accessories for the automotive industry. He had worked at CML for almost seven years as a welder, along with fifteen other men in the plant. All had received training in welding both on the job and through company sponsored external programmes. They had friendly relations and got along very well with one another. They played Volleyball in the playground regularly before retiring to the quarters allotted by the company. They work together in the company canteen, cutting Jokes on each other and making fun of everyone who dared to step into their privacy during lunch hour. Most of the fellows had been there for some length of time, except for two men who had joined the ranks only two months back. Rajender was generally considered to be the leader of the group, so it was no surprise that when the foreman of the new was transferred and his job was posted, Rajender applied for the job and got it.

There were only four other applicants for the job, two from mechanical section and two from outside, when there was a formal announcement of the appointment on a Friday afternoon, everyone in the group congratulated Rajender. They literally carried him on their shoulders, and bought him snacks and celebrated. On Monday morning, Rajender joined duty as Foreman. It was company practice for all foremen to wear blue jacket and a white shirt. Each man‟s coat had his name badge sewn onto the left side pocket. The company had given two pairs to Rajender. He was proud to wear the coat to work on Monday. People who saw him from a distance went up to him and admired the new blue coat. There was a lot of kidding around calling Rajender as „Hero‟, „Raja Babu‟ and „Officer‟ etc.

One of the guys went back to his locker and returned with a long brush and acted as though he were removing dust particles on the new coat. After about five minutes of horseplay, all the men went back to work. Rajender went to his office to familiarize himself with the new job and environment. At noon, all the men broke for Lunch and went to the canteen to eat and take a break as usual. Rajender was busy when they left but followed after them a few minutes later. He bought the food coupon, took the

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IIBM Institute of Business Management

Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour

snacks and tea and turned to face the open canteen. On the left-side corner of the room was his old work group; on the right-hand side of the canteen sat the other entire foreman in the plant—all in their smart blue coats.

At that point of time, silence descended on the canteen. Both groups looked at Rajender anxiously, waiting to see which group he would choose to eat with.

Questions:

1. Whom do you think Rajender will eat with? Why?

2. If you were one of the other foremen, what could you do to make Rajinder‟s transition easier?

END OF SECTION B

Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)

• This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.  • Answer all the questions. 

• Each question carries 15 marks. 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 

1. What are Psychological games & why people play these games?

2. A good leader is not necessarily a good manager.” Discuss this statement & compare leadership with management.

END OF SECTION C

Examination Paper of Principles and Practices of Management

Principles and Practices of Management
Subject Code-B101
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)

 • This section consists of multiples choice and short notes type questions 
• Part one carries 1 mark each & part two carries 5 marks each. 
• Attempt all questions 

Part One

Multiple Choices:

1. A plan is a trap laid to capture the ________
a. Future
b. Past
c. Policy
d. Procedure

2. Which of the following is the function for employing suitable person for the enterprise?
a. Organizing
b. Staffing
c. Directing
d. Controlling

3. ___________ means “ group of activities & employees into departments”:

a. Orientation

b. Standardization
c. Process
d. Departmentation

4. This theory states that authority is the power that is accepted by others:
a. Acceptance theory
b. Competence theory
c. Formal authority theory
d. Informal authority theory

5. Which of the following means dispersal of decision-making power to the lower levels of the organization?

a. Decentralization
b. Centralization
c. Dispersion
d. Delegation

6. This chart is the basic document of the organizational structure:

a. Functional chart
b. Posts chart

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Examination Paper of Principles and Practices of Management

c. Master chart
d. Departmental chart

7. Communication which flow from the superiors to subordinates with the help of scalar chain is known as:

a. Informal communication
b. Downward communication

c. Upward communication
d. Oral communication

8. Needs for belongingness, friendship, love, affection, attention & social acceptance are comes under___________

a. Physiological needs
b. Safety needs

c. Ego needs
d. Social needs

9. A management function which ensures “jobs to be filled with the right people, with the right knowledge, skill & attitude” is comes under__________

a. Staffing defined

b. Job analysis
c. Manpower planning
d. Recruitment

10. It is a process that enables a person to sort out issues and reach to a decisions affecting their life:
a. Selection
b. Raining
c. Reward
d. Counseling

Part Two:-

1. What do you understand by Maslow‟s Theory of Motivation?

2. Define Management By Objective.

3. Differentiate between co- ordination and co-operation.

4. Write a short note on „Acceptance theory‟.

END OF SECTION A

Section B: Caselets (40 marks)

 ••

This section consists of Caselets. 

Answer all the questions. 
Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 

Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).

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IIBM of Business Management

Examination Paper of Principles and Practices of Management

Caselet 1

Mr. Vincent, the Manager of a large supermarket, was taking a management course in the evening programme at the local college. The Professor had given an interesting but disturbing lecture the previous night on the various approaches to management. Vincent had always thought that management involved just planning, organizing and controlling. Now this Professor was saying that management could also be thought of as quantitative models, systems theory and analysis, and even something called contingency relationships. Vincent had always considered himself a good manager, and his record with the supermarket chain had proved it. He thought of himself, “I have never used operations research models, thought of my store as an open system, or developed or utilized any contingency relationship. By doing a little planning ahead, organizing the store, and making some things got done, I have been a successful manager. That other stuff just does not make sense. All the professor was trying to do was complicate things. I guess I will have to know it for the test, but I am sticking with my old plan, organize and control approach to managing my store.”

Questions:

1. Critically analyze Mr. Vincent‟s reasoning.

2. If you were the professor and you knew what was going through Vincent‟s mind, what would you say to Vincent?

Caselet 2

The Regional Administration Office of a company was hastily set up. Victor D‟Cuhna a young executive was directly recruited to take charge of Data Processing Cell of this office. The data processing was to help the administrative office in planning and monitoring. The officer cadre of the administrative office was a mix of directly recruited officers and promote officers (promotion from within the organization).

Females dominated the junior clerical cadre. This cadre was not formally trained. The administrative office had decided to give these fresh recruits on-the-job training because when results were not upto the expectations blame was brought on the Data Processing Cell. Victor D‟Cuhna realized that the administrative office was heading for trouble. He knew that his task would not be easy and that he had been selected because of his experience, background and abilities. He also realized that certain functional aspects of the administrative office were not clearly understood by various functionaries, and systems and procedures were blindly and randomly followed. Feedback was random, scanty and controversial, and Data Processing Cell had to verify every item of feedback. Delays were inevitable.

D‟Cuhna sought the permission of senior management to conduct a seminar on communication and feedback of which he was an expert. The permission was grudgingly given by the senior management.

Everyone appreciated the seminar. Following the first seminar, D‟Cuhna conducted a one week training course for the clerical cadre, especially for the junior, freshly recruited clerks. Amongst other

topics, D‟Cuhna laid emphasis onfiling system, information tracking, communication, and feedback. This helped reorient attitudes to some extent. But the female clerks preferred to ignore the theme and widely circulated the belief that D‟Cuhna was an upstart and a show off. Within a short time, considerable friction had been generated in the administrative office While directly recruited officers supported D‟Cuhna‟s initiative and the specialist officers admired him, senior management became cautious and uncomfortable. The junior promotee officers were prejudiced against him. The grand finale followed swiftly. D‟Cuhna happened to get annoyed with a female clerk. During the absence of her officer, who was on sick leave and had not been substituted by another officer, she began submitting nil returns. D‟Cuhna took pains to explain to her that for certain topics a nil feedback was

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not tenable. The current status had to be reported— the stage at which the matter was pending, what had been done, and what would be done about it? The lady reported that it was none of his business to tell her this. He should talk to her officer when the officer reports back from leave. D‟Cuhna said he would, but in the meanwhile she should present the correct picture. When D‟Cuhna called for the files, she refused to part with them. D‟Cuhna fired her and reported the situation to the Chief Regional Manager. The other ladies were up in the arms against D‟Cuhna. The lady also complained to higher management that D‟Cuhna had made passes at her. Other ladies supported her complaint. She also complained that D‟Cuhna had no business to scold her. D‟Cuhna countered that had there been a male clerk in her place he would have scolded him too. When females enjoyed equal rights with males,

D‟Cuhna felt he must remain impartial. Nevertheless, D‟Cuhna was transferred to another place. The transfer to another place, rather than to another department in same place, was particularly humiliating to him. A shocked and disillusioned D‟Cuhna quit the enterprise

Questions:

1. Diagnose the problem and enumerate the reasons for the failure of D‟Cuhna?

2. What could D‟Cuhna have done to avoid the situation in which he found himself?

END OF SECTION B

Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)

• This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 
• Answer all the questions. 
• Each question carries 15 marks. 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).

1. What are the common drawbacks in classical and Neo classical theories of management?

2. What is Training? Explain the different methods of training.

END OF SECTION C


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Human Resource Management

Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)

• This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.  • Answer all the questions. 

• Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.

Part One

Multiple Choices:

1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism

2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of those job requirements

a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation

c. Job circulation

d. Job description

3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972

4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job

a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition

d. None

5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring

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6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of future events

a. Planned change

b. Technology change

c. Structural change

d. None

7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals

a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system

8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale from low to high

a. Assessment centre

b. Checklist

c. Rating scale

d. Monitoring

9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an organization

a. Human resources

b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity

10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to achieve specific objectives

a. Executive development

b. Management game
c. Programmed learning

d. Understudy

Part Two:

1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?

2. List the various features of HRM.

3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?

4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.

END OF SECTION A

Section B: Caselets (40 marks)

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 • This section consists of Caselets. 
• Answer all the questions. 
• Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words). 

Caselet 1

Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationally-reputed institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000 more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview performance, and wished him good luck.

Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr. Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.

After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.

So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager

relieved him on 25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter immediately, but dropped the idea later.

Questions:

1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?

2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?

Caselet 2

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The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly, changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.

1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations: like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment; greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.

2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet changing customer needs and competitive pressures.

3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative career paths for such employees’

4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past, Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the flight of talented employees

Question:-

1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.

END OF SECTION B

Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)

• This section consists of applied theory Questions.  • Answer all the questions. 

• Each question carries 15 marks 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 



1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.

2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?

Examination Paper of Marketing Management

IIBM Institute of Business Management

Examination Paper MM.100

Subject Code- B104 Marketing Management

Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)

 • This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions. 
 • Answer all the questions. 
• Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.

Part One

Multiple Choices:

1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of customers.

a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing

2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or resale.

a. Environment analysis

b. Macro environment

c. Micro environment

d. Consumer

3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes& behavior.

a. Consumer behavior

b. Culture

c. Reference groups

d. Primary groups

4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known
as: a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching

c. Consumer adoption

d. Product

5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding

b. Packaging

c. Brand identity

d. Brand image

Examination Paper of Marketing Management

6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service.

a. Promotional pricing

b. Price discrimination

c. Non price competition

d. None of the above

7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the products of one producers.

a. End customer

b. Wholesaler

c. Retailing

d. Strategic channel alliance

8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of passengers of goods.

a. Logistics

b. Warehousing

c. Transportation

d. None of the above

9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build primary demands is known as:

a. Advertising

b. Informative advertising

c. Persuasive advertising

d. Advertising strategy

10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:

a. Compensation

b. Sales forecasting

c. Sales budgeting

d. Selling policy

Part Two:

1. Define Marketing Mix.

2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.

3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.

4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?

END OF SECTION A

Section B: Caselets (40 marks)

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Examination Paper of Marketing Management

 • This section consists of Caselets. 
• Answer all the questions. 
• Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
• Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 

Caselet 1

Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.

Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally, common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in 1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.

Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.

Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase, walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of

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Indian shoppers still prefer to pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over. Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families, kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The in-house wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations, though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).

Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With 60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor) in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique manner) are being aired.

The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text – or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far

totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.

Questions:

1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?

2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?

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Caselet 2

The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children.

Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible
games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the

Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in 70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside

developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eye-popping 64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were

between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adult-oriented material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the

number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of

1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999 with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals,

and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web, and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts

applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.

As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2 finitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an all-round entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment. However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube would not run

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Examination Paper of Marketing Management

on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video game player is

28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product, as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation
2, Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available. Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube. Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have high-speed access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional $39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299.

Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001 the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season, 6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when

Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to $199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.

Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent. The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in 2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega

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Examination Paper of Marketing Management

slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts). Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just 4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”.

Questions:

1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?

2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as email?

END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)

 • This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 
• Answer all the questions. 
• Each question carries 15 marks. 
 • Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 

1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product life cycle concept.

2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.


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Human Resource Management
Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of
those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
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6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
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Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
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Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the
position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?

Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code- B104 Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of
customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or
resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes&
behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as:
a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
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d. Brand image
6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or
service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the
products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of
passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build
primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Define Marketing Mix.
2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.
3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.
4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?
END OF SECTION A
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Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company
that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories
under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona
employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly
announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.
Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally,
common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s
wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The
concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping
experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an
investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing
campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and
five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange
happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were
women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to
include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in
1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi
and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit
customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that
organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground
rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how
the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an
outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign
retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail
companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the
world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.
Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the
store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was
trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail
management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was
internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management
institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even
restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the
latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive
membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by
invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest
names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai
and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted
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surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house
wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving
and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase,
walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch
and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to
pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over.
Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The
company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to
the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families,
kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry
the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The inhouse
wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to
work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop
lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable
designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and
Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations,
though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s
wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).
Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have
been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money
customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands
plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its
in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing
brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all
brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the
company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith
in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With
60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the
turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let
such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor)
in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the
shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole
experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique
manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text –
or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers
having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a
pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to
the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the
product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special
care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it
all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it
has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there
was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to
stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer
variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most
expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far
totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since
its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.
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Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
Caselet 2
The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a
crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different
companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of
computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega
surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per
cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children.
Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit
system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software
developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible
games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the
Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep
benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in
70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside
developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too
featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per
cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eyepopping
64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were
between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adultoriented
material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company
exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the
number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of
the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of
1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine
that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring
their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999
with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales
were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four
months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals,
and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end
of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its
momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the
functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser
were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web,
and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these
features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not
the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo
followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and
Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts
applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than
CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2
definitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is
able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an
enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to
gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy
access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability
to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an allround
entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment.
However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly
after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending
release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube
would not run on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would
be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the
company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want
to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers
and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its
extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario
Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video
game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their
handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to
ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they
were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product,
as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million
PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make
the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only
Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product
development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In
November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made
its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions
that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2,
Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This
open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option
of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the
advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of
the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready
when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available.
Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube.
Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an
Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network
on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches
and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have highspeed
access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of
households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open
network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees
charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional
$39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a
Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own
service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the
introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299.
Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less
than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001
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the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video
game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season,
6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million
Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when
Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to
$199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the
GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units
worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony
had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven
years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It
had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent
share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent.
The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast
comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in
2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware
components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more
than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for
PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles
have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the
consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit
margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed
by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts).
Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more
intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and
Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely
on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for
exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just
4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal
bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For
one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to
play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to
receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are
intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make
available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and
technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three
companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”.
Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as
email?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
8
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product
life cycle concept.
2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Caselet 1
M/s. ABC Ltd is a medium-sized engineering company producing a large-range of product lines
according to customer requirements. It has earned a good reputation as a quick and reliable supplier to
its customers because of which its volume of business kept on increasing. However, over the past one
year, the Managing Director of the company has been receiving customer complaints due to delays in
dispatch of products and at times the company has to pay substantial penalty for not meeting the
schedule in time. The Managing Director convened an urgent meeting of various functional managers
to discuss the issue. The marketing manager questioned the arbitrary manner of giving priority to
products in manufacturing line, causing delays in wanted products and over-stocking of products
which are not required immediately. Production Control Manager complained that he does not have
adequate staff to plan and control the production function; and whatever little planning he does, is
generally overlooked by shop floor manager. Shop floor managers complained of unrealistic
planning, excessive machine breakdowns, power failure, and shortage of materials for scheduled
products because of which it is impossible to stick to the schedule. Maintenance manager says that he
does not get important spares required for equipment maintenance because of which he cannot repair
machines at a faster rate. Inventory control manager says that on one hand the company often accuses
him of carrying too much stock and on other hand people are grumbling over shortages. Fed up by
mutual mud-slinging, the Managing Director decided to appoint you, a bright management consultant
with training in business management to suggest ways and means to put his “house in order”.
Questions:-
1. What would you suggest to avoid delays in dispatch of products?
2. What action should be taken by various functional managers to meet the scheduled dates?
Caselet 2
Rajender Kumar was a production worker at competent Motors Limited (CML) which made
components and accessories for the automotive industry. He had worked at CML for almost seven
years as a welder, along with fifteen other men in the plant. All had received training in welding both
on the job and through company sponsored external programmes. They had friendly relations and got
along very well with one another. They played Volleyball in the playground regularly before retiring
to the quarters allotted by the company. They work together in the company canteen, cutting Jokes on
each other and making fun of everyone who dared to step into their privacy during lunch hour. Most
of the fellows had been there for some length of time, except for two men who had joined the ranks
only two months back. Rajender was generally considered to be the leader of the group, so it was no
surprise that when the foreman of the new was transferred and his job was posted, Rajender applied
for the job and got it.
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
There were only four other applicants for the job, two from mechanical section and two from outside,
when there was a formal announcement of the appointment on a Friday afternoon, everyone in the
group congratulated Rajender. They literally carried him on their shoulders, and bought him snacks
and celebrated. On Monday morning, Rajender joined duty as Foreman. It was company practice for
all foremen to wear blue jacket and a white shirt. Each man‟s coat had his name badge sewn onto the
left side pocket. The company had given two pairs to Rajender. He was proud to wear the coat to
work on Monday. People who saw him from a distance went up to him and admired the new blue
coat. There was a lot of kidding around calling Rajender as „Hero‟, „Raja Babu‟ and „Officer‟ etc.
One of the guys went back to his locker and returned with a long brush and acted as though he were
removing dust particles on the new coat. After about five minutes of horseplay, all the men went back
to work. Rajender went to his office to familiarize himself with the new job and environment. At
noon, all the men broke for Lunch and went to the canteen to eat and take a break as usual. Rajender
was busy when they left but followed after them a few minutes later. He bought the food coupon,
took the snacks and tea and turned to face the open canteen. On the left-side corner of the room was
his old work group; on the right-hand side of the canteen sat the other entire foreman in the plant—all
in their smart blue coats.
At that point of time, silence descended on the canteen. Both groups looked at Rajender anxiously,
waiting to see which group he would choose to eat with.
Questions:
1. Whom do you think Rajender will eat with? Why?
2. If you were one of the other foremen, what could you do to make Rajinder‟s transition easier?

Caselet 1
Mr. Vincent, the Manager of a large supermarket, was taking a management course in the evening
programme at the local college. The Professor had given an interesting but disturbing lecture the
previous night on the various approaches to management. Vincent had always thought that
management involved just planning, organizing and controlling. Now this Professor was saying that
management could also be thought of as quantitative models, systems theory and analysis, and even
something called contingency relationships. Vincent had always considered himself a good manager,
and his record with the supermarket chain had proved it. He thought of himself, “I have never used
operations research models, thought of my store as an open system, or developed or utilized any
contingency relationship. By doing a little planning ahead, organizing the store, and making some
things got done, I have been a successful manager. That other stuff just does not make sense. All the
professor was trying to do was complicate things. I guess I will have to know it for the test, but I am
sticking with my old plan, organize and control approach to managing my store.”
Questions:
1. Critically analyze Mr. Vincent‟s reasoning.
2. If you were the professor and you knew what was going through Vincent‟s mind, what would you say
to Vincent?
Caselet 2
The Regional Administration Office of a company was hastily set up. Victor D‟Cuhna a young
executive was directly recruited to take charge of Data Processing Cell of this office. The data
processing was to help the administrative office in planning and monitoring. The officer cadre of the
administrative office was a mix of directly recruited officers and promote officers (promotion from
within the organization).
Females dominated the junior clerical cadre. This cadre was not formally trained. The administrative
office had decided to give these fresh recruits on-the-job training because when results were not upto
the expectations blame was brought on the Data Processing Cell. Victor D‟Cuhna realized that the
administrative office was heading for trouble. He knew that his task would not be easy and that he had
been selected because of his experience, background and abilities. He also realized that certain
functional aspects of the administrative office were not clearly understood by various functionaries,
and systems and procedures were blindly and randomly followed. Feedback was random, scanty and
controversial, and Data Processing Cell had to verify every item of feedback. Delays were inevitable.
D‟Cuhna sought the permission of senior management to conduct a seminar on communication and
feedback of which he was an expert. The permission was grudgingly given by the senior management.
Everyone appreciated the seminar. Following the first seminar, D‟Cuhna conducted a one week
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
training course for the clerical cadre, especially for the junior, freshly recruited clerks. Amongst other
topics, D‟Cuhna laid emphasis on
Questions:
1. Diagnose the problem and enumerate the reasons for the failure of D‟Cuhna?
2. What could D‟Cuhna have done to avoid the situation in which he found himself?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
1. What are the common drawbacks in classical and Neo classical theories of management?
2. What is Training? Explain the different methods of training.
S

Caselet 1
Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company
that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories
under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona
employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly
announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.
Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally,
common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s
wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The
concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping
experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an
investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing
campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and
five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange
happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were
women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to
include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in
1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi
and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit
customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that
organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground
rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how
the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an
outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign
retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail
companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the
world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.
Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the
store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was
trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail
management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was
internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management
institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even
restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the
latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive
membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by
invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest
names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai
and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house
wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving
and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase,
walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch
and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to
pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over.
Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The
company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to
the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families,
kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry
the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The inhouse
wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to
work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop
lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable
designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and
Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations,
though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s
wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).
Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have
been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money
customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands
plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its
in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing
brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all
brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the
company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith
in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With
60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the
turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let
such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor)
in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the
shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole
experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique
manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text –
or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers
having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a
pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to
the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the
product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special
care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it
all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it
has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there
was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to
stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer
variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most
expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far
totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since
its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
Caselet 2
The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a
crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different
companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of
computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega
surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per
cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children.
Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit
system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software
developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible
games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the
Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep
benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in
70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside
developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too
featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per
cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eyepopping
64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were
between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adultoriented
material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company
exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the
number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of
the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of
1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine
that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring
their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999
with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales
were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four
months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals,
and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end
of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its
momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the
functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser
were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web,
and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these
features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not
the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo
followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and
Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts
applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than
CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2
definitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
6
IIBM Institute of Business Management
because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is
able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an
enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to
gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy
access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability
to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an allround
entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment.
However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly
after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending
release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube
would not run on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would
be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the
company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want
to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers
and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its
extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario
Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video
game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their
handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to
ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they
were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product,
as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million
PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make
the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only
Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product
development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In
November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made
its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions
that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2,
Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This
open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option
of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the
advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of
the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready
when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available.
Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube.
Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an
Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network
on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches
and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have highspeed
access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of
households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open
network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees
charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional
$39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a
Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own
service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the
introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299.
Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less
than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
7
IIBM Institute of Business Management
the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video
game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season,
6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million
Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when
Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to
$199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the
GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units
worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony
had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven
years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It
had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent
share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent.
The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast
comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in
2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware
components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more
than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for
PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles
have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the
consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit
margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed
by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts).
Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more
intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and
Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely
on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for
exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just
4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal
bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For
one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to
play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to
receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are
intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make
available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and
technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three
companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”.
Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as
email?


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Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.


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Managerial Economics

MM.100 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & Short notes type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one: Multiple choices:
1. It is a study of economy as a whole.
a. Macroeconomics
b. Microeconomics
c. Recession
d. Inflation
2. A comprehensive formulation which specifies the factors that influence the demand for the product.
a. Market demand
b. Demand schedule
c. Demand function
d. Income effect
3. It is computed when the data is discrete and therefore incremental changes is measurable.
a. Substitution effect
b. Arc elasticity
c. Point elasticity
d. Derived demand
4. Goods & services used for final consumption is called:
a. Demand
b. Consumer goods
c. Producer goods
d. Perishable goods
5. The curve at which satisfaction is equal at each point.
a. Marginal utility
b. Cardinal measure of utility
c. The Indifference Curve
d. Budget line
6. Costs that are reasonably expected to be incurred in some future period or periods are:
a. Future costs
b. Past costs
Examination Paper of Managerial Economics
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c. Incremental costs
d. Sunk costs
7. Condition when the firm has no tendency either to increase or to contract its output:
a. Monopoly
b. Profit
c. Equilibrium
d. Market
8. Total market value of all finished goods & services produced in a year by a country’s residents is known as:
a. National income
b. Gross national product
c. Gross domestic product
d. Real GDP
9. The sum of net value of goods & services produced at market prices:
a. Government expenditure
b. Product approach
c. Income approach
d. Expenditure approach
10. The market value of all the final goods & services made within the borders of a nation in an year.
a. Globalization
b. Subsidies
c. GDP
d. GNP
Part Two:
1. Discuss the concept of Demand Schedule.
2. Explain the law of ‘Diminishing marginal returns’.
3. List the various forms of Market Structure.
4. What are the various methods of measuring national income?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Case let carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
Case let 1
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The war on drugs is an expensive battle, as a great deal of resources go into catching those who buy or sell illegal drugs on the black market, prosecuting them in court, and housing them in jail. These costs seem particularly exorbitant when dealing with the drug marijuana, as it is widely used, and is likely no more harmful than currently legal drugs such as tobacco and alcohol. There’s another cost to the war on drugs, however, which is the revenue lost by governments who cannot collect taxes on illegal drugs. In a recent study for the Fraser Institute, Canada, Economist Stephen T. Easton attempted to calculate how much tax revenue the government of the country could gain by legalizing marijuana. The study estimates that the average price of 0.5 grams (a unit) of marijuana sold for $8.60 on the street, while its cost of production was only $1.70. In a free market, a $6.90 profit for a unit of marijuana would not last for long. Entrepreneurs noticing the great profits to be made in the marijuana market would start their own grow operations, increasing the supply of marijuana on the street, which would cause the street price of the drug to fall to a level much closer to the cost of production. Of course, this doesn’t happen because the product is illegal; the prospect of jail time deters many entrepreneurs and the occasional drug bust ensures that the supply stays relatively low. We can consider much of this $6.90 per unit of marijuana profit a risk-premium for participating in the underground economy. Unfortunately, this risk premium is making a lot of criminals, many of whom have ties to organized crime, very wealthy. Stephen T. Easton argues that if marijuana was legalized, we could transfer these excess profits caused by the risk premium from these grow operations to the government: If we substitute a tax on marijuana cigarettes equal to the difference between the local production cost and the street price people currently pay – that is, transfer the revenue from the current producers and marketers (many of whom work with organized crime) to the government, leaving all other marketing and transportation issues aside we would have revenue of (say) $7 per [unit]. If you could collect on every cigarette and ignore the transportation, marketing, and advertising costs, this comes to over $2 billion on Canadian sales and substantially more from an export tax, and you forego the costs of enforcement and deploy your policing assets elsewhere. One interesting thing to note from such a scheme is that the street price of marijuana stays exactly the same, so the quantity demanded should remain the same as the price is unchanged. However, it’s quite likely that the demand for marijuana would change from legalization. We saw that there was a risk in selling marijuana, but since drug laws often target both the buyer and the seller, there is also a risk (albeit smaller) to the consumer interested in buying marijuana. Legalization would eliminate this risk, causing the demand to rise. This is a mixed bag from a public policy standpoint: Increased marijuana use can have ill effects on the health of the population but the increased sales bring in more revenue for the government. However, if legalized, governments can control how much marijuana is consumed by increasing or decreasing the taxes on the product. There is a limit to this, however, as setting taxes too high will cause marijuana growers to sell on the black market to avoid excessive taxation. When considering legalizing marijuana, there are many economic, health, and social issues we must analyze. One economic study will not be the basis of Canada’s public policy decisions, but Easton’s research does conclusively show that there are economic benefits in the legalization of marijuana. With governments scrambling to find new sources of revenue to pay for important social objectives such as health care and education expect to see the idea raised in Parliament sooner rather than later. Questions:
1. Plot the demand schedule and draw the demand curve for the data given for Marijuana in the case above.
2. On the basis of the analysis of the case above, what is your opinion about legalizing marijuana in Canada?
Case let 2
Examination Paper of Managerial Economics
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The Stock Market The stock market is very close to a perfect competitive market. The price of a stock usually is determined by the market forces of demand and supply of the stock and individual buyers and sellers of the stock have little effect on price (they are price-takers). Resources are mobile as stock is bought and sold frequently. Information about prices and quantities is readily available. Funds flow into stocks and resources flow into uses in which the rate of return. Thus stock prices provide the signal for efficient allocation of investment in the economy. However, imperfections occur here also though the stock market is very close to a perfect competition, for example, sale of huge amount of stocks by a large corporation will certainly affect (depress) the price of its stocks. Question 1. Find out the characteristic of National Stock Exchange.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. What do you understand by Monitory Policy? Discuss roles and functions of RBI.
2. What is the concept of law of demand? Discuss Elasticity of Demand in detail.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Project Management Certification
Guidelines for paper
 Total No. of Questions is 100.
 The minimum passing marks is 50%.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
 Answer all the Questions.
Multiple Choices:
1. A_______ is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service or result.
a) Program
b) Process
c) Project
d) Portfolio
2. Which of the following is not a potential advantage of using good project management?
a) Shorter development times
b) Higher worker morale
c) Lower cost of capital
d) Higher profit margins
3. Which of the following is not an attribute of a project?
a) Projects are unique
b) Projects are developed using progressive elaboration
c) Projects have a primary customer or sponsor
d) Projects involve little uncertainty
4. Which of the following is not part of the triple constraint of project management?
a) Meeting scope goals
b) Meeting time goals
c) Meeting communications goals
d) Meeting cost goals
5. The first stage of any project is
a) Proposal
b) Conceptualization
c) Implementation
d) Management
6. __________is the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to
meet project requirements.
a) Project Management
b) Program Management
c) Project portfolio Management
d) Requirement Management
Examination Paper of Project Management Certification
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7. Project portfolio management addresses __________goals of an organization, while project
management addresses _________goals.
a) Strategic, tactical
b) Tactical, strategic
c) Internal, external
d) External, internal
8. Several application development projects done for the same functional group might best
be managed as part of a____________
a) Portfolio
b) Program
c) Investment
d) Collaborative
9. Which of the following is not one of the top ten skills or competencies of an effective
project manager?
a) People skills
b) Leadership
c) Integrity
d) Technical skills
10. What is the certification program called that the Project Management Institute provides?
a) Microsoft Certified Project Manager (MCPM)
b) Project Manager Professional (PMP)
c) Project Management Expert (PME)
d) Project Management Mentor (PMM)
11. A___________ is a series of actions directed towards a particular result.
a) Goal
b) Process
c) Plan
d) Project
12. Processes include coordinating people and other resource to carry out
the project plans and produce the products, service, or results of the project or phase.
a) Initiating
b) Planning
c) Executing
d) Monitoring & controlling
13. Which process group normally requires the most resources and time?
a) Initiating
b) Planning
c) Executing
d) Monitoring and controlling
14. A work breakdown structure, project schedule, and cost estimates are outputs of the process.
a) Initiating
b) Planning
c) Executing
d) Monitoring and controlling
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15. Which process group includes activities from each of the nine knowledge areas?
a) Initiating
b) Planning
c) Executing
d) Monitoring and controlling
16. Project management as a profession is almost unique in having institutions concerned with
its development who promote what they term their
a) Body of language
b) Body of knowledge
c) Strategy
d) Work
17. Initiating involves developing a project charter and preliminary project scope statement, which
are part of the project_____________ management knowledge.
a) Integration
b) Scope
c) Communications
d) Risk
18. A__________ describes how things should be done, and different organizations often have
different ways of doing things.
a) Regulation
b) Process
c) Standard
d) Methodology
19._________ involves measuring progress toward project objectives and talking corrective actions.
a) Initiating
b) Planning
c) Executing
d) Monitoring and controlling
20. What type of report do project teams create to reflect on what went right with the project?
a) Lessons – learned report
b) Status report
c) Final project report
d) Business case
21. Project manager is responsible for_________
a) Overseeing change
b) Cross functional activities
c) Ever changing set of tasks
d) All above
22. Many people use to have a standard format for preparing various project
management documents.
a) Methodologies
b) Templates
c) Project management software
d) Standards
23. What is the last step in the four – stage planning process for selecting information
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technology projects?
a) Information technology strategy planning
b) Business area analysis
c) Project planning
d) Resource allocation
24. A new government law requires an organization to report data in anew way. Under which category
would a new information system project to provide this data fall?
a) Problem
b) Opportunity
c) Directive
d) Regulation
25. A_________ is a document that formally recognizes the existence of a project and provides
direction on the project‟s objectives and management.
a) Project charter
b) Preliminary scope statement
c) Business case
d) Project management plan
26. ICOM model, which is one of the major roles of project manager, stand for__________
a) Integrated Constraint of Mechanism
b) Inputs, Outputs, Constraints & Mechanism
c) Inputs, Outputs, Constraints & Money
d) None
27. A_________ often includes sensitive information, so it should not be part of the overall project
plan for anyone to see.
a) Business case
b) Project charter
c) Personnel chart
d) Stakeholder analysis
28. Which of the following is not a suggestion for performing integrated change control?
a) Use good configuration management
b) Minimize change
c) Establish a formal change control system
d) View project management as a process of constant communication and negotiation
29. refer(s) to all the work involved in creating the products of the projects and
processes used to create them.
a) Deliverables
b) Milestones
c) Scope
d) Product development
30. Assume you have a project with major categories called planning, analysis, design, and
testing. What level of the WBS would these items fall under?
a) 0
b) 1
c) 2
d) 3
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31. Which of the following is not a best practice that can help in avoiding scope problems
on information technology projects?
a) Keep the scope realistic
b) Use off-the-shelf hardware and software whenever possible
c) Follow good project management processes
d) Don‟t involve too many users in scope management
32. Having ascertains the portfolio of projects obtained objectives for each of them, we have to
move to the next stage of the strategy process to balance the objectives
a) Policy deployment
b) Strategy matrix
c) Project performance measurement
d) None
33. What major restaurant chain terminated a large project after spending $170 million on it,
primarily because they realized the project scope was too much to handle?
a) Burger King
b) Pizza Hut
c) McDonalds
d) Taco Bell
34. Scope___________ is often achieved by a customer inspection and then sign- off on
key deliverables.
a) Verification
b) Validation
c) Completion
d) Close – out
35. Project management software helps you ________ which serves as a develop a basis
for creating Gantt charts, assigning resources, and allocating costs.
a) Project plan
b) Schedule
c) WBS
d) Deliverable
36. WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) is also known as _________
a) Chunking
b) Unbundling
c) Both (a) & (b)
d) None
37. What is the first process in planning a project schedule?
a) Milestone definition
b) Activity definition
c) Activity resource estimation
d) Activity sequencing
38. Predecessors, successes, logical relationships, leads and lags, resource requirements, constraints,
imposed dates, and assumptions are all examples of .
a) Items in an activity list
b) Items on a Gantt chart
c) Milestone attributes
d) Activity attributes
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39. As the project manager for a software development project, you are helping to develop its
schedule. You decide that writing code for a system cannot start until sign off on the
analysis work. What type of dependency is this?
a) Technical
b) Mandatory
c) Discretionary
d) External
40. You cannot start editing a technical report until someone else completes the first draft. What
type of dependency does this represent?
a) Finish – to – start
b) Start – to – start
c) Finish – to – finish
d) Start – to – finish
41. ___________ Involves going through the cycle several times to test the effects of the changes
make on the outcomes.
a) Planning
b) Strategy
c) Iterative
d) None
42.
A B
1 2
3
5Days 7Days
Above figure shows two activities A & B; B cannot start until A finished and the times for A
& B are 5 and 7 days respectively. This logic is known as
a) Dependency
b) Precedence
c) Freedom
d) None
43.
10
A
20
5Days
In the above figure calculate the EET (earliest event time) at 20.
a) 10
b) 20
c) 5
d) 25
44. What symbol on a Gantt chart represents a slipped milestone?
a) A black arrow
b) A white arrow
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c) A black diamond
d) A white diamond
45. What type of diagram shows planned and actual project schedule information?
a) A network
b) A Gantt chart
c) A Tracking
d) A milestone chart
46.____________ is a network diagramming technique used to predict total project duration.
a) PERT
b) A Gantt chart
c) Critical path method
d) Crashing
47. Which of the following statement is false?
a) “Growing grass” was on the critical path for a large theme park project.
b) The critical path is the series of activities that determine the earliest time by which
a project can be completed.
c) A forward pass through a project network diagram determines the early start and
early finish dates for each activity.
d) Fast tracking is a technique for marking cost and schedule trade-offs to obtain
the obtain the greatest amount of schedule comparison for the least incremental
cost.
48. ____________ is a method of scheduling that considers limited resources when creating a
project schedule and includes buffers to protect the project completion date.
a) Parkinson‟s Law
b) Murphy‟s Law
c) Critical path analysis
d) Critical chain scheduling
49.___________ is a resource scarified or foregone to achieve a specific objective or
something given up in exchange.
a) Money
b) Liability
c) Trade
d) Cost
50. What is main goal of project cost management?
a) To complete a project for as little cost as possible
b) To complete a project within an approved budget
c) To provide truthful and accurate cost information on projects
d) To ensure that an organization‟s money is used widely
51. A fundamental of „Theory of Constraints‟ (TOC) is to manage systems by focusing on the
constraints, termed as
a) Watermark
b) Bottleneck
c) Tick-sheet
d) None
52. “An activity will expand to fill the time available”; it is
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a) Newton‟s Law
b) Parkinson‟s Law
c) Einstein‟s Law
d) None
53. Which of the following is not a key output of project cost management?
a) A cost estimate
b) A cost management plan
c) Updates to the cost management plan
d) A cost baseline
54. If a company loses $5 for every $100 in revenue for a certain product, what is profit margin
for that product?
a) -5 percent
b) 5 percent
c) -$5
d) $5
55.________reserves allow for future situations that are unpredictable.
a) Contingency
b) Financial
c) Management
d) Baseline
56. You are preparing a cost estimate for a building based on its location, purpose, number of
square feet, and other characteristics. What cost estimating technique are you using?
a) Parametric
b) Analogous
c) Bottom – up
d) Top – down
57.________ involves allocating the project cost estimate to individual work items over time.
a) Reserve analysis
b) Life cycle costing
c) Project cost budgeting
d) Earned value analysis
58._________ is a project performance measurement technique that integrates scope time,
and cost data.
a) Reserve analysis
b) Life cycle costing
c) Project cost budgeting
d) Earned value analysis
59. If the actual cost for a WBS item is $1500 and its earned value was $2000, what is its
cost variance, and is it under or over budget?
a) The cost variance is -$500, which is over budget
b) The cost variance is -$500, which is under budget
c) The cost variance is $500, which is over budget
d) The cost variance is $500, which is under budget
60. If a project is halfway completed and its schedule performance index is 110% and its
cost performance index is 95%, how is it progressing?
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a) It is ahead of schedule and under budget
b) It is ahead of schedule and over budget
c) It is behind schedule and under budget
d) It is behind schedule and over budget
61. To determine the cost of particular element in advance of the project, which technique can be
employed?
a) Parametric estimating
b) As…………but…………s
c) Forecasts
d) All above
62._________is the degree to which a set of inherent characteristics fulfills requirements.
a) Quality
b) Conformance to requirements
c) Fitness for use
d) Reliability
63. What is the purpose of project quality management?
a) To produce the highest quality products and services possible
b) To ensure that appropriate quality standards are met
c) To ensure that the project will satisfy the needs for which it was undertaken
d) All of the above
64.__________ generates ideas for quality improvements by comparing specific project
practices or product characteristics to those of other projects or products within or outside
the performing organization.
a) Quality audits
b) Design of experiments
c) Six Sigma
d) Benchmarking
65. What tool could you use to determine whether a process is in control or out of control?
a) A cause – and – effect diagram
b) A control chart
c) A run chart
d) A scatter chart
66. Complication to the critical path represents the formation of compound series of activities
often involving different paths which has been termed
a) The critical chain
b) The critical path
c) TOC
d) Resource path
67. Six Sigma‟s target for perfection is the achievement of no more than defects,
errors, or mistakes per million opportunities.
a) 6
b) 9
c) 3.4
d) 1
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68. The seven run rule states that if seven data points in a row on a control chart are all below the
mean, above the means, or all increasing or decreasing, then the process needs to be examined
for ___________ problems.
a) Random
b) Non – random
c) Six Sigma
d) Quality
69. What is the preferred order for performing testing on information technology projects?
a) Unit testing, integration testing, system testing, user acceptance testing
b) Unit testing, system testing, integration testing, user acceptance testing
c) Unit testing, system testing, user acceptance testing, integration testing
d) Unit testing, integration testing, user acceptance testing, system testing
70. is known for his work on quality control in Japan and developed the 14
points for Management in his text Out of the Crisis.
a) Juran
b) Deming
c) Crosby
d) Ishikawa
71. The theory of constraints (TOC) is successfully applied in___________
a) Planning
b) Checking
c) Manufacturing
d) Controlling
72. PMI‟s OPM3 is an example of a model or framework for helping
organization improve their processes and systems.
a) Benchmarking
b) Six Sigma
c) Maturity
d) Quality
73. Which of the following is not part of project human resource management?
a) Resource estimating
b) Acquiring the project team
c) Developing the project team
d) Managing the project team
74.____________ causes people to participate in an activity for their own enjoyment.
a) Intrinsic motivation
b) Extrinsic motivation
c) Self motivation
d) Social motivation
75. At the bottom of Maslow‟s pyramid or hierarchy of needs are_________ needs.
a) Self – actualization
b) Esteem
c) Safety
d) Physiological
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76._________ power is based on a person‟s individual charisma.
a) Affiliation
b) Referent
c) Personality
d) Legitimate
77. What technique can you use to resolve resource conflicts by delaying tasks?
a) Resource loading
b) Resource leveling
c) Critical path analysis
d) Over allocation
78. Which of the following is not a tool or technique for managing project team?
a) Observation and conversation
b) Project performance appraisals
c) Issue logs
d) Social Styles Profile
79. What do many experts agree is the greatest threat to the success of any project?
a) Lack of proper funding
b) A failure to communicate
c) Poor listening skills
d) Inadequate staffing
80. Which communication skill is most important for information technology professionals for
career advancement?
a) Writing
b) Listening
c) Speaking
d) Using communication technologies
81. Which of the following is not a process in project communication management?
a) Information planning
b) Information distribution
c) Performance reporting
d) Managing stakeholders
82. A building may not be constructed unless the planning permission for it has been obtained, this
is the.
a) Legal constraint
b) Quality constraint
c) Cost constraint
d) Logic constraint
83. A__________ report describes where the project stands at a specific point in time.
a) Status
b) Performance
c) Forecast
d) Earned value
84.____________ is an uncertainly that can have a negative or positive effect on meeting
project objectives.
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a) Risk utility
b) Risk tolerance
c) Risk management
d) Risk
85. A person who is a risk -________receives greater satisfaction when more payoffs is at
stake and is willing to pay a penalty to take risks.
a) Averse
b) Seeking
c) Neutral
d) Aware
86. Which risk management process involves prioritizing based on their probability and impact
of occurrence?
a) Risk management planning
b) Risk identification
c) Qualitative risk analysis
d) Quantitative risk analysis
87. The 7-S framework of project management issues was promoted by____________
a) McJonald and Co.
b) McKinsly and Co.
c) J & K Co.
d) None
88. Your project involves using a new release of a software application, but if that release is not
available, your team has__________ plans to use the current release.
a) Contingency
b) Fallback
c) Reserve
d) Mitigation
89. A risk__________ is a document that contains results of various risk management
processes, often displayed in a table or spreadsheet format.
a) Management plan
b) Register
c) Breakdown structure
d) Probability / impact matrix
90. Your project team has decided not to use an upcoming release of software because it might
cause your schedule to slip. Which negative risk response strategy are you using?
a) Avoidance
b) Acceptance
c) Transference
d) Mitigation
91. For non critical activities, network diagrams build in __________ at the start of activities.
a) Temporary
b) Buffer
c) Slack
d) Anywhere
Examination Paper of Project Management Certification
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IIB M Institute of Business Management
92. If a project being undertaken by a particular project team, then these are referred as________
a) Resource capability
b) Resource capacity
c) Resource calendar
d) Resource pool
93. The term ‘hedgehog syndrome’ means_______
a) Management problem
b) Solving problem
c) Repetition of problem
d) Find out a problem
94. What is the first procurement process?
a) Planning contracting
b) Planning purchasing and acquisitions
c) Requesting seller responses
d) Procurement management planning
95. The_________ is the point at which the contractor assumes total responsibility for each
additional dollar of contract cost.
a) A breakeven point
b) Share ratio point
c) Point of reconciliation
d) Point of total assumption
96. We‟re standing on this hill here. We want to be on that hill over there, this is________
a) View
b) Vision
c) Mission
d) Aim
97. A_________ is a document prepared by a seller when there are different approaches for meeting
buyer needs.
a) RFP
b) RFQ
c) Proposal
d) Quote
98. Buyers often prepare a list when selecting a seller to make this __________ process
more manageable.
a) Preferred
b) Short
c) Qualified suppliers
d) BAFO
99. A proposal evaluation sheet is an example of a (n).
a) RFP
b) NPV analysis
c) Earned value analysis
d) Weighted scoring model
Examination Paper of Project Management Certification
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IIB M Institute of Business Management
100. is a term used to describe various procurement functions that are
now done electronically.
a) E – procurement
b) eBay
c) E – commerce
d) EMV
S-2-200314


ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING IIBM MBA EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING IIBM MBA EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Enterprise Resource Planning
Subject Code-C102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice questions & Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Enterprise Resource Planning is:
a. Computer System
b. Manufacturing organization
c. Method of effective planning of all the resources in an organization
d. None of the above
2. Enterprise Resource Planning vendors are those people:
a. Who are experts in administration and management of projects
b. Who have developed the ERP packages
c. Who uses the ERP system
d. None of the above
3. Interviewing and cost justification is tool and technique of:
a. Design step of ERP
b. Implementation step of ERP
c. Requirement analysis of ERP
d. Planning step of ERP
4. Support re-engineering processes to fit the software systems best practice is approach of:
a. Re-engineering approach
b. Customizing approach
c. Rational approach
d. None of the above
5. Process of tracking customer contacts and providing the customer with a price quote is:
a. Inventory sourcing
b. Sales order processing
c. Pre-sales
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. The difficulty in creating an audit trial of transactions when multiple transactions use multiple
database is associated with:
a. Product profitability sub-system
b. Finished goods inventory sub-system
c. Management reporting sub-system
d. Creating an audit trial sub-system
7. Differences occur between standard costs and actual costs is problem associated with:
a. Accounting
b. Production
c. Purchasing / Materials Management
d. None of the above
8. MRP in Enterprise resource planning stands for:
a. Maximum retail price
b. Material requirement planning
c. Management requirement planning
d. None of the above
9. Process of providing status of purchase order comes in a category of:
a. Purchase order follow-up
b. Source determination
c. Determine requirement
d. Invoice verification
10. Resource failure occurs when:
a. People clashes
b. Inability to communicate with the system user
c. Poor specification of requirements
d. Conflicts of people, time and project scope due to insufficient personnel
Part Two:
1. What are the advantages of the re-engineering method of implementing ERP?
2. What are the benefits reported from implementing ERP?
3. Write a short note on “Credit Management”.
4. Define Material Requirements Planning.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Tech Knowledge is a start-up founded in 1997 by Robert Thyer. The company is a distributer of
presentation technologies, including computer based projection systems, video equipment, and
display technologies. The firm has 25 employees and does $5 million in sales. It is growing rapidly.
The owner, Robert Thyer, would like to net source the back-office functions of the firm because the
company does not have an internal IT capability. The applications to be net sourced would include
sales and distribution, financial accounting, and inventory management.
Tech Knowledge would like to source SAP or another ERP vendor via a hosting arrangement. It
does not expect to do much customization, and it does not have any legacy systems.
Questions:
1. What factors should it use to evaluate each of these potential hosts?
2. What controls should be in place to monitor the hosting arrangement?
Caselet 2
ITM is a company specializing in network implementation and management. It provides networking
services to mid-sized companies, which do not have an internal networking analyst or IT, manager.
These organizations include real estate companies, law offices, medical practices, architectural /
engineering firms, construction companies, business services providers, country clubs, community
organizations, and churches.
ITM uses a legacy accounting system to handle its financial accounting and financial management
functions. It has added on a billing package for client services. The next step is to obtain a CRM
capability to manage information about current and prospective customers more effectively.
You have been assigned to identify potential sources for a net-sourcing arrangement with an ERP
vendor, which provides CRM capabilities.
Questions:
1. Identify potential sources of software.
2. Determine five criteria you will recommend be used to evaluate each of alternative providers.
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Enterprise Resource Planning
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Explain in brief Sales and Marketing Modules in ERP System.
2. What are the different development process in ERP systems and write a detailed note on it?

Examination Paper of Financial Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Financial Management
Subject Code-B-103
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the
stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees,
licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment
proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Financial Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the
management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the
constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of
the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through
diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Financial Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case
On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office
of the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan
department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in
person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had
considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor
for the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided
to “work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This
information seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank
According to Gupta, the purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they
could be collected. He explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash to
purchase materials but his customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively
new in the business, he did not feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or
payment in advance. Instead, he could quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until
completion of the job for payment. To show that his operation was sound, he included a list of
customers and projects with his loan application. He also included a list of current receivables.
Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had
financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In
addition, he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank.
Question:
1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company
Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a
correct decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based
products used in a variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and
heavy manufacturing. In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are
marketed by a wholly-owned subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters
and warehouse facility in San Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume
of $85 million in sales annually. About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by
Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle
credit application and collections on 4,600 accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to
$85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net 30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the
Examination Paper of Financial Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales.
Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc., a wholesale supply dealer serving
the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth and has grown steadily since
that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and had no previous contact
with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence International under the same
terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent customers. Although Bajaj
Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary operated independently
and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s cost-accounting
department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca Electronics. Bajaj
Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that these percentages
would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket expenses that
were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the contact with
Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area. James would
receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would be paid
whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in collecting
any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur variable
costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline,
warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead
approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential
profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming
that Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup
on these sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the
discount. If Neck Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the
cost of financing the receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit
from the account, Gupta was concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers
could become bad debts at any time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever
their accounts were overdue. His department probably spent three times as much money and effort
managing a marginal account as compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and
uncollected funds had to be financed by Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow –
paying or marginal accounts were very costly to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind,
Gupta began to review the credit application for Booth Plastics.
Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth
Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of
credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Financial Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 5
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while
determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive
working capital.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Information Technology
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Information Technology & Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. It means data that have been processed in a form that is meaningful and useful to the user.
a. Data
b. Information
c. System
d. None of the above
2. BCR stands for____________
a. Bar code reader
b. Basic code reader
c. Business code reader
d. None of the above
3. Which of the following comes under output devices?
a. Printer
b. Speaker
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None
4. A trackball is a stationary device related to the_______
a. Keyboard
b. Joystick
c. Mouse
d. All of the above
5. ___________is a volatile memory and everything disappears if power goes off or is turned off
abruptly in the middle of work.
a. RAM
b. ROM
c. CDROM
d. None of the above
6. IC stands for____________
a. Integrated Circuit
b. Information Circuit
Examination Paper of Information Technology
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Interrelated Circuit
d. None of the above
7. DSS stands for____________
a. Decision Support System
b. Direction Support System
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
8. How many characters uses the MICR system?
a. 15 characters
b. 18 characters
c. 24 characters
d. 14 characters
9. One Megabyte contains:
a. 1000 KB
b. 1000 Bytes
c. 1000 MB
d. None of the above
10. The smallest element of data is called_______
a. Byte
b. Bit
c. Giga byte
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Write a note on „Cache Memory‟.
2. List the different types of information systems.
3. Write a short note on „Value Chain Analysis‟
4. Discuss peer- to – peer model in distributed computing system.
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
END OF SECTIONA
Examination Paper of Information Technology
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
It began as a trading site for nerds, the newly jobless, home-bound housewives, and bored retirees to
sell subprime goods: collectibles and attic trash. But eBay (www.ebay.com) quickly grew into a
teeming marketplace of 30 million, with its own laws and norms, such as a feedback system in
which buyers and sellers rate each other on each transaction. When that wasn‟t quite enough, eBay
formed its own police force to patrol the listings for fraud and kick out offenders. The company even
has something akin to a bank: Its Paypal payment-processing unit allows buyers to make electronic
payments to eBay sellers who can‟t afford a merchant credit card account. “eBay is creating a
second, virtual economy,” says W. Brian Arthur, an economist at think tank Santa Fe Institute. “It‟s
opening up a whole new medium of exchange.” eBay‟s powerful vortex is drawing diverse
products and players into its profitable economy, driving its sellers into the heart of traditional
retailing, a $2 trillion market. Among eBay‟s 12 million daily listings are products from giants such
as Sears Roebuck, Home Depot, Walt Disney, and even IBM. More than a quarter of the offerings
are listed at fixed prices. The result, says Bernard H. Tenenbaum, president of a retail buyout firm, is
“They„re coming right for the mainstream of the retail business.” So what started out as a pure
consumer auction market-place is now also becoming a big time business-to-consumer and even
business-to-business bazaar that is earning record profits for eBay‟s stockholders. And as the eBay
economy expands, CEO Meg Whitman and her team may find that managing it could get a lot
tougher, especially because eBay‟s millions of passionate and clamorous users demand a voice in all
major decisions. This process is clear in one of eBay‟s most cherished institutions: the voice of the
Customer program. Every couple of months, the executives of eBay bring in as many as a dozen
sellers and buyers, especially its high selling “Power Sellers,” to ask them questions about how they
work and what else eBay needs to do. And at least twice a week, it holds hour-long teleconferences
to poll users on almost every new feature or policy, no matter how small. The result is that users
feel like owners, and they take the initiative to expand the eBay economy – often beyond
management‟s wildest dreams. Stung by an aerospace down-turn, for instance, machine-tool shop
Reliable Tools Inc., tried listing a few items on eBay in late 1998. Some were huge, hulking chunks
of metal, such as a $7,000 2,300-pound milling machine. Yet they sold like ice cream in August.
Since then, says Reliable‟s auction manager, Richard Smith, the company‟s eBay business has
“turned into a monster.” Now the Irwindale (California) shop‟s $1 million in monthly eBay sales
constitutes 75% of its overall business. Pioneers such as Reliable promoted eBay to set up an
industrial products marketplace in January that‟s on track to top $500 million in gross sales this
year.Then there is eBay Motors. When eBay manager Simon Rothman first recognized a market for
cars on cars on eBay in early 1999, he quickly realized that such high-ticket items would require a
different strategy than simply opening a new category. To jump-start its supply of cars and
customers, eBay immediately bought a collector-car auction company, Kruse International, for $150
million in stock, and later did a deal to include listings from online classifieds site, AutoTrader.com.
Rothman also arranged insurance and warranty plans, an escrow service, and shipping and
inspection services.This approach worked wonder. Sales of cars and car parts, at a $5 billion-plus
annual clip, are eBay’s single largest market. That has catapulted eBay in front of No. 1 U.S. auto
dealer AutoNation in number of used cars sold. About half of the sellers are brick-and-mortar dealers
who now have a much larger audience than their local area. “eBay is by far one of my better sources
for buyers,” says Bradley Bonifacius, Internet sales director at Dean Stallings Ford in Oak Ridge,
Tennessee. And for now, the big corporations, which still account for under 5 percent of eBay‟s
gross sales, seem to be bringing in more customers then they steal. Motorola Inc., for example,
helped kick off a new wholesale business for eBay last year, selling excess and returned cell phones
in large lots. Thanks to the initiative of established companies such as Motorola, eBay‟s wholesale
business jumped ninefold, to $23 million, in the first quarter.As businesses on eBay grow larger,
they spur the creation of even more businesses. A new army of merchants, for example, is making a
business out of selling on eBay for other people. From almost none a couple of years ago, these so
called Trading Assistants now number nearly 23,000. This kind of organic growth makes it
Examination Paper of Information Technology
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
exceedingly though to predict how far the eBay economy can go. Whitman professes not to know.
“We don‟t actually control this,” she admits. “We are not building this company by ourselves. We
have a unique partner – million of people.”
Questions:
1. Why has eBay become such a successful and diverse online marketplace? Visit the eBay website
to help you answer, and check out their many trading categories, specialty sites, international
sites, and other features.
2. Why do you think eBay has become the largest online/offline seller of used cars, and the largest
online seller of certain other products, like computers and photographic equipment?
Caselet 2
It‟s no secret that somewhere in a back room in the typical Fortune 500 company, there‟s a team of
analytical wizards running sophisticated data mining queries that mine for gems such as data about
about the company‟s best customers – those top 20 percent of clients that produce 80 percent of the
company‟s profits. These jewels can be a business‟s most valuable intellectual property, which
makes them very valuable to competitors. What‟s to prevent that data set from walking out the door
or falling into the wrong hands? Sometimes, not much. Many companies lack the internal controls to
prevent that information from leaking. The problem is that such data is as hard to protect as it is to
find. Owens & Minor Inc. (www.ownes-minor.com), a $4 billion medical supplies distributor,
counts some of the nation‟s largest health care organizations among its customers. In late 1996, it
started mining data internally using business intelligence software from Business Objects SA. “From
the beginning, we were aware of security issues around this strategic information about our
operations,” says Don Stoller, senior director of information systems at Owens & Minor. “For
example, a sales executive in Dallas should only have access to analyses from his region.” It is
always possible that someone who has legitimate access will abuse that trust, but companies can
minimize that potential by strictly limiting access to only those who need it. thus, Owens & Minor
uses role-level security functions that clearly define who has access to which data. “This meant we
had to build a separate security table in our Oracle database,” says Stoller. A few years later, when
the company wanted to open its systems to suppliers and customers, security became even more
important. In 1998, Owens & Minor moved quickly to take advantage of Web-intelligence software
from Business Objects that‟s designed to Web-enable business intelligence systems. The result was
Wisdom, an extranet Web portal that lets Owens & Minor‟s suppliers and customers access their
own transactional data and generate sophisticated analyses and reports from it.“It business-tobusiness
transactions, security is key,” says Stoller. “We had to make absolutely sure that Jhonson &
Jhonson, for example, could not see any 3M‟s information. This meant we had to set up specific
customer and supplier security tables, and we had to maintain new, secured database views using the
Oracle DBMS and Business Objects.”Wisdom was such a success that Owens & Minor decided to
go into the intelligence business with the launch of wisdom2 in the spring of 2000. “We capture data
out of a hospital‟s materials management system and load it into our data warehouse,” Stoller
explains. A hospital can then make full use of its business-intelligence software to mine and analyze
purchasing data. Owens & Minor receives a licensing and maintenance fee for the services.Layers of
security and encryption require a considerable amount of overhead data for systems administration.
Both Stoller and Michael Rasmussen, an analyst at Giga Information Group, say that‟s the main
reason security concerns about business intelligence are often swept under the carpet. The issues of
authentication (identifying the user) and authorization (what things the user is allowed to do) must
be addressed, usually across different applications, Rasmussen says, adding, “Systems
Examination Paper of Information Technology
5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
administration can be a real nightmare.”“We are going through some of this,” says David Merager,
director of Web services and corporate applications at Vivendi Universal Games Inc.
(www.vugames.com). “Our business intelligence needs more security attention.” Business
intelligence reports come from two systems: an Oracle-based for budgets on a Microsoft SQL Server
database. The heart of the business intelligence system consists of Microsoft‟s OLAP application
and software from Comshare Inc. that provides the Web-based front end for the analytics. “Our
budget teams use these reports to do real-time analyses,” says Merager. Rodger Sayles, manager
of data warehousing at Vivendi Universal, says one way to secure such a system is to assign roles to
all users within the Microsoft application. Roles determine precisely what a user is allowed to see
and do and are usually managed within a directory. If your computing architecture is amenable to a
single, centralized directory that supports roles, this may be an attractive solution. “The problem is
that once you have over 40 distinct roles, you run into performance issues, and we have identified
about 70 user roles,” Sayles explains. He says there‟s way around this difficulty. “I think we are
going to use a combination of Web portals and user roles. A user would sign on through a particular
Web portal, which would effectively place the user in a role category. This reduces the overhead
burden on the application,” says Sayles.
Questions:
1. Why have developments in IT helped to increase the value of the data resources of many
companies?
2. How can companies use IT to meet the challenges of data resources security?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Explain distributed systems. What are the advantages and disadvantages of distributed systems?
2. What do you mean by database? List the different types of database model.
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTIONC


PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT IIBM EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED

PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT IIBM EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
CONTACT:
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Production and Operations Management

Subject Code-B107 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Production and Operations Management concerns itself with the conversion of:
a. Outputs in to inputs
b. Inputs in to outputs
c. Outputs in to outputs
d. None of the above
2. Continuous Production is
a. The last operation to the finished product
b. The first operation to the finished product
c. The mid operation to the finished product
d. None of the above
3. Independent demand is
a. Demand that is controlled by the company
b. Demand that is controlled by the customer
c. Demand that is not controlled by the company
d. All of the above
4. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has been defined as a
a. Complete Enterprise wide business solution
b. Complete Enterprise narrow business solution
c. a & b
d. None of the above
5. CAD stands for
a. Computer Architecture Design
b. Computer Aided Design
c. Computer Aided Drafting
d. All of the above
6. Delphi method is the most widely used and accurate method of
a. Demand forecasts
b. Exponential forecasts
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Technological forecasts
d. All of the above
7. JIT/Kanban systems help eliminate __________
a. Increase the number of products
b. Increase the amount of raw materials
c. Increase the amount of energy
d. All of the above
8. PPSCS stands for
a. Project Planning Scheduling & Control System
b. Project Planning Sequencing & Control System
c. Production Planning Scheduling & Control System
d. None of the above
9. Process layout is also known as.
a. Group layout
b. Line layout
c. Product layout
d. Functional layout
10. Time study is a ______ technique for recording the times and rate of working
a. Standard times
b. Work measurement
c. Allowances
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define Job Shop Production.
2. What do you understand by „Quality Control‟?
3. What do you mean by materiel handling?
4. Define ABC analysis.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1
Company Background
The Bronson Insurance Group was originally founded in 1900 in Auxvasse, Missouri, by James Bronson.
The Bronson Group owns a variety of companies that underwrite personal and commercial insurance
policies. Annual sales of the Bronson Group are $100 million. In recent years, the company has suffered
operating losses. In 1990, the company was heavily invested in computer hardware and software. One of
the problems the Bronson Group faced (as well as many insurance companies) was a conflict between
established manual procedures and the relatively recent (within the past 20 years) introduction of
computer equipment. This conflict was illustrated by the fact that much information was captured on
computer but paper files were still kept for practical and legal reasons.
File Clerks
The file department employed 20 file clerks who pulled files from stacks, refilled used files, and delivered
files to various departments including commercial lines, personal lines, and claims. Once a file clerk
received the file. Clerks delivered files to underwriters on an hourly basis throughout the day. The average
file clerk was paid $8,300 per year. One special file clerk was used full time to search for requested files
that another file clerk had not been able to find in the expected place. It was estimated that 40 percent of
the requested files were these “no hit” files requiring a search. Often these “no hit” files were eventually
found stacked in the requester‟s office. The primary “customers” of the file clerks were underwriters and
claims attorneys.
Underwriting
Company management and operations analysts were consistently told that the greatest problem in the
company was the inability of file clerks to supply files in a speedy fashion. The entire company from top to
bottom viewed the productivity and effectiveness of the department as unacceptable. An underwriter used
20-50 files per day. Because of their distrust of the files department, underwriters tended to hoard often
used files. A count by operations analysts found that each underwriter kept from 100-200 files in his or her
office at any one time. An underwriter would request a file by computer and work on other business until
the file was received. Benson employed 25 underwriters.
Management Information System
Upper management was deeply concerned about this problem. The MIS department had suggested using
video disks as a possible solution. A video disk system was found that would be sufficient for the
companies needs at a cost of about $12 million. It was estimated that the system would take two years to
install and make compatible with existing information systems. Another, less attractive was using
microfilm. A microfilm system would require underwriters to go to a single keyboard to request paper
copies of files. The cost of a microfilm system was $5 million.
Questions:
1. What do you recommend? Should the company implement one of the new technologies, if yes,
why?
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
2. An operations analyst suggested that company employees shared a “dump on the clerks”
mentality. Explain.
Caselet 2
Harrison T. Wenk III is 43, married, and has two children, ages 10 and 14. He has a master‟s degree
in education and teachers junior high school music in a small town in Ohio. Harrison‟s father passed
away two months ago, leaving his only child an unusual business opportunity. According to his
father‟s will, Harrison has 12 months to become active in the family food-catering business, Kare-
Full Katering, Inc., or it will be sold to two key employees for a reasonable and fair price. If Harrison
becomes involved, the two employees have the option to purchase a significant, but less than
majority, interest in the firm. Harrison‟s only involvement with this business, which his grandfather
established, was as an hourly employee during high school and college summers. He is confident that
he could learn and perhaps enjoy the marketing side of the business, and that he could retain the longtime
head of accounting/finance. But he would never really enjoy day-to-day operations. In fact, he
doesn‟t understand what operations management really involves. In 1991 Kare-Full Katering, Inc. had
$3.75 million in sales in central Ohio. Net profit after taxes was $ 105,000, the eleventh consecutive
year of profitable operations and the seventeenth in the last 20 years. There are 210 employees in this
labor-intense business. Institutional contracts account for over 70 percent of sales and include partial
food services for three colleges, six commercial establishments) primarily manufacturing plants and
banks), two long -term care facilities, and five grade schools. Some customer location employs a
permanent operations manager; others are served from the main kitchens of Kare-Full Katering.
Harrison believes that if he becomes active in the business, one of the two key employees, the vice
president of operations, will leave the firm. Harrison has decided to complete the final two months of
this school year and then spend the summer around Kare-Full Katering – as well as institutions with
their own food services – to assess whether he wants to become involved in the business. He is
particularly interested in finding out as much as possible about operations. Harrison believes he owes
it to his wife and children to fairly evaluate this opportunity.
Questions:
1. Prepare a worksheet of operations activities that Harrison should inquire about this summer.
2. If you were Harrison, what would you do? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This Section Consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What do you mean by Tactical Planning? What are the mathematical approaches to aggregate
planning?
2. What is the concept of forecasting in operation? List the different types of forecasting methods.
END OF SECTION C
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Organizational Behaviour
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and short notes type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and part two carries 5 marks each.
Part A:-
Multiple Choices:-
1. Which of the following is not comes under Maslow‟s needs theory?
1. Social needs
2. Affiliation needs
3. Physiological needs
4. Specification needs
2. Collegial model is an extension of:
a. Supportive model
b. Autocratic model
c. Custodial model
d. None of the above
3. Sigmund Freud‟s theory on personality is:
a. Related with moral values
b. Related with sexual values
c. Related with social values
d. Related with parental values
4. A person who moves fast, talk rapidly, usually impatient, measures success by quantity is a person
of:
a. Class A personality type
b. Class B personality type
c. Class C personality type
d. Class AB personality type
5. According to Maslow‟s need hierarchy theory esteem need comes at__________ position from
bottom:
a. 2nd
b. 3rd
c. 4th
d. 5th
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Informal communication is also called:
a. Grapevine
b. Red vine
c. Adams communication
d. Dead communication
7. Needs related to hunger, thirst, sleep etc. are considered as:
a. Safety needs
b. Physiological needs
c. Social needs
d. Self actualization needs
8. Horizontal expansion of a job that involves the addition of tasks at same level of skills:
a. Job enrichment
b. Job rotation
c. Job enlargement
d. Management by objectives
9. Path goal theory of leadership is developed by:
a. Robert R. Blake
b. Charles Bird
c. Fred fielder
d. Robert House
10. Potential or ability to influence others in a delivered direction is called:
a. Politics
b. Power
c. Motivation
d. Leadership
Part B:-
1. Define Bureaucracy.
2. State the concept of „Span of Control‟.
3. Wright a short note on classical conditioning learning theory of Ivan Pavlov.
4. What are the various stages of group development?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
M/s. ABC Ltd is a medium-sized engineering company producing a large-range of product lines
according to customer requirements. It has earned a good reputation as a quick and reliable supplier to
its customers because of which its volume of business kept on increasing. However, over the past one
year, the Managing Director of the company has been receiving customer complaints due to delays in
dispatch of products and at times the company has to pay substantial penalty for not meeting the
schedule in time. The Managing Director convened an urgent meeting of various functional managers
to discuss the issue. The marketing manager questioned the arbitrary manner of giving priority to
products in manufacturing line, causing delays in wanted products and over-stocking of products
which are not required immediately. Production Control Manager complained that he does not have
adequate staff to plan and control the production function; and whatever little planning he does, is
generally overlooked by shop floor manager. Shop floor managers complained of unrealistic
planning, excessive machine breakdowns, power failure, and shortage of materials for scheduled
products because of which it is impossible to stick to the schedule. Maintenance manager says that he
does not get important spares required for equipment maintenance because of which he cannot repair
machines at a faster rate. Inventory control manager says that on one hand the company often accuses
him of carrying too much stock and on other hand people are grumbling over shortages. Fed up by
mutual mud-slinging, the Managing Director decided to appoint you, a bright management consultant
with training in business management to suggest ways and means to put his “house in order”.
Questions:-
1. What would you suggest to avoid delays in dispatch of products?
2. What action should be taken by various functional managers to meet the scheduled dates?
Caselet 2
Rajender Kumar was a production worker at competent Motors Limited (CML) which made
components and accessories for the automotive industry. He had worked at CML for almost seven
years as a welder, along with fifteen other men in the plant. All had received training in welding both
on the job and through company sponsored external programmes. They had friendly relations and got
along very well with one another. They played Volleyball in the playground regularly before retiring
to the quarters allotted by the company. They work together in the company canteen, cutting Jokes on
each other and making fun of everyone who dared to step into their privacy during lunch hour. Most
of the fellows had been there for some length of time, except for two men who had joined the ranks
only two months back. Rajender was generally considered to be the leader of the group, so it was no
surprise that when the foreman of the new was transferred and his job was posted, Rajender applied
for the job and got it.
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
There were only four other applicants for the job, two from mechanical section and two from outside,
when there was a formal announcement of the appointment on a Friday afternoon, everyone in the
group congratulated Rajender. They literally carried him on their shoulders, and bought him snacks
and celebrated. On Monday morning, Rajender joined duty as Foreman. It was company practice for
all foremen to wear blue jacket and a white shirt. Each man‟s coat had his name badge sewn onto the
left side pocket. The company had given two pairs to Rajender. He was proud to wear the coat to
work on Monday. People who saw him from a distance went up to him and admired the new blue
coat. There was a lot of kidding around calling Rajender as „Hero‟, „Raja Babu‟ and „Officer‟ etc.
One of the guys went back to his locker and returned with a long brush and acted as though he were
removing dust particles on the new coat. After about five minutes of horseplay, all the men went back
to work. Rajender went to his office to familiarize himself with the new job and environment. At
noon, all the men broke for Lunch and went to the canteen to eat and take a break as usual. Rajender
was busy when they left but followed after them a few minutes later. He bought the food coupon,
took the snacks and tea and turned to face the open canteen. On the left-side corner of the room was
his old work group; on the right-hand side of the canteen sat the other entire foreman in the plant—all
in their smart blue coats.
At that point of time, silence descended on the canteen. Both groups looked at Rajender anxiously,
waiting to see which group he would choose to eat with.
Questions:
1. Whom do you think Rajender will eat with? Why?
2. If you were one of the other foremen, what could you do to make Rajinder‟s transition easier?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. What are Psychological games & why people play these games?
2. A good leader is not necessarily a good manager.” Discuss this statement & compare leadership
with management.
END OF SECTION C
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Human Resource Management
Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of
those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the
position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?
END OF SECTION C
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International Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. International marketing includes activities that direct the flow of goods from:
a. One country to one country
b. One country to another country
c. One country to multiple country
d. All of the above
2. ETC stands for______________
a. Expert trading companies
b. Essential trading companies
c. Export trading companies
d. None of the above
3. Till 1950-56 there was no clear exim policy and no __________ restrictions of any kind.
a. Import
b. Export
c. Both a) & b)
d. None of the above
4. Tariffs have been one of the classical methods of regulating ___________ trade.
a. International
b. National
c. Domestic
d. None of the above
5. The world trade organization (WTO) was established on 1st January____________
a. 1996
b. 1995
c. 1997
d. None of the above
6. Export documentation is a very important area in ___________ management.
a. International
b. Import
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Answer Type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
c. Export
d. None of the above
7. Methods of export pricing are_____________
a. Cost plus pricing
b. Competitive pricing
c. Marginal pricing
d. All of the above
8. OCED has been a destination of a major portion of ___________exports.
a. Japan
b. USA
c. India
d. UK
9. Psychographic segmentation involves grouping people in terms of:
a. Attitudes
b. Life styles
c. Values
d. All of the above
10. Foreign direct investment would be permitted up to __________ in the development of the
zones.
a. 100%
b. 90%
c. 38%
d. 48%
Part Two:
1. Differentiate between domestic & international marketing.
2. Write a short note on World trade organization (WTO).
3. Briefly describe the exim policy of India (one part of India‟s export import policy).
4. Write a short note on tariff and non tariff barriers of international trade.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150to 200).
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
Caselet 1
Export Marketing:
The trade in black pepper is unhappy that exports may not show a sign of revival in prices in the
immediate future. World prices have been showing a downward trend for eighteen months and this has
resulted in much lower earnings for exporters. The UK, West Germany and the Netherlands have cut
their import requirement though the American demand has shown some growth. Brazil has been
resorting to aggressive selling at lower prices and the expectations are that its exports will reach an alltime
peak of 32,000 tones in the 1981-82 season. The 1981-82 Indian season is only about six weeks
away. The Brazilian offensive has forced India to withdraw so to any from the US and West European
markets and increase its reliance on communist buyers. As many as 1980-81.the Soviet Union alone
accounting for 12,647 tones. But exporters are concerned at the diversion on such a scale of this trade.
Questions:
1. Had you been the pepper exporter, what would be your short term and medium-term export
marketing strategy in the above environment?
2. Could you examine the weak points in this case study?
Caselet 2
SMART KIDS – SELLING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND
RESOURCES TO THE WORLD
Smart Kids Ltd. An Auckland company that makes educational games and resources to read and
understand math‟s has won a Trade New Zealand Export Award for its success in international markets
in 2003.Established eight years ago in the family home basement, Smart Kids is led by husband and
wife team, joint chief executives David and Sun Milne and their sons Duncan and Frase. She Milne, an
ex-teacher, says from just 30 products when it started, the company produces more than 200 produces
catering for student‟s activities, grammar concepts and numeracy. She says the international appeal of
Smart Kids products was highlighted recently, when company‟s SMART PHONICS was listed amongst
the top five products out of almost 100 in the education trade show in the United Kingdom. The key
requirement for every new Smart Kids products is that it stimulates student‟s minds in the classroom,
teaches them a specific concept easily, enjoyably and permanently and enables problem solving. David
Milne says Smart Kids started selling its educational games and resources to New Zealand schools in
1995, drawings an immediate and strong response. It quickly became apartment that the New Zealand
market was not large enough to sustain considerable investment in product development, and secondly,
that their products have done so well that they deserved wider exposure.”Our export research came
down to two options. Find educational distributors in other countries or set-up our own operations. The
first option was less risky and easy to manage but it meant that Smart Kids products were lost in a wide
range of materials. So we went for the second option and over the next few years established offices in
Australia, in UK and Canada”. This has successfully branded Smart Kids as a leading supplier of
educational resources in these countries. Mr. Milne says the Smart Kids product catalogue is now sent
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
regularly to teachers in more than 50,000 schools across the UK, Ireland, Canada and Australia. “We
also sell to schools in the US. In that market we elected to work through a distributor, we didn‟t have
the financial resources to set-up an operation that could cover almost 70,000 schools and compete with
every established educational publisher”. He says annual exports now exceed $2.2 million and account
for more than 90% of turnover. In order to grow the business, surplus profits are reinvested back into
product development, infrastructure – the company recently moved its Auckland operation into new
20,000 square feet premises in Ellerslie. Mr. Milne says the Smart Kids brand is now well established
internationally with the company enjoying many competitive advantages, including its New Zealand
origin. New Zealand education is highly regarded overseas and we find that international teachers to get
hold of educational products made in this country.
Questions:
1. What are the major considerations for a firm in order to while deciding its markets entry
strategy?
2. To what extent direct control and ownership are critical for Smart kids export distribution
strategy?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied theory.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. What do mean by International marketing? Discuss the scope of International marketing.
2. Describe the export documentation framework in India in detail.
END OF SECTION C
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Research Methodology
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Answer Type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 marks each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Research is an art of ____________ investigation.
a. Technological
b. Scientific
c. Political
d. None of the above
2. Exploratory research is flexible and very ___________ research.
a. Variable
b. Visuals
c. Versatile
d. None of the above
3. Frame error, chance error and response error are collectively called____________
a. Total error
b. Non sampling error
c. Sampling error
d. Universal error
4. Hypothesis testing is sometimes called ____________ analysis.
a. Exploratory data
b. Confirmatory data
c. Experimental data
d. Both a) & b)
5. Execution of the project is a very important step in the ____________ process.
a. Questions
b. Identification
c. Research
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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6. Thurstone scale is also known as ____________ scale.
a. Equal appearing interval
b. Equal alternatives interval
c. Equal alternatives item
d. None of the above
7. A ratio in which the units of numerator & denominator are not the same is termed as a:
a. Class
b. Rate
c. Data
d. None of the above
8. ANOVA stands for______________
a. Analysis of automobiles
b. Analysis of variable
c. Analysis of variance
d. None of the above
9. One tailed & two tailed test are the part of ____________ test.
a. Null
b. Hypothesis
c. Alternative
d. None of the above
10. Chi – square is an important ____________ test.
a. Parametric
b. Probability
c. Non – parametric
d. None the above
Part Two:
1. What is „Sequential sampling‟?
2. Write a short note on „nominal scale‟.
3. Write a note on „Z – Test‟. (One of the parametric test for hypothesis).
4. What are the cautions to be taken on χ2 (chi square) test?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Swastika Computer System was established in 1981 at Delhi to provide computer training. In 1980s
computer education was relatively new in India. Personal computers 286 existed and MS DOS was the
operating system. Languages like Basic, Pascal, COBOL, FORTRAN were used in programming.
Swastika Computer Systems was established with their support departments namely computer
assembly, faculty training and computer servicing department. In the first financial year, it recorded a
turnover of Rs 11.5 lakhs. Within a few years of its existence, Swastik Computer System opened its
branches in eight major cities of India and had a gross annual turnover of Rs 86 lakhs. The organization
was highly centralized. The head office at Delhi handled all accounts, recruitment, and placement of
students and servicing of computers. The Bhopal branch of Swastik Computer Systems was set up in
May 1987. The branch was headed by a dynamic branch manager Hemant Gupta. He was a BSc in
computers and had previously worked in the data processing department of a manufacturing concern.
To establish the Bhopal branch, Hemant Gupta realized the need for making Swastik Computer
Systems, Bhopal known to the younger generation. With this in mind he introduced some innovative
promotional schemes like offering scholarships to students doing well in the intelligence tests
administered by the branch, giving personal computers to students to deposit term fees at their
convenience. Hemant Gupta also ensured that teaching standards were high and computers at the
branch were well maintained, so a student once enrolled felt that he had made the right decision by
joining Swastik Computer Systems. He also made himself available from 8.00 am to 7.00 p.m at the
branch. Students were free to go to him with their problems, which he took pains to solve. Soon
Swastik Computer Systems was one of the leading computer training centres in Bhopal. As the Bhopal
branch prospered, the head office at Delhi started taking an active interest in the running of this branch.
The Regional Manager who visited Bhopal once a month started making frequent visits. During one of
his visits, his attention was drawn to rumors that branch funds were being misappropriated. When the
Regional Manager informed the Delhi office about the rumor, a team was sent to the Bhopal Branch to
look into the matter. On investigation, the term was convinced that the rumors had some truth in them.
It was found that a larger number of students attended the classes than were enrolled. It was felt that this
fraud was not possible without the consent of Hemant Gupta, and without any further inquiry a decision
was taken to remove him forthwith. Amit Verma who was a senior faculty at Swastik Computer
Systems, Delhi was asked to take over the Bhopal branch as Manager. He was an MCA and had been
associated with the organization since its inception. Amit Verma‟s appointment at Bhopal was
welcomed at the Bhopal branch by both, staff and faculty as he had the reputation of being an easy
going person. After he joined the Bhopal, it was observed that Amit Verma, although academically
sound, was not an effective administrator. His approach towards staff and faculty was lenient. He was
not particular about punctuality and was not available during office hours. This had an adverse effect on
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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faculty in general and classes in particular. Not only did classes suffer but even administrative work
was affected. Monthly reports to the head office were not sent on time, as a result requisitions for
computer servicing, reading material and funds were unduly delayed. Due to lack of maintenance,
computer breakdowns became common, students did not receive their reading material on time and
payment of building rent, and telephone bills etc were unnecessarily delayed. The symptoms of
deterioration at the Bhopal branch were obvious. The branch which had an annual turnover of Rs 30.7
lakhs fell to Rs. 4 lakhs. As enrollments decreased the head office at Delhi started feeling the pinch. It
started delaying transfer of funds to the Bhopal branch. As a result faculty salaries were unduly delayed.
The faculty started leaving for greener pastures.
Worried by the number of faculty turnover, the head office started a practice of recruiting only
those faculties willing to sign a bond of 3 years. The organization started a practice of taking a deposit
of Rupees 5000 from the joining faculty, which would be refunded after 3 years. In case the faculty left
before this duration, the deposit stood forfeited. This policy further reduced the quality of faculty
joining Swastik Computer Systems, Bhopal.
Questions:
1. What according to you went wrong at the Bhopal branch?
2. What can be done to revive the Bhopal branch?
Caselet 2
Mind tree which was founded in 1999 in India by a group of IT professionals who wanted to chart a
somewhat distinctive path. Today, it has a top line of $269 million and is rated as one of the most
promising mid-sized IT services companies. Creditable as that is, Mind Tree does not want to be just
that. There is an element of serendipity about what it has been doing over the last year. In 2008, it
designated one of its founders Subroto Bagchi „Gardener‟, a gimmicky signal, intended to declare that
he was moving out of the day-to-day running of the company to nurture talent which would run the
company in the future. He has now a report card ready on a year as gardener. During this one year, he
has also spent around 45 days travelling round the world talking to clients and prospective ones which
has yield remarkable insights into what firms are doing in these traumatic times. Lastly, Mind Tree as
a whole has spent the last year going through the exercise of redefining its mission statement and
vision for the next five years. Quite fortuitously these processes have come together with a unifying
thread, presenting a coherent big picture. Mind Tree wants to seed the future while still young, and
executive chairman Ashok Soota has declared that by 2020, it will be led by a non-founder. So a year
ago the gardener Bagchi set out to “touch” 100 top people in the organization, with a goal of doing 50
in a year so as to eventually identify the top 20 by 2015. From among them will emerge not just the
leader but a team of ten who would eventually, as group heads, deliver $200 million of turnover each.
That will give a turnover of $2 billion. To put it in perspective, one one VC-funded company, which
has not closed or been bought over, has been able to get to $2 billion and that is Google. But to get
there it has to periodically redefine its mission (why we exist) and its vision – measurable goals for the
next five years. Its redefined mission is built around “successful customers, happy people, and
innovative solution”. Its new vision targets a turnover of $1 billion by 2014. It wants to be among the
globally 20 most profitable IT services companies and also among the 20 globally most admired ones.
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 9
Admired in terms of customer satisfaction (pay for the course), people practices (creditable),
knowledge management (exciting) and corporate governance (the Enron-Satyam effect). The really
interesting bit about Mind Tree in the last one year is what Bagchi has been up to. He has been
embedding himself in the 50 lives, working in a personal private continuum, making it a rich learning
process “which has helped connect so many dots.” Of the hundred who will be engaged, may be 50
will leave, of them 25 may better themselves only marginally, and from the remaining 25 ten will
emerge who will carry the company forward.
Questions:
1. What do you analyse as the main reason behind the success of Mind tree?
2. Do you think that redefining the mission statement shows the lacunae on the part of the founder
members of an organization? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. What are the various methods of collecting statistical data? Explain in brief their merits and
demerits.
2. What do mean by Research design. What are basic types of research design?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-300813


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED
CONTACT:DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com
International Business Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice and Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. What is the series consideration for strategy implementation?
a. Strategic orientation
b. Location
c. Dimensions
d. Both (a) & (b)
2. The major activity in global marketing is:
a. Pricing policies
b. Product lines
c. Market assessment
d. All of the above
3. The third „P‟ in the international marketing mix is:
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
4. The European Economic Community was established in____________
a. 1958
b. 1975
c. 1967
d. 1957
5. Environment Protection Act on______________
a. 1986
b. 1967
c. 1990
d. None of the above
6. People‟s attitude toward time depend on:
a. Language
b. Relationship
c. Culture
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
d. All of the above
7. Culture necessitates adaption of :
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
8. The legal term for brand is:
a. Symbol
b. Name
c. Trade mark
d. All of the above
9. FDI flows are often a reflection of rivalry among firms in____________
a. Global market
b. Indian market
c. International market
d. None of the above
10. ISO certification is:
a. Expensive process
b. Elaborate process
c. Evaluative Process
d. Both (a) & (b)
Part Two:
1. What do understand by „Inward-oriented Policies‟?
2. What is „Factor Endowments Theory‟?
3. Explain the term „Totalitarianism‟.
4. Write about „Persistent Dumping‟.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
THE EU’S LAGGING COMPETITIVENESS
In a report produced for the European Commission, published in November 1998, it was argued that
the EU lags behind the USA and Japan on most measures of international competitiveness. Gross
domestic product per capita, sometimes used as an indicator of international competitiveness at the
country level, was 33 per cent lower in the EU as a whole than in the USA and 13 per cent lower
than in Japan. The EU‟s poor record in creating employment was singled out for particular criticism.
As this appeared to apply across the board in most industrial sectors, it suggested that the EU‟s poor
performance related to the business environment in general and, in particular, to the inflexibility of
Europe‟s labour markets for goods and services. A shortage of risk capital for advanced
technological development and high cost and inefficiency of Europe‟s financial services were also
highlighted by the report. For one reason or another, European industries generally lag behind in
technology industries. If measured by the number of inventions patented in at least two countries, the
USA is well ahead of most European countries, as well as Japan. Despite these shortcomings, the
report‟s authors focus attention on flexible markets, market liberalisation, and the creation of a
competitive business environment rather than on targeted intervention by the EU or national
authorities.
Questions:
1. Is gross domestic product per capita a useful indicator of International competitiveness in the EU?
2. Is it fair to point the blame for the EU‟s poor international competitiveness at inflexible labour
markets, regulated goods and services markets, and a general lack of competition? What
alternative explanations might be suggested?
Caselet 2
PERU
Peru is located on the west coast of South America. It is the third largest nation of the continent (after
Brazil and Argentina), and covers almost 500,000 square miles (about 14 per cent of the size of the
United States). The land has enormous contrasts, with a desert (drier than the Sahara), the towering
snow-capped Andes mountains, sparkling grass-covered plateaus, and thick rain forests. Peru has
approximately 27 million people, of which about 20 per cent live in Lima, the capital. More Indians
(one half of the population) live in Peru than in any other country in the western hemisphere. The
ancestors of Peru‟s Indians were the famous Incas, who built a great empire. The rest of the
population is mixed and a small percentage is white. The economy depends heavily on agriculture,
fishing, mining, and services. GDP is approximately $115 billion and per capita income in recent
years has been around $4,300. In recent years the economy has gained some relative strength and
multinationals are now beginning to consider investing in the country. One of these potential
investors is a large New York based that is considering a $25 million loan to the owner of a Peruvian
fishing fleet. The owner wants to refurbish the fleet and add one more ship. During the 1970s, the
Peruvian government nationalised a number of industries and factories and began running them for
the profit of the state. In most cases, these state-run ventures became disasters. In the late 1970s, the
fishing fleet owner was given back his ships and are getting old and he needs an influx of capital to
make repairs and add new technology. As he explained it to the NEW YORK banker: “fishing is no
longer just un art. There is a great deal of technology involved. And to keep costs low and be
competitive on the world market , you have to have the latest equipment for both locating as well
as catching and then loading and unloading the fish.”Having reviewed the fleet owner‟ operation, the
large multinational bank believes that the loan is justified. The financial institution is concerned ,
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
however , that the Peruvian government might step in during the next couple of years and again
take over the business . If this were to happen, it might take an additional decade, for the loan to be
repaid. If the government were to allow the fleet owner to operate the fleet the way he has over the
last decade, the loan could be rapid within seven years. Right now, the bank is deciding on the
specific terms of the agreement. Once these have been worked out , either a loan officer will fly
down to lima and close the deal or the owner will be asked to come to NEW YORK for the signing.
Whichever approach is used, the bank realize that final adjustments in the agreement will have
to be made on the spot. Therefore, if the bank sends a representative to Lima, the individual will have
to the authority to commit the bank to specific terms. These final matters should be worked out within
the next ten days.
Questions:
1. What are some current issues Facing Peru? What is the climate for doing business in Peru today?
2. Would the bank be better off negotiating the loan in New York or in Lima? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Imagine that you are the director of a major international lending institution supported by funds
from member countries. What one area in newly industrialized and developing economics would
be your priority for receiving development aid? Do you suspect that any member country will be
politically opposed to aid in this area? Why or Why not?
2. The principle problem in analysing different forms of export financing is the distribution of risks
between the exporter and the importer. Analyse the following export financing instruments in this
respect:
(a) Letter of Credit
(b) Cash in advance
(c) Draft
(d) Consignment
(e) Open Account
END OF SECTION C

Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Operating Systems
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The PCD data is allocated using a data Structure is called______________
a. Heap
b. Object Module
c. Tag
d. Head
2. Process is
a. Language of programme
b. Name of a computer software
c. An execution of programme
d. None of the above
3. Streaming tape can store record
a. Without a break irrespective of its size
b. With a break in size of record
c. Of size 10 kb
d. Both (a) & (c)
4. _______________is a policy decision based on the page reference information available in the page table.
a. Memory Allocation
b. Shared Pages
c. Page Replacement
d. Memory Mapping
5. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Multiprocessor computer system provides
a. Slow performance by serving several processes simultaneously
b. High performance by serving several processes simultaneously
c. High performance by serving one process
d. None of the above
7. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
8. A distributed transaction is also called
a. Single-site transaction
b. Two –site transaction
c. Multi-site transaction
d. Both (a) & (b)
9. File control block (FCB) contains all information concerning
a. A file processing activity
b. Execution activity
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
10. Non-uniform memory architecture system consists of number of nodes and each node consists
a. Monitor
b. Register
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. 1 or more C.P.Us
True & False:
1. CPU helps in effective memory management by an OS.
2. High reliability in distributed file systems can be ensured through sharing semantics.
3. The compatible time sharing system for the IBM 7094 was one of the first time sharing systems.
4. The Processors of multiprocessors are divide into processor sets.
5. A resource rank is associated with each resource class.
6. A cached directory is a copy of directory that exists at a primary site.
7. A cluster of nodes is a section of the distributed system that contains sufficient hardware and software resources.
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
8. A cycle is a sufficient condition for a deadlock in MISR system
9. File system integrity implies correctness and consistency of control data and operations of the file system.
10. A mathematical model consists of three components model of the server
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions (Answer should be in 5 Line).
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question is of 5 marks.
1. What do you mean by “Authentication”?
2. Distinguish between File System and IOCS.
3. Define “Segmentation with Paging”.
4. Describe the Deadlock characteristics for different resource system.
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions (Word Limit 100 words)
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any three Questions.
1. Write a Short Note on “Structure of an Operating System”.
2. Define Request-Reply-Acknowledgement Protocol and Explain a Blocking version of RRA Protocol.
3. Explain how starvation is avoided the UNIX and Window system?
4. Discuss influence of disk scheduling algorithms on effectiveness of I/O buffering?
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Describe why authentication is important for file protection?
2. Show actions of the basic and control parts of a process to important Ricart-Agrawala Algorithm?
S-2-301012
END OF SECTION D
END OF SECTION C

Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
System Management
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 1 Mark.
Part One:
Multiple choices
1. TCP stands for
a. Translate Control Protocol
b. Translate Cable Protocol
c. Transmission Control Program
d. Transmission Cable Program
2. Why we do not tap into a 10Base2 or 10BaseT cable in the same way as we tap with 10Base5 cable?
a. Because the cable is so thin.
b. Because the cable is so strong.
c. Because the cable is so thick.
d. Because the cable is so fat.
3. The Ethernet has its roots in an early packet radio network called
a. SMA
b. PARC
c. RWS
d. ALOHA
4. ___________is the second major class of Intra Domain Routing protocol.
a. Reliable Flooding
b. Link State
c. Route Calculation
d. Implementation
5. A Network that provides a constant band width for the complete duration of message transfer is a
a. Cell switched Network
b. Packet switched Network
c. Circuit switched Network
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. A router :-
a. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links upto which the packet originated.
b. Determines on which outgoing link a packet is to be forwarded
c. Forwards a packet to the next free outgoing link
d. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links
7. What is the maximum speed of 10Base5 Ethernet Cable?
a. 100 Mbps
b. 500 Mbps
c. 50 Mbps
d. 10 Mbps
8. What is the maximum number of addressable stations on a 10BaseT Ethernet network?
a. 1024
b. 2500
c. 200
d. 512
9. A device that encodes analog voice into a digital ISDN Link is called
a. DSL
b. GSM
c. CODEC
d. AMPS
10. One of the small difference between the IBM Token Ring specifications and 802.5 is that
a. The former actually requires the use of MSAUs.
b. The former actually requires the use of MAC.
c. The former actually requires the use of TTRT.
d. None of the above
True & False
11. The sliding window protocol is the best known algorithm in computer networking.
12. One of the issues that faces a network designer is how to make this decision in a fair
manner.
13. Multicast addresses area used to send messages to subset of the hosts on an Ethernet.
14. 802.11 can support collision detection.
15. A Network Interface card operates at the Network Layer of the OSI model.
16. TCP port 5432 is the well known server part.
17. CPU is directly responsible for moving data between two networks.
18. Classless inter domain routing is a technique that addresses four scaling concerns in the
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Internet.
19. LAN is a connection oriented packet-switching technology.
20. Ethernet addresses are configured into the network adaptor by the manufacturer.
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions.( Answer should be in 5 lines)
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 5 marks.
1. What are the benefits of Packet Switching?
2. What is an Internetwork?
3. What protocols are there in the TCP/IP internet Layer?
4. What is difference between Virtual circuit Switching and Cell Switching?
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.(word limit 100 words)
 Each Question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any 3 Questions.
1. Write a short note on Classless Inter Domain Routing (CIDR)?
2. What distinguish a computer network from other type of networks?
3. What are the Salient features of Global Internet?
4. Distinguish between Reverse-Path Multicast (RPM) and Protocol Independent Multicast?
END OF SECTION A
END OF SECTION C
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. The Sliding window protocol is perhaps the best known algorithm in computer Network. Describe however is that it can be used to serve different roles.
2. Explain, how the Sliding Window Algorithm works in Direct Link Network?
END OF SECTION D


BUSINESS COMMUNICATION IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
CONTACT:DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com
Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


MANAGING HOTEL OPERATIONS IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER PROVIDED

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Managing Hotel Operations
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Note type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. Housekeeping is the responsibility of:
a. Hotel manager
b. Reservation manager
c. Rooms manager
d. Executive assistant manager
2. Which of the following is not the method of minimizing the overbooking problem:
a. Increasing restrictive policy
b. Third party guaranty
c. Threat of legislation
d. Advance- deposit reservation
3. Which of the following is the channel of the traditional reservation:
a. The changing role of travel agent
b. In-house reservation
c. Central reservation center
d. All of these
4. The real component of “TQM” is?
a. Bedding
b. Cleanliness
c. Noise ,temperature and darkness
d. All of the above
5. Arrange the following into hotel organizational structure:
i. The room manager
ii. The general manager
iii. The hotel manager
iv. Manager of guest services.
Examination Paper of Hotel Management

a. i, ii, iii, iv
b. ii, iv, i, iii
c. ii, iii ,i, iv
d. iv, ii, iii, i
6. Alphabetical list of the day‟s expected arrival, individually and by group is:
a. Cancellation and change report
b. Daily analysis report
c. Arrival report
d. Central reservation report
7. Which is not the component of credit management :
a. Extending credit
b. Credit alert and skippers
c. Minimizing charge backs
d. None of these
8. Reservation contained following information during the procedure are design to improve the
effectiveness of the front office:
a. Arriving and departure dates
b. Number of night
c. Number of person
d. All of the above
9. Bank card is the kind of?
a. Debit card
b. Smart card
c. Credit card
d. None of these
10. Segmentation comes under:
a. New product pattern
b. New market Pattern
c. New product segmentation
d. New management pattern
Part Two:
1. Explain the special characteristics of hotel business?
2. Differentiate between the marketing to the individual and marketing to the group?
3. List the Information contained in reservation.
4. Explain the organizational structure of hotel management?
Examination Paper of Hotel Management

Section B: Caselets (40 Marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 Words)
Caselet 1
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Service industry always has to have a sharp and keen focus on customer‟s requirements, needs and
expectations. With the hotel, hospitality and tourism industry, the expectations are much more. These
are the sectors that have possibly the highest amount of customer interaction within the service sectors
and are most impacted by customer experience from step one.We at Softqube have designed an online,
real time hotel management software, Symphony for the sector keeping in mind their needs and
business requirements. Our aim is to bring to our clients faster, more responsive, agile, robust yet easy
to use and cost effective software that supports all their requirements in real time.
A Hotel Management System like ours, gives the most important information with single click be it the
information about room reservation and availability, conference or even banquet reservation. As a
business you will have a system which helps hotel to manage every bit of information.
It is really important that when you visit the reception, can be provided easily by checking the system
and manage things accordingly.
Our Online hotel management system, Symphony gives our clients a software that is good in
maintaining all the stats of the hotel. The statistics include, but are not limited to revenues, occupancies,
room enquiries, availability. The hotel team and staff can help themselves with these high quality
systems, as folio management helps them to keep all the information about any of their boarders, their
needs, their complaints, and their precision and so on.
Question:
1. What does this mean for the business of our clients?
Caselet 2
The provision of accommodation is a highly competitive market. As tourists look for the best possible
value for money, hotel operators must ensure that they are providing a quality venue with cost
effective services. This program is based on the Mercure Hotel in Hobart and covers the key elements
of its operations (the inputs and processes that create the output). The program examines the ways in
which the design of its facility, the control of materials, the use of technology and the quality standards
all contribute to ensuring the hotel remains productive and competitive.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
1. Name one output of a hotel.
2. Why is the layout of facilities important in a hotel?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 Words)
1. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of hotel technology?
2. Discuss how the room rates impact on guest demand?
3. Explain the traditional hotel industry?
END OF SECTION B
B
END OF SECTION C
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Front Office Operations
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Note type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. To create a professional image and to make guest comfortable about the staff members is a factor
of______
a. Personal presentation
b. An attentive manner
c. Social skills
d. Use of guest‟s names
2 A small booklet which has the guest‟s name, room number and room rate is_______
a. Credit card
b. Key card
c. Bedroom book
d. Room status board
3. Clear is a sign of_______
a. Room left
b. Room occupied
c. Room vacant and ready
d. Room vacant but not ready
4. Which of the following is not a part of „Property Management System‟?
a. General ledger
b. Registration
c. Night audit
d. Computer terminal
5. Arrange the following as procedure for payment by credit card:
i. Ask the client to sign the audit roll (retain the card)
ii. Obtain the card from the client
iii. Check that the signatures on the card and the voucher agree.
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 6
iv. Swipe the card through the machine.
a. i, ii, iii, iv
b. ii, iv, i, iii
c. ii, iii ,i, iv
d. iv, ii, iii, i
6. When the interest and desire is converted into booking or enquiry it is a result of:
a. Interest
b. Attention
c. Action
d. Desire
7. Providing an individual „PIN‟ number to the customer by the hotel authority is a feature of:
a. Voice mail
b. Message waiting facility
c. Fax
d. Access to hotel services
8. Cheques help in controlling frauds in the hotels.
a. Crossing cheques
b. Cheque authorization
c. Foreign cheques
d. Blank cheques
9. Which of the following is not included in the task performed mainly at the reception?
a. Filing
b. Duplicating
c. Word processing
d. Reservation
10. Chart is very time consuming to be up-dated and its errors results in lower
occupancy.
a. Density chart
b. Density reservation chart
c. Stop-go chart
d. Conventional chart
Part Two:
1. Differentiate between the organizational structure of „Small and Medium sized hotels‟.
2. State the main ways in which fire can be prevented in a hotel.
3. List the main methods of „Non-verbal communication‟.
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 7
4. Write a short note on „Inside Availability‟.
Section B: Caselets (40 Marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 Words)
Caselet 1
The Benson Hotel, a mid-sized independent property required new leadership. Mike Schwartz, Vicepresident
of operations, pondered his next move as he reviewed last month‟s financial statements. The
Benson was an eighty-five-room three-star property with a full-service restaurant, lounge, banquet and
health club facilities. The rapidly changing marketplace and new competition from well-established
franchises had made Mike‟s job and the Benson‟s position more tenuous. Mike decided to commission
a consultant‟s report on the property. He called up his longtime friend Jim Burke, who had worked for
major chains across the country and was now a hospitality consultant.
“Jim, how are you old buddy?” Mike asked.
“I am doing very well Mike. This consulting work has run me off my feet. What can I do for you?”
Jim Asked.
“Well Jim, I need an independent review of the Benson. We‟re holding our own but these franchise
guys with their management contracts are really getting aggressive,” Mike said.
“Yes, I know what you mean Mike. I have just completed a marketing study for a new building across
town. These guys have some great programs. You have to try and stay ahead of them,” said Jim.
Mike asked, “Do you think you could visit the property and have some lunch next week? I would like
to start with an employee survey and some site work. You‟ll be working alongside my general
manager, Sean Waters. Sean‟s been with us for about two years. Jim, I have some concerns about this
guy and I‟d like to have a fresh set of eyes look at what‟s going on at the Benson. Okay?”
Jim hesitated, “Okay Mike. How about next Thursday 10:00 a.m.? I‟ll meet you in the lobby.”
“Wonderful, Jim. We‟ll see you then.”
Sean waters had been recruited by Mike as a rising star. Sean‟s background led Mike to believe he
possessed a true spirit for hospitality, especially in the food service area. Sean had worked his way up
in reputable full – service properties and restaurants while completing an undergraduate degree in
hospitability. So, what had gone so wrong at the Benson for Mike to feel he needed to bring in a
consultant to figure it out? Three months later Mike had an interim report on his desk.
Physical Plant Priorities
The following is a review of specific areas of the Benson Hotel that require attention.
Sales Office- Located just off the lobby, this space is open to the public and is well below standards
for this level of property. The property has worked hard to attract the corporate market. A wellrenovated
business center shared with a working sales area would enhance this area gently.
Banquet Servery- Located on the lower level from the main kitchen, this area seems more of a
storage area; in fact this could serve as a limited holding area for banquet service. There is no counter
space and no secure shelving to store dishes, glassware, or cutlery. Floors and walls are in need of
refinishing. Guests have gained access to this area on occasion.
Exterior Garbage Area- The main compactor located in the rear parking lot of the hotel should be
enclosed. It is unsightly to guests and can be viewed from the road by surrounding residences. A
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 8
possible solution would be to pour a concrete slab allowing for drainage and build an enclosure on
three sides to ensure access for pick-up.
Access for persons with disabilities –Presently, the Benson has no access or rooms for guests with
disabilities. At least two units should be converted for this purpose. The main reconfigurations are the
bathrooms and doorways. On a few occasions guests with disabilities were observed leaving the hotel
for other properties in the area that had such facilities. It is a good marketing initiative and may
become necessary to maintain the rating of the property.
Lobby- The lobby chairs and broadloom should be upgraded to reflect the marketplace and reputation
of the property.
Back Office Computer– There is presently no stand- alone back office computer. The computers on
the property are dated and solely devoted to a property management system that is not Windows
based. The following functions could be served with a back office computer.
 Inventory analysis
 Database marketing
 Effective and professional word processing
Parking Lot –The rear parking lot is of particular concern; it does not reflect a three-star property.
Human Resources
The Benson Hotel like many others before it, had over the years placed people in positions of
authority with little or no training to support their efforts. This was true in the following revenue
centers.
Dining Room – During high season the dining room enjoys record covers on many nights. However,
there was one very stressful situation observed. The staffing was mixed with senior staff followed by
poorly trained “warm bodies”. The situation was made worse by the supervisor, Rachel, who was
perceived by the staff as unfair, unapproachable, and often playing favorites with her friends and
family. Rachel, in all fairness, has had no training and was clearly not the person for the job. She
repeatedly showed disrespect for her fellow workers and kitchen staff. Unfairness was clearly
displayed in the allotment of high-gratuity-paying work such as banquets and bus tours. Rachel
played favorites. She would schedule herself and friends to serve high-gratuity events. If you were not
her favorite, you were relegated to breakfast shifts or similar low-gratuity work. An example is the
new girl, Donna, who Rachel hired this summer. Rachel is already giving preferential shifts to Donna
over Isabel, who has been at the Benson for more than five years. Rachel based her decision on
Isabel‟s poor performance, which Rachel said other employees would agree with. This was not the
case when fellow workers were asked. Rachel had also threatened to lay off Isabel in the slow months
instead of Donna or Rachel‟s daughter Lucy. This was clearly an old management style and
unacceptable in any operation. Rachel is also resentful that the kitchen receives 25 percent of group
meal gratuities. In her opinion they do not deserve it. This feeling has permeated among her allies,
instilling an “us against them” animosity between the kitchen and service staff.
Kitchen Operation – The kitchen staff is competent, but leadership is seriously lacking in this area.
James, the interim kitchen supervisor, has difficulty coping with the restricted responsibilities placed
on him and often projects these feelings onto fellow staff. This attitude also has a further negative
effect on Rachel and her staff in the dining area. Chief Wilhelm left three months ago and left little
incentive for James to perform his duties as sous-chef. James is somewhat adrift, constantly
complaining that he is doing a chef‟s job and receiving cook‟s pay.
Management controls and reporting such as inventory are inaccurate at best, with related reports
poorly presented. Production and food handling require improvement from a quality and sanitation
point of view. It seems that many foods taken out for preparation or serving then are left out in a hot
kitchen to deteriorate or go to waste. Scheduling of kitchen employees does not seem to relate to
business peaks and valleys. This has resulted in calling in casual kitchen staff on short notice,
resulting in paid-outs over the counter. One such employee is Gerald, the dishwasher who is Lucy‟s
boyfriend. Rachel on occasion has taken it upon herself to call Gerald in for dishwashing duty when
clearly it is James‟s responsibility to make the call. This situation provides an opportunity for Rachel
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 9
to extend her influence beyond the realm of her authority and has led to increased friction between
Rachel and James.
Employee Audit
This part of Jim‟s report was a detailed employee audit interviewing employees on issues from the
parking lot all the way up to the general manager. It provided Mike with some food for thought. Jim‟s
opening comments was: “if I had to make only one general statement about the relationship between
the employer and employees at this time, I would have to say that it is limping along at a slow, steady
pace. Most of the employees appear satisfied with the type of work they are doing and they speak
well for the company.” Under the section “Lack of Credibility on the part of the General Manager,”
Mike‟s worst fears were confirmed. Jim‟s report continued, “As far as the remainder of the employees
are concerned, they do what they have to and then ignore the general manager. His level of credibility
with these employees is zero. One employee was very philosophical about it when she said “At least
we know what we have to deal with, and we are learning how to deal with him. If they get rid of him
we could get someone worse.” Supporting comments from employees included:
 The general manager is always right.
 The morale of the employees varies with the moods of the general manager
 The general manager intimidates some employees.
 The general manager tries to impress the upper management by pitching in to help when they are
here, but when they are not here he doesn‟t lift a finger.
Jim summed up this section of his report to Mike like this: “This is a case of employees working well
in spite of the general manager rather than because of him. The main problem with this situation is
that a reputable company such as the Benson Hotel cannot support the actions of a general manager
with this type of comportment and still maintain a workable relationship with its employees. My
opinion at this point is that something has to change.”
Questions:
1. Do you feel it was necessary for mike to commission a consultant‟s report on the Benson? Why
or why not? How would you have approached the situation?
2. Identify and propose solutions for the supervisory challenges in the kitchen and dining areas of
the „Benson Hotel‟.
Caselet 2
The Rainbow Golf resort had something to celebrate. The 120- unit golf resort consisting of villas and
condominiums had recently been “re-branded” from a franchise to an independent property. The new
owner, Ken Okura, was reviewing the present organizational structure of the Rainbow along with the
files of key personnel presently running the operation. During the transition period Ken had recruited
his own team including a Vice-President of operations, Director of sales and marketing and Director
of Food and Beverage to restructure the organization; however, he still had a few key areas to fill in.
In the past, each member of the resort‟s management team had staked out his or her own turf with
little internal communication. As a case in point, ken often noticed Shirley, the accountant, regularly
directing the front desk on policies and procedures. All this happened under the watch of Jeremy, the
resort‟s Rooms Division Manager, who didn‟t seem to take notice of such actions. Ken thought that
this overlap of authority surely must confuse the front desk staff.
The transition period had provided Ken with a window of opportunity to evaluate the line and
supervisory staff. Ken had retained Ted Barrow, a human resources consultant; his report‟s findings
were quite a surprise to Ken. Ted‟s report began with the following staff concerns:
 The management does not work together. There is no teamwork, only “flexing” for power. Managers
are out to protect their turf. This attitude pervades the resort.
Examination Paper of Hotel Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 10
 There is no apparent overall direction for the resort. If there is, it is not being communicated
throughout the organization.
 There is no general manager or controller on site. The feeling is that if these people were around,
conflict among the department heads could be avoided.
 There is insufficient training. Employees are thrown into their jobs without being ready to perform
them properly. They should have proper preparation before they have to deal with guests.
 Some departments (front desk in particular) are terribly understaffed. This causes service problems as
well as high staff turnover.
 The staff morale is low. Employees work in separate departments and get caught in a rut. There is no
overall team spirit. It‟s more like “every man for himself.”
 There is little or no awareness of how other departments operate. This knowledge is necessary to help
us understand how we impact each other.
 Many people are currently unhappy. The labor pool is small, and if they leave it will be tough to
replace them. Management should work to keep the staff happy.
 There seems to be a consensus that staff members want to be able to provide good service, but too
many constraints are placed on them to be able to do so.
 It is difficult to know who to go if someone has a problem with his or her manager. There should be
someone designated as the resort manager so that employees have someone to communicate with
should the need to do so arise.
Ken assembled his new team to map out strategies to address the operational challenges and
employee concerns.
Questions:
1. Identify and describe four short-term operational strategies Ken should implement immediately at
the Rainbow Golf Resort.
2. Which form of top-down communication would be most suitable for the Rainbow Golf Resort to
achieve its objectives?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 Words)
1. Explain how the hotel receptionist can contribute to customer satisfaction?
2. Discuss the methods of payments in a hotel.
3. Discuss about the main principles of “Hotel Billing”.
S-2-300813
END OF SECTION B
B
END OF SECTION C


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Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA ONGOING EXAM ANSWER PROVIDED

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CONTACT: DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Human Resource Management
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management

 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words). 
Caselet 1 Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationally-reputed institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000 more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview performance, and wished him good luck. Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr. Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company. After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities. So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on 25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter immediately, but dropped the idea later. Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Caselet 2
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly, changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations: like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment; greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past, Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the flight of talented employees
Question:- 1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions. 
 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 

1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?


FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT MBA IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER PROVIDED

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT MBA IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER PROVIDED
CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Financial Management
Subject Code-B-103 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one: Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees, licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1 Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office of the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor for the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided to “work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This information seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank According to Gupta, the purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they could be collected. He explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash to purchase materials but his customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively new in the business, he did not feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or payment in advance. Instead, he could quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until completion of the job for payment. To show that his operation was sound, he included a list of customers and projects with his loan application. He also included a list of current receivables. Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In addition, he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank. Question: 1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a correct decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based products used in a variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and heavy manufacturing. In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are marketed by a wholly-owned subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters and warehouse facility in San Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume of $85 million in sales annually. About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle credit application and collections on 4,600 accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to $85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net 30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales. Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc., a wholesale supply dealer serving the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth and has grown steadily since that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and had no previous contact with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence International under the same terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent customers. Although Bajaj Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary operated independently and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s cost-accounting department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca Electronics. Bajaj Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that these percentages would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket expenses that were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the contact with Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area. James would
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would be paid whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in collecting any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur variable costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline, warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming that Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup on these sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the discount. If Neck Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the cost of financing the receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit from the account, Gupta was concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers could become bad debts at any time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever their accounts were overdue. His department probably spent three times as much money and effort managing a marginal account as compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and uncollected funds had to be financed by Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow – paying or marginal accounts were very costly to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind, Gupta began to review the credit application for Booth Plastics. Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 
1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive working capital.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


MBA SYSTEM MANAGEMENT IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

MBA SYSTEM MANAGEMENT IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
CONTACT:DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

System Management
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 1 Mark.
Part One:
Multiple choices
1. TCP stands for
a. Translate Control Protocol
b. Translate Cable Protocol
c. Transmission Control Program
d. Transmission Cable Program
2. Why we do not tap into a 10Base2 or 10BaseT cable in the same way as we tap with 10Base5 cable?
a. Because the cable is so thin.
b. Because the cable is so strong.
c. Because the cable is so thick.
d. Because the cable is so fat.
3. The Ethernet has its roots in an early packet radio network called
a. SMA
b. PARC
c. RWS
d. ALOHA
4. ___________is the second major class of Intra Domain Routing protocol.
a. Reliable Flooding
b. Link State
c. Route Calculation
d. Implementation
5. A Network that provides a constant band width for the complete duration of message transfer is a
a. Cell switched Network
b. Packet switched Network
c. Circuit switched Network
d. None of the above
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. A router :-
a. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links upto which the packet originated.
b. Determines on which outgoing link a packet is to be forwarded
c. Forwards a packet to the next free outgoing link
d. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links
7. What is the maximum speed of 10Base5 Ethernet Cable?
a. 100 Mbps
b. 500 Mbps
c. 50 Mbps
d. 10 Mbps
8. What is the maximum number of addressable stations on a 10BaseT Ethernet network?
a. 1024
b. 2500
c. 200
d. 512
9. A device that encodes analog voice into a digital ISDN Link is called
a. DSL
b. GSM
c. CODEC
d. AMPS
10. One of the small difference between the IBM Token Ring specifications and 802.5 is that
a. The former actually requires the use of MSAUs.
b. The former actually requires the use of MAC.
c. The former actually requires the use of TTRT.
d. None of the above
True & False
11. The sliding window protocol is the best known algorithm in computer networking.
12. One of the issues that faces a network designer is how to make this decision in a fair
manner.
13. Multicast addresses area used to send messages to subset of the hosts on an Ethernet.
14. 802.11 can support collision detection.
15. A Network Interface card operates at the Network Layer of the OSI model.
16. TCP port 5432 is the well known server part.
17. CPU is directly responsible for moving data between two networks.
18. Classless inter domain routing is a technique that addresses four scaling concerns in the
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Internet.
19. LAN is a connection oriented packet-switching technology.
20. Ethernet addresses are configured into the network adaptor by the manufacturer.
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions.( Answer should be in 5 lines)
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 5 marks.
1. What are the benefits of Packet Switching?
2. What is an Internetwork?
3. What protocols are there in the TCP/IP internet Layer?
4. What is difference between Virtual circuit Switching and Cell Switching?
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.(word limit 100 words)
 Each Question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any 3 Questions.
1. Write a short note on Classless Inter Domain Routing (CIDR)?
2. What distinguish a computer network from other type of networks?
3. What are the Salient features of Global Internet?
4. Distinguish between Reverse-Path Multicast (RPM) and Protocol Independent Multicast?
END OF SECTION A
END OF SECTION C
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. The Sliding window protocol is perhaps the best known algorithm in computer Network. Describe however is that it can be used to serve different roles.
2. Explain, how the Sliding Window Algorithm works in Direct Link Network?
END OF SECTION D
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Operating Systems
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The PCD data is allocated using a data Structure is called______________
a. Heap
b. Object Module
c. Tag
d. Head
2. Process is
a. Language of programme
b. Name of a computer software
c. An execution of programme
d. None of the above
3. Streaming tape can store record
a. Without a break irrespective of its size
b. With a break in size of record
c. Of size 10 kb
d. Both (a) & (c)
4. _______________is a policy decision based on the page reference information available in the page table.
a. Memory Allocation
b. Shared Pages
c. Page Replacement
d. Memory Mapping
5. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Multiprocessor computer system provides
a. Slow performance by serving several processes simultaneously
b. High performance by serving several processes simultaneously
c. High performance by serving one process
d. None of the above
7. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
8. A distributed transaction is also called
a. Single-site transaction
b. Two –site transaction
c. Multi-site transaction
d. Both (a) & (b)
9. File control block (FCB) contains all information concerning
a. A file processing activity
b. Execution activity
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
10. Non-uniform memory architecture system consists of number of nodes and each node consists
a. Monitor
b. Register
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. 1 or more C.P.Us
True & False:
1. CPU helps in effective memory management by an OS.
2. High reliability in distributed file systems can be ensured through sharing semantics.
3. The compatible time sharing system for the IBM 7094 was one of the first time sharing systems.
4. The Processors of multiprocessors are divide into processor sets.
5. A resource rank is associated with each resource class.
6. A cached directory is a copy of directory that exists at a primary site.
7. A cluster of nodes is a section of the distributed system that contains sufficient hardware and software resources.
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8. A cycle is a sufficient condition for a deadlock in MISR system
9. File system integrity implies correctness and consistency of control data and operations of the file system.
10. A mathematical model consists of three components model of the server
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions (Answer should be in 5 Line).
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question is of 5 marks.
1. What do you mean by “Authentication”?
2. Distinguish between File System and IOCS.
3. Define “Segmentation with Paging”.
4. Describe the Deadlock characteristics for different resource system.
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions (Word Limit 100 words)
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any three Questions.
1. Write a Short Note on “Structure of an Operating System”.
2. Define Request-Reply-Acknowledgement Protocol and Explain a Blocking version of RRA Protocol.
3. Explain how starvation is avoided the UNIX and Window system?
4. Discuss influence of disk scheduling algorithms on effectiveness of I/O buffering?

Information Technology
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Note type questions 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. It means data that have been processed in a form that is meaningful and useful to the user.
a. Data
b. Information
c. System
d. None of the above
2. BCR stands for____________
a. Bar code reader
b. Basic code reader
c. Business code reader
d. None of the above
3. Which of the following comes under output devices?
a. Printer
b. Speaker
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None
4. A trackball is a stationary device related to the_______
a. Keyboard
b. Joystick
c. Mouse
d. All of the above
5. ___________is a volatile memory and everything disappears if power goes off or is turned off abruptly in the middle of work.
a. RAM
b. ROM
c. CDROM
d. None of the above
6. IC stands for____________
a. Integrated Circuit
b. Information Circuit
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Examination Paper of Information Technology
c. Interrelated Circuit
d. None of the above
7. DSS stands for____________
a. Decision Support System
b. Direction Support System
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
8. How many characters uses the MICR system?
a. 15 characters
b. 18 characters
c. 24 characters
d. 14 characters
9. One Megabyte contains:
a. 1000 KB
b. 1000 Bytes
c. 1000 MB
d. None of the above
10. The smallest element of data is called_______
a. Byte
b. Bit
c. Giga byte
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Write a note on „Cache Memory‟.
2. List the different types of information systems.
3. Write a short note on „Value Chain Analysis‟
4. Discuss peer- to – peer model in distributed computing system.
END OF SECTIONA
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each caselet carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 
Caselet 1
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
It began as a trading site for nerds, the newly jobless, home-bound housewives, and bored retirees to sell subprime goods: collectibles and attic trash. But eBay (www.ebay.com) quickly grew into a teeming marketplace of 30 million, with its own laws and norms, such as a feedback system in which buyers and sellers rate each other on each transaction. When that wasn‟t quite enough, eBay formed its own police force to patrol the listings for fraud and kick out offenders. The company even has something akin to a bank: Its Paypal payment-processing unit allows buyers to make electronic payments to eBay sellers who can‟t afford a merchant credit card account. “eBay is creating a second, virtual economy,” says W. Brian Arthur, an economist at think tank Santa Fe Institute. “It‟s opening up a whole new medium of exchange.” eBay‟s powerful vortex is drawing diverse products and players into its profitable economy, driving its sellers into the heart of traditional retailing, a $2 trillion market. Among eBay‟s 12 million daily listings are products from giants such as Sears Roebuck, Home Depot, Walt Disney, and even IBM. More than a quarter of the offerings are listed at fixed prices. The result, says Bernard H. Tenenbaum, president of a retail buyout firm, is
“They„re coming right for the mainstream of the retail business.” So what started out as a pure consumer auction market-place is now also becoming a big time business-to-consumer and even business-to-business bazaar that is earning record profits for eBay‟s stockholders. And as the eBay economy expands, CEO Meg Whitman and her team may find that managing it could get a lot tougher, especially because eBay‟s millions of passionate and clamorous users demand a voice in all major decisions. This process is clear in one of eBay‟s most cherished institutions: the voice of the Customer program. Every couple of months, the executives of eBay bring in as many as a dozen sellers and buyers, especially its high selling “Power Sellers,” to ask them questions about how they work and what else eBay needs to do. And at least twice a week, it holds hour-long teleconferences to poll users on almost every new feature or policy, no matter how small. The result is that users feel like owners, and they take the initiative to expand the eBay economy – often beyond management‟s wildest dreams. Stung by an aerospace down-turn, for instance, machine-tool shop Reliable Tools Inc., tried listing a few items on eBay in late 1998. Some were huge, hulking chunks of metal, such as a $7,000 2,300-pound milling machine. Yet they sold like ice cream in August.
Since then, says Reliable‟s auction manager, Richard Smith, the company‟s eBay business has “turned into a monster.” Now the Irwindale (California) shop‟s $1 million in monthly eBay sales constitutes 75% of its overall business. Pioneers such as Reliable promoted eBay to set up an industrial products marketplace in January that‟s on track to top $500 million in gross sales this year.Then there is eBay Motors. When eBay manager Simon Rothman first recognized a market for cars on cars on eBay in early 1999, he quickly realized that such high-ticket items would require a different strategy than simply opening a new category. To jump-start its supply of cars and customers, eBay immediately bought a collector-car auction company, Kruse International, for $150 million in stock, and later did a deal to include listings from online classifieds site, AutoTrader.com. Rothman also arranged insurance and warranty plans, an escrow service, and shipping and inspection services.This approach worked wonder. Sales of cars and car parts, at a $5 billion-plus annual clip, are eBay’s single largest market. That has catapulted eBay in front of No. 1 U.S. auto dealer AutoNation in number of used cars sold. About half of the sellers are brick-and-mortar dealers who now have a much larger audience than their local area. “eBay is by far one of my better sources for buyers,” says Bradley Bonifacius, Internet sales director at Dean Stallings Ford in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. And for now, the big corporations, which still account for under 5 percent of eBay‟s gross sales, seem to be bringing in more customers then they steal. Motorola Inc., for example, helped kick off a new wholesale business for eBay last year, selling excess and returned cell phones in large lots. Thanks to the initiative of established companies such as Motorola, eBay‟s wholesale business jumped ninefold, to $23 million, in the first quarter.As businesses on eBay grow larger, they spur the creation of even more businesses. A new army of merchants, for example, is making a business out of selling on eBay for other people. From almost none a couple of years ago, these so called Trading Assistants now number nearly 23,000. This kind of organic growth makes it
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Examination Paper of Information Technology
exceedingly though to predict how far the eBay economy can go. Whitman professes not to know.
“We don‟t actually control this,” she admits. “We are not building this company by ourselves. We have a unique partner – million of people.”
Questions:
1. Why has eBay become such a successful and diverse online marketplace? Visit the eBay website to help you answer, and check out their many trading categories, specialty sites, international sites, and other features.
2. Why do you think eBay has become the largest online/offline seller of used cars, and the largest online seller of certain other products, like computers and photographic equipment?
Caselet 2
It‟s no secret that somewhere in a back room in the typical Fortune 500 company, there‟s a team of analytical wizards running sophisticated data mining queries that mine for gems such as data about about the company‟s best customers – those top 20 percent of clients that produce 80 percent of the company‟s profits. These jewels can be a business‟s most valuable intellectual property, which makes them very valuable to competitors. What‟s to prevent that data set from walking out the door or falling into the wrong hands? Sometimes, not much. Many companies lack the internal controls to prevent that information from leaking. The problem is that such data is as hard to protect as it is to find. Owens & Minor Inc. (www.ownes-minor.com), a $4 billion medical supplies distributor, counts some of the nation‟s largest health care organizations among its customers. In late 1996, it started mining data internally using business intelligence software from Business Objects SA. “From the beginning, we were aware of security issues around this strategic information about our operations,” says Don Stoller, senior director of information systems at Owens & Minor. “For example, a sales executive in Dallas should only have access to analyses from his region.” It is always possible that someone who has legitimate access will abuse that trust, but companies can minimize that potential by strictly limiting access to only those who need it. thus, Owens & Minor uses role-level security functions that clearly define who has access to which data. “This meant we had to build a separate security table in our Oracle database,” says Stoller. A few years later, when the company wanted to open its systems to suppliers and customers, security became even more important. In 1998, Owens & Minor moved quickly to take advantage of Web-intelligence software from Business Objects that‟s designed to Web-enable business intelligence systems. The result was Wisdom, an extranet Web portal that lets Owens & Minor‟s suppliers and customers access their own transactional data and generate sophisticated analyses and reports from it.“It business-to-business transactions, security is key,” says Stoller. “We had to make absolutely sure that Jhonson & Jhonson, for example, could not see any 3M‟s information. This meant we had to set up specific customer and supplier security tables, and we had to maintain new, secured database views using the Oracle DBMS and Business Objects.”Wisdom was such a success that Owens & Minor decided to go into the intelligence business with the launch of wisdom2 in the spring of 2000. “We capture data out of a hospital‟s materials management system and load it into our data warehouse,” Stoller explains. A hospital can then make full use of its business-intelligence software to mine and analyze purchasing data. Owens & Minor receives a licensing and maintenance fee for the services.Layers of security and encryption require a considerable amount of overhead data for systems administration.
Both Stoller and Michael Rasmussen, an analyst at Giga Information Group, say that‟s the main reason security concerns about business intelligence are often swept under the carpet. The issues of authentication (identifying the user) and authorization (what things the user is allowed to do) must be addressed, usually across different applications, Rasmussen says, adding, “Systems
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Examination Paper of Information Technology
administration can be a real nightmare.”“We are going through some of this,” says David Merager, director of Web services and corporate applications at Vivendi Universal Games Inc.
(www.vugames.com). “Our business intelligence needs more security attention.” Business intelligence reports come from two systems: an Oracle-based for budgets on a Microsoft SQL Server database. The heart of the business intelligence system consists of Microsoft‟s OLAP application and software from Comshare Inc. that provides the Web-based front end for the analytics. “Our budget teams use these reports to do real-time analyses,” says Merager. Rodger Sayles, manager of data warehousing at Vivendi Universal, says one way to secure such a system is to assign roles to all users within the Microsoft application. Roles determine precisely what a user is allowed to see and do and are usually managed within a directory. If your computing architecture is amenable to a single, centralized directory that supports roles, this may be an attractive solution. “The problem is that once you have over 40 distinct roles, you run into performance issues, and we have identified about 70 user roles,” Sayles explains. He says there‟s way around this difficulty. “I think we are going to use a combination of Web portals and user roles. A user would sign on through a particular Web portal, which would effectively place the user in a role category. This reduces the overhead burden on the application,” says Sayles.
Questions:
1. Why have developments in IT helped to increase the value of the data resources of many companies?
2. How can companies use IT to meet the challenges of data resources security?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
1. Explain distributed systems. What are the advantages and disadvantages of distributed systems?
2. What do you mean by database? List the different types of database model.
END OF SECTIONC
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Examination Paper of Information Technology
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper
MM.100
Database Management Systems
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short answer type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 2 marks each & Part Two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. A collection of related sets of data items along with necessary data/ information associated with it.
a. Data
b. Information
c. Process
d. Database
2. ___________connects computers which are very remotely placed.
a. Local Area Network
b. Wide Area Network
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None
3. A column in a table is called__________
a. Field
b. Record
c. Tuple
d. Link
4. DDL stands for ___________
a. Data Definition Language
b. Data Decision Language
c. Database Definition Language
d. None
5. SQL stands for ___________
a. Structured Query Language
b. Statement Query Language
c. Strict Query language
d. None
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Part Two:
1. List the different types of DBMS.
2. Differentiate between „DBMS‟ and „RDBMS‟.
3. What do you mean by „Data Dictionary‟?
4. Differentiate between discretionary access control and mandatory access control.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 
Caselet 1
Database management system is the complex software which is aimed at the management of the information stored in the database effectively. A high-quality management system helps organize, manipulate, transform, store, retrieve and create data professionally. It is important that the whole information kept in the database could be accessible, manageable, and easy for manipulation. A successful DBMS should possess a strict logical structure, which enables everyone to find the required data easily. The high-quality management system gives the opportunity for the user to change the required information without any harm to the whole application. Database management systems are extremely important today, because the humanity lives in the age of information and the whole information is kept in databases which require professional skilful management and flexibility.
Every organization, private and public, connected with business or not possesses the necessary information which is essential for its proper functioning. The information is supposed to be stored in security and only the employees of an organization can have access to it. The idea of a good database management system is to make the work of an organization easier, faster and of higher quality, because the easier and the faster the access to the data is, the faster the work will be. Moreover, if the information becomes out-of-date, the experts can modify it and introduce the necessary changes to make it valid.
1. What are the roles of a database in present scenario?
Caselet 2
The most dramatic advance of the past decade in software technology has been the development of database management systems (DBMS). There is little question about the potential of these systems for enhancing system support to managers and users while reducing design, structuring, and
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maintenance problems. Database systems also provide a way of improving information system flexibility by decoupling user-oriented data structures from physical storage methods. In spite of the vast potential of database management systems, the information systems community has not reacted with the total enthusiasm that might have been expected. Significant resistance has been encountered in some organizations, both from users, systems managers, and programming staff members. Although the literature on the features of database systems is substantial, there is little discussion of resistance problems encountered during the actual implementation and use of these systems in organizations. The purpose of this panel is to examine issues related to resistance toward DBMS in organizations. The panel members, each of whom is experienced in this area, will examine a number of organizational, technical, and application issues pertinent to the problem of resistance. The discussion will focus on why this resistance has occurred and how, if at all possible, it could have been avoided. Both behavioral and technical issues will be examined. This session should be of interest to both the practitioner and theorist alike. Database management systems are collectively the most significant software product advance in the last decade. There is little question about the potential of these systems for improving data management in organizations. Yet not all persons show a level of enthusiasm for these systems that their capabilities would merit. Users and systems persons alike have been known to resist acquisition and/or introduction of database management systems, sometimes strongly. In the discussion that follows, the problem of resistance as it applies to database management systems is introduced. The intent is to raise issues for research and investigation rather than to provide concrete answers to problems.
1. Discuss various anomalies in databases. How would you improve data management in organizations?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 


1. What do you understand by relational data model? Explain relational constraints and relational database schemas
2. What are the similarities and dissimilarities in the software development life cycle and database development life cycle?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-300813
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IIBM MBA EXAM MAY 2018 QUESTION AND ANSWER PROVIDED

IIBM MBA EXAM MAY 2018 QUESTION AND ANSWER PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
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Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
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6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.

Financial Management
Subject Code-B-103
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the
stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees,
licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment
proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the
management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the
constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of
the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through
diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case
On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office of
the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan
department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in
person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had
considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor for
the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided to
“work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This information
seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank According to Gupta, the
purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they could be collected. He
explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash to purchase materials but his
customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively new in the business, he did not
feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or payment in advance. Instead, he could
quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until completion of the job for payment. To show that
his operation was sound, he included a list of customers and projects with his loan application. He also
included a list of current receivables.
Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had
financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In addition,
he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank.
Question:
1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company
Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a correct
decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based products used in a
variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and heavy manufacturing.
In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are marketed by a wholly-owned
subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters and warehouse facility in San
Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume of $85 million in sales annually.
About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at
Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle credit application and collections on 4,600
accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to $85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net
30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt
losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales. Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc.,
a wholesale supply dealer serving the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth
and has grown steadily since that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and
had no previous contact with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence.
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
International under the same terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent
customers. Although Bajaj Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary
operated independently and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s
cost-accounting department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca
Electronics. Bajaj Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that
these percentages would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket
expenses that were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the
contact with Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area.
James would receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would
be paid whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in
collecting any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur
variable costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline,
warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead
approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential
profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming that
Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup on these
sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the discount. If Neck
Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the cost of financing the
receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit from the account, Gupta was
concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers could become bad debts at any
time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever their accounts were overdue. His
department probably spent three times as much money and effort managing a marginal account as
compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and uncollected funds had to be financed by
Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow – paying or marginal accounts were very costly
to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind, Gupta began to review the credit application for
Booth Plastics.
Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth
Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of
credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while
determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive
working capital.
END OF SECTION C
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Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.
Part One Multiple Choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes& behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as: a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
d. Brand image
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6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Define Marketing Mix.
2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.
3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.
4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
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 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
Caselet 1 Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail. Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally, common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in 1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models. Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase, walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of
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Indian shoppers still prefer to pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over. Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families, kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The in-house wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations, though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point). Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With 60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor) in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique manner) are being aired. The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text – or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital. Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
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Caselet 2 The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children. Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in 70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eye-popping 64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adult-oriented material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of 1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999 with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals, and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web, and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2 finitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an all-round entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment. However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube would not run
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on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product, as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2, Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available. Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube. Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have high-speed access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional $39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299. Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001 the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season, 6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to $199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent. The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in 2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
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slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts). Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just 4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”. Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as email?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 

1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product life cycle concept.
2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.
END OF SECTION C
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Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper
Production and Operations Management MM.100
Subject Code-B107 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Production and Operations Management concerns itself with the conversion of:
a. Outputs in to inputs
b. Inputs in to outputs
c. Outputs in to outputs
d. None of the above
2. Continuous Production is
a. The last operation to the finished product
b. The first operation to the finished product
c. The mid operation to the finished product
d. None of the above
3. Independent demand is
a. Demand that is controlled by the company
b. Demand that is controlled by the customer
c. Demand that is not controlled by the company
d. All of the above
4. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has been defined as a
a. Complete Enterprise wide business solution
b. Complete Enterprise narrow business solution
c. a & b
d. None of the above
5. CAD stands for
a. Computer Architecture Design
b. Computer Aided Design
c. Computer Aided Drafting
d. All of the above
6. Delphi method is the most widely used and accurate method of
a. Demand forecasts
b. Exponential forecasts
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c. Technological forecasts
d. All of the above
7. JIT/Kanban systems help eliminate __________
a. Increase the number of products
b. Increase the amount of raw materials
c. Increase the amount of energy
d. All of the above
8. PPSCS stands for
a. Project Planning Scheduling & Control System
b. Project Planning Sequencing & Control System
c. Production Planning Scheduling & Control System
d. None of the above
9. Process layout is also known as.
a. Group layout
b. Line layout
c. Product layout
d. Functional layout
10. Time study is a ______ technique for recording the times and rate of working
a. Standard times
b. Work measurement
c. Allowances
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define Job Shop Production.
2. What do you understand by „Quality Control‟?
3. What do you mean by materiel handling?
4. Define ABC analysis.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1
Company Background
The Bronson Insurance Group was originally founded in 1900 in Auxvasse, Missouri, by James Bronson.
The Bronson Group owns a variety of companies that underwrite personal and commercial insurance
policies. Annual sales of the Bronson Group are $100 million. In recent years, the company has suffered
operating losses. In 1990, the company was heavily invested in computer hardware and software. One of
the problems the Bronson Group faced (as well as many insurance companies) was a conflict between
established manual procedures and the relatively recent (within the past 20 years) introduction of
computer equipment. This conflict was illustrated by the fact that much information was captured on
computer but paper files were still kept for practical and legal reasons.
File Clerks
The file department employed 20 file clerks who pulled files from stacks, refilled used files, and delivered
files to various departments including commercial lines, personal lines, and claims. Once a file clerk
received the file. Clerks delivered files to underwriters on an hourly basis throughout the day. The average
file clerk was paid $8,300 per year. One special file clerk was used full time to search for requested files
that another file clerk had not been able to find in the expected place. It was estimated that 40 percent of
the requested files were these “no hit” files requiring a search. Often these “no hit” files were eventually
found stacked in the requester‟s office. The primary “customers” of the file clerks were underwriters and
claims attorneys.
Underwriting
Company management and operations analysts were consistently told that the greatest problem in the
company was the inability of file clerks to supply files in a speedy fashion. The entire company from top to
bottom viewed the productivity and effectiveness of the department as unacceptable. An underwriter used
20-50 files per day. Because of their distrust of the files department, underwriters tended to hoard often
used files. A count by operations analysts found that each underwriter kept from 100-200 files in his or her
office at any one time. An underwriter would request a file by computer and work on other business until
the file was received. Benson employed 25 underwriters.
Management Information System
Upper management was deeply concerned about this problem. The MIS department had suggested using
video disks as a possible solution. A video disk system was found that would be sufficient for the
companies needs at a cost of about $12 million. It was estimated that the system would take two years to
install and make compatible with existing information systems. Another, less attractive was using
microfilm. A microfilm system would require underwriters to go to a single keyboard to request paper
copies of files. The cost of a microfilm system was $5 million.
Questions:
1. What do you recommend? Should the company implement one of the new technologies, if yes,
why?
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2. An operations analyst suggested that company employees shared a “dump on the clerks”
mentality. Explain.
Caselet 2
Harrison T. Wenk III is 43, married, and has two children, ages 10 and 14. He has a master‟s degree
in education and teachers junior high school music in a small town in Ohio. Harrison‟s father passed
away two months ago, leaving his only child an unusual business opportunity. According to his
father‟s will, Harrison has 12 months to become active in the family food-catering business, Kare-
Full Katering, Inc., or it will be sold to two key employees for a reasonable and fair price. If Harrison
becomes involved, the two employees have the option to purchase a significant, but less than
majority, interest in the firm. Harrison‟s only involvement with this business, which his grandfather
established, was as an hourly employee during high school and college summers. He is confident that
he could learn and perhaps enjoy the marketing side of the business, and that he could retain the longtime
head of accounting/finance. But he would never really enjoy day-to-day operations. In fact, he
doesn‟t understand what operations management really involves. In 1991 Kare-Full Katering, Inc. had
$3.75 million in sales in central Ohio. Net profit after taxes was $ 105,000, the eleventh consecutive
year of profitable operations and the seventeenth in the last 20 years. There are 210 employees in this
labor-intense business. Institutional contracts account for over 70 percent of sales and include partial
food services for three colleges, six commercial establishments) primarily manufacturing plants and
banks), two long -term care facilities, and five grade schools. Some customer location employs a
permanent operations manager; others are served from the main kitchens of Kare-Full Katering.
Harrison believes that if he becomes active in the business, one of the two key employees, the vice
president of operations, will leave the firm. Harrison has decided to complete the final two months of
this school year and then spend the summer around Kare-Full Katering – as well as institutions with
their own food services – to assess whether he wants to become involved in the business. He is
particularly interested in finding out as much as possible about operations. Harrison believes he owes
it to his wife and children to fairly evaluate this opportunity.
Questions:
1. Prepare a worksheet of operations activities that Harrison should inquire about this summer.
2. If you were Harrison, what would you do? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This Section Consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What do you mean by Tactical Planning? What are the mathematical approaches to aggregate
planning?
2. What is the concept of forecasting in operation? List the different types of forecasting methods.


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Strategic Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. A plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal is:
a. Tactic
b. Strategy
c. Financial benefits
d. None of the above
2. It is important to develop mission statement for:
a. Allocating organizational resources
b. Provide useful criteria
c. Company creed
d. Customer orientation
3. The five forces model was developed by :
a. Airbus
b. Karin Larsson
c. Michael E.Porter
d. Boeing
4. How many elements are involve in developing in an organizational strategy:
a. Six
b. Two
c. Four
d. Nine
5. The three important steps in SWOT analysis are:
a. Identification, Conclusion, Translation
b. Opportunities, Threats, Strengths
c. People, Corporate cultures, Labour
d. Power, Role, Task
6. GE matrix consists of how many cells?
a. Nine cells
b. Six cells
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Eight cells
d. Three cells
7. Which of these is the type of Games:
a. Simultaneous Games
b. Sequential Games
c. Repeated Games
d. All of the above
8. SBU stands fora.
Simple Basic Unit
b. Strategic Basic Unit
c. Strategic Business Unit
d. Speed Business Unit
9. The BCG matrix is known as:
a. Growth share matrix
b. Directional policy matrix
c. GE nine-cell matrix
d. Space matrix
10. ______________ specifies sales revenues and selling distribution and marketing costs.
a. Financial budget
b. Sales budget
c. Operating budget
d. Expenses budget
Part Two:
Q. 1 What are the dimensions of Strategic management?
Q. 2 Critically analyze the concept of BCG Matrix.
Q. 3 What is SWOT analysis?
Q. 4 What are the characteristics of Short-term Objectives?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
National Competitive Advantage of IKEA Group, a Swedish company founded in 1943 with its
headquarters in Denmark, is a multinational operator of a chain of stores for home furnishing and
furniture. It is the world‟s largest retailer, which specializes, in stylish but inexpensive Scandinavian
designed furniture. At the end of 2005 the IKEA Group of Companies had a total of 175 stores in 31
countries. In addition there are 19 IKEA stores owned and run by franchisees, outside the IKEA store
around the world.
In Sweden, nature and a home both play a big part in people‟s life. In fact one of the best ways to describe
the Swedish home furnishing style is to describe nature-full of light and fresh air, yet restrained and
unpretentious.
To match up the artist Carl and Karin Larsson combined classical influences with warmer Swedish folk
styles .They created a model of Swedish home furnishing design that today enjoys world-wide renown. In
the 1950s the styles of modernism and functionalism developed at the same time as Sweden established a
society founded on social equality .The IKEA product range –The IKEA product range- modern but not
trendy, functional yet attractive, human-centered and child friendly – carries on these various Swedish
home furnishing traditions.
The IKEA Concept, like lots founder, was born in Samaland. This is a part of Southern Sweden where the
soil is thin and poor. The people are famous for working hard, living on small means and using their
heads to make the best possible use of the limited resources they have. This way of doing things is at the
heart of the IKEA approach to keeping prices low.
IKEA was founded when Sweden was fast becoming an example of the caring society, where rich and
poor alike were well looked after. This is also a theme that fits well with the IKEA vision. In order to give
the many people a better everyday life, IKEA asks the customer to work as a partner. The product range is
child-friendly and covers the need of the whole family, young and old. So together we can a better
everyday life for everyone.
In addition to working about around 1,800 different suppliers across the world, IKEA produces many of
its own products through sawmills and factories in the IKEA industrial group, Swedwood.
Swedwood also has a duty to transfer knowledge to other suppliers, for example by educating them in
issues such as efficiency, quality and environmental work.
Swedwood has 35 industrial units in 11 countries.
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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Purchasing: IKEA has 42 Trading Service Offices (TSO‟s) in 33 countries. Proximity to their suppliers
is the key to rational, long term cooperation. That‟s why TSO co-workers visit suppliers regularly to
monitor production, test new ideas, negotiate prices and carry out quality audits and inspection.
Distribution: The route from supplier to customer must be as direct, cost- effective and environmentally
friendly as possible. Flat packs are important aspects of this work: eliminating wasted space means we
can transport and store goods more efficiently. Since efficient distribution plays a key role in the work of
creating the low price, goods routing and logistics are a focus for constant development.
The business Idea: The IKEA business idea is to offer a wide range of home furnishings with good design
and function at prices so low that as many people as possible will be able to afford them. And still have
many left! The company targets the customer who is looking for value and is willing to do a little bit of
work serving themselves, transporting the items home and assembling the furniture for a better price. The
typical IKEA customer is young low to middle income family.
The Competition Advantage: The competition advantage strategy of IKEA‟s product is reflected through
IKEA‟s success in the real industry. It can be attributed to its vast experience in the retail market, product
differentiation, and cost leadership.
IKEA Product Differentiation: A wide product range The IKEA product range is wide and versatile in
several ways. First, it‟s versatile in function. Because IKEA think customer, shouldn‟t have to run from
one small specialty shop to another to furnish their home, IKEA gather plants, living room furnishings,
toys , frying pans, whole kitchens i.e.; everything which in a functional way helps to build a home – in
one place , at IKEA stores.
Second, it‟s wide in style. The romantic at heart will find choices just as many as the minimalist at IKEA.
But There is only one thing IKEA don‟t have, and that is, the far- out or the over-decorated. They only
have what helps build a home that has room for good living.
Third, by being coordinated, the range is wide in function and style at the same time. No matter which
style you prefer, there‟s an armchair that goes with the bookcase that goes with the new extending table
that goes with the armchair. So their range is wide in a variety of ways.
Cost Leadership: A wide range with good form and function is only half the story. Affordability has a part
to play – the largest part. A wide range with good form and function is only half the story. Affordability
has a part to play- the largest part. And the joy of being able to own it without having to forsake
everything else. And the customers help, too, by choosing the furniture, getting it at the warehouse,
transporting it home and assembling it themselves , to keep the price low.
Questions
1. Do you think that IKEA has been successful to utilize Porter‟s Five force analysis? Give
reasons.
2. Where do you think can IKEA improve?
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
For ITC Ltd., 2007-2008 continued to be year of quiet growth. Just more launches in its relatively new
segment of non-cigarettes fast moving consumer goods, and solid growth. As in the past few years, ITC‟s
non-cigarettes businesses continued to grow at a scorching pace, accounting for a bigger share of overall
revenues. “The non-cigarette portfolio grew by 37.6% during 2006-2007 and accounted during that year
for 52.3% of the company‟s net turnover.” An ITC spokesman said. In fact, over the first three quarters of
2007-08, ITC‟s non-cigarette FMCG businesses have grown by 48% on the same period last year,
“Indicating that its plans for increasing market share and standing are succeeding.”
The branded packaged foods business continued to expand rapidly, with the focus on snacks range Bingo.
The biscuit category continued its growth momentum with the „Sun feast‟ range of biscuits launching
„Coconut‟ and „Nice‟ variants and the addition of „ Sunfeast BenneVita Flaxseed‟ biscuits. Aashirwad atta
and kitchen ingredients retained their top slots at the national level, with the spices category adding an
organic range. In the confectionery category which grew by 38% in the third quarter, ITC cited AC
Nielsen data it claims market leader status in throat lozenges. Instant mixes and pasta powdered the sales
of its ready to eat foods under the kitchens of India and Aashirwad brands.
In Lifestyle apparel, ITC launched Miss Players fashion wear for young women to compliment its range
for men.
Overall, the biscuit category grew by 58% during the last quarter, ready to eat foods under the kitchens of
India and Aashirwad brands by 63% and the lifestyle business by 26%.
For the Industry, the most significant initiative to watch the ITC foray into premium personal care
products with its Fiama Di Wills range of shampoos , conditioners, shower gels, and soaps. In the popular
segment, ITC has launched a range of soaps and shampoos under the brand name Superia.
Ravi Naware, Chief executive of ITC‟s food business was quoted recently as saying that the business will
make a positive contribution to ITC‟s bottom line in the next two to three years.
In hotels, ITC‟s Fortune Park brand was making the news during the year, with a rapid rollout of first
class business hotels.
In the agri-business segment, the e-choupal network is trying out a pilot in retailing fresh fruits and
vegetables. The e-choupals have already specialized in feeding ITC high quality wheat and potato, among
other commodities grown by farmers with help from e-choupal.
Questions:
Q1. Do you think the progress of ITC Ltd. is realistic?
Q2. After analyzing the above case, do you think every company should aim at cost leadership with high
quality product?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Q.1. What are the basic principles of Organizational structure? What are the different types of
Organizational structures?
Q.2. What do you understand by SBU? Explain various models of business level strategies

Production and Operations Management MM.100
Subject Code-B107 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Production and Operations Management concerns itself with the conversion of:
a. Outputs in to inputs
b. Inputs in to outputs
c. Outputs in to outputs
d. None of the above
2. Continuous Production is
a. The last operation to the finished product
b. The first operation to the finished product
c. The mid operation to the finished product
d. None of the above
3. Independent demand is
a. Demand that is controlled by the company
b. Demand that is controlled by the customer
c. Demand that is not controlled by the company
d. All of the above
4. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has been defined as a
a. Complete Enterprise wide business solution
b. Complete Enterprise narrow business solution
c. a & b
d. None of the above
5. CAD stands for
a. Computer Architecture Design
b. Computer Aided Design
c. Computer Aided Drafting
d. All of the above
6. Delphi method is the most widely used and accurate method of
a. Demand forecasts
b. Exponential forecasts
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Technological forecasts
d. All of the above
7. JIT/Kanban systems help eliminate __________
a. Increase the number of products
b. Increase the amount of raw materials
c. Increase the amount of energy
d. All of the above
8. PPSCS stands for
a. Project Planning Scheduling & Control System
b. Project Planning Sequencing & Control System
c. Production Planning Scheduling & Control System
d. None of the above
9. Process layout is also known as.
a. Group layout
b. Line layout
c. Product layout
d. Functional layout
10. Time study is a ______ technique for recording the times and rate of working
a. Standard times
b. Work measurement
c. Allowances
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define Job Shop Production.
2. What do you understand by „Quality Control‟?
3. What do you mean by materiel handling?
4. Define ABC analysis.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1
Company Background
The Bronson Insurance Group was originally founded in 1900 in Auxvasse, Missouri, by James Bronson.
The Bronson Group owns a variety of companies that underwrite personal and commercial insurance
policies. Annual sales of the Bronson Group are $100 million. In recent years, the company has suffered
operating losses. In 1990, the company was heavily invested in computer hardware and software. One of
the problems the Bronson Group faced (as well as many insurance companies) was a conflict between
established manual procedures and the relatively recent (within the past 20 years) introduction of
computer equipment. This conflict was illustrated by the fact that much information was captured on
computer but paper files were still kept for practical and legal reasons.
File Clerks
The file department employed 20 file clerks who pulled files from stacks, refilled used files, and delivered
files to various departments including commercial lines, personal lines, and claims. Once a file clerk
received the file. Clerks delivered files to underwriters on an hourly basis throughout the day. The average
file clerk was paid $8,300 per year. One special file clerk was used full time to search for requested files
that another file clerk had not been able to find in the expected place. It was estimated that 40 percent of
the requested files were these “no hit” files requiring a search. Often these “no hit” files were eventually
found stacked in the requester‟s office. The primary “customers” of the file clerks were underwriters and
claims attorneys.
Underwriting
Company management and operations analysts were consistently told that the greatest problem in the
company was the inability of file clerks to supply files in a speedy fashion. The entire company from top to
bottom viewed the productivity and effectiveness of the department as unacceptable. An underwriter used
20-50 files per day. Because of their distrust of the files department, underwriters tended to hoard often
used files. A count by operations analysts found that each underwriter kept from 100-200 files in his or her
office at any one time. An underwriter would request a file by computer and work on other business until
the file was received. Benson employed 25 underwriters.
Management Information System
Upper management was deeply concerned about this problem. The MIS department had suggested using
video disks as a possible solution. A video disk system was found that would be sufficient for the
companies needs at a cost of about $12 million. It was estimated that the system would take two years to
install and make compatible with existing information systems. Another, less attractive was using
microfilm. A microfilm system would require underwriters to go to a single keyboard to request paper
copies of files. The cost of a microfilm system was $5 million.
Questions:
1. What do you recommend? Should the company implement one of the new technologies, if yes,
why?
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
2. An operations analyst suggested that company employees shared a “dump on the clerks”
mentality. Explain.
Caselet 2
Harrison T. Wenk III is 43, married, and has two children, ages 10 and 14. He has a master‟s degree
in education and teachers junior high school music in a small town in Ohio. Harrison‟s father passed
away two months ago, leaving his only child an unusual business opportunity. According to his
father‟s will, Harrison has 12 months to become active in the family food-catering business, Kare-
Full Katering, Inc., or it will be sold to two key employees for a reasonable and fair price. If Harrison
becomes involved, the two employees have the option to purchase a significant, but less than
majority, interest in the firm. Harrison‟s only involvement with this business, which his grandfather
established, was as an hourly employee during high school and college summers. He is confident that
he could learn and perhaps enjoy the marketing side of the business, and that he could retain the longtime
head of accounting/finance. But he would never really enjoy day-to-day operations. In fact, he
doesn‟t understand what operations management really involves. In 1991 Kare-Full Katering, Inc. had
$3.75 million in sales in central Ohio. Net profit after taxes was $ 105,000, the eleventh consecutive
year of profitable operations and the seventeenth in the last 20 years. There are 210 employees in this
labor-intense business. Institutional contracts account for over 70 percent of sales and include partial
food services for three colleges, six commercial establishments) primarily manufacturing plants and
banks), two long -term care facilities, and five grade schools. Some customer location employs a
permanent operations manager; others are served from the main kitchens of Kare-Full Katering.
Harrison believes that if he becomes active in the business, one of the two key employees, the vice
president of operations, will leave the firm. Harrison has decided to complete the final two months of
this school year and then spend the summer around Kare-Full Katering – as well as institutions with
their own food services – to assess whether he wants to become involved in the business. He is
particularly interested in finding out as much as possible about operations. Harrison believes he owes
it to his wife and children to fairly evaluate this opportunity.
Questions:
1. Prepare a worksheet of operations activities that Harrison should inquire about this summer.
2. If you were Harrison, what would you do? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This Section Consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What do you mean by Tactical Planning? What are the mathematical approaches to aggregate
planning?
2. What is the concept of forecasting in operation? List the different types of forecasting methods.
END OF SECTION C
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Management Information Systems
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice questions and Short Note type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. Management Information System is mainly dependent upon:
a. Accounting
b. Information
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
2. The most important attribute of information quality that a manager requires is:
a. Presentation
b. Relevance
c. Timeliness
d. None of the above
3. Human Resource Information Systems are designed to:
a. Produce pay checks and payrolls reports
b. Maintain personnel records
c. Analyze the use of personnel in business operations
d. Development of employees to their full potential
4. Operational Accounting System include:
a. Inventory control
b. Cost accounting reports
c. Development of financial budgets and projected financial statements
d. None of the above
5. EIS stands for:
a. Executive Information System
b. Excellent Info System
c. Excessive Information System
d. None of the above
6. Intranet provide a rich set of tools for those people:
Examination Paper of Management Information Systems
IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
a. Who are members of the different company or organization
b. Who are members of the same company or organization
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
7. Which one is not the future of wireless technology?
a. E-mail
b. VOIP
c. RFID
d. Telegram
8. OLTP stands for:
a. Online Transactional Processing
b. Online Transmission Processing
c. Online Transactional Process
d. None of the above
9. Which one of the following is not considered as future of m-commerce:
a. Ubiquity
b. Localization
c. Simple authentication
d. Common operation
10. Which of the following is not the level of decision making:
a. Management control
b. Activity control
c. Operational control
d. Strategic decision making
Part Two:
1. What are the „Strategic Information Systems‟?
2. Write down the various business model of internet.
3. What is „Network Bandwidth‟?
4. Differentiate between OLTP and OLPP.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Management Information Systems
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Overview of our Client’s Strategy
Our client had an online store. They were spending $15,000 each month on pay per click
advertising. This resulted in about $225,000 per month in sales. They didn‟t know which clicks
were leading to sales because they didn‟t track the clicks. There rankings in the natural listings was
minimal because they hadn‟t done keywords research on what visitors were using to try to find a
site like there‟s. They weren‟t able to quantity results because their we statistics program only
showed very general traffic information. They were also doing an irregular email newsletter even
though they had more than 32,000 e-mails in their database.
Analysis of the situation
In the natural listings we suspected they were being penalized by the search enines for duplicate
content. The search engines frown on this because they feel this is trying to fool them. Google will
often give a site like this something called “Supplement Results”, which means that the search
engines know the page exists but doesn‟t have any content in their database. We also suspected
their email newsletter was being blocked by many spam blockers because the names of the products
they sold were often on used in spam e-mails.
Implementation of a Solution
For the pay per click advertising we started tracking the clicks down to the individual terms and the
actual results that came from them. We were able to delete terms that were not getting enough sales
and increase the bids on ones that brought sales. For the natural listings we did keywords research
and focused on the main keywords on the content for the home page and in the META tags. We
also found that visitors search on product names rather than manufactures, so in the title tag for the
page we switched and put the product name before the manufacturer. With the newsletter, we used
a good mix of graphics and content to appease the spam blockers, as well as put the product names
in graphics so they wouldn‟t be blocked. In order to analyze of the site‟s traffic, we implemented a
powerful web statistics program.
Results of our work
Through our tactics, our clients were able to move up to #4 on Google for their main search term,
which got a lot of traffic. With pay per click, they went from $.43. They decrease their budget to
$10,000 per month, yet were able to increase their traffic by 33 percent. Through our optimization
of their pay per click, their cost per conversion to sale decreased by at least 45 percent. The
deliverability of their newsletter increased as well. Within a year, their sales increased to over
$600,000 per month.
Questions:
1. Discuss the client strategy for the success of store.
2. Suppose if you are the client maker what would you suggest for the client.
Caselet 2
Examination Paper of Management Information Systems
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
Data Warehouse is a massive independent business database system that is populated with data that
has been extracted from a range of sources. The data is held separately from its origin and is used to
help to improve the decision-making process.
Many traditional Databases are involved in recording day to day operational activities of the
business, called Online Transaction Processing (OLTP), COMMONLY IMPLEMENTED IN
Airline Bookings and Banking Systems, for faster‟s response and better control over data.
After establishment of OLTP Systems, reports and summaries can be drawn for giving inputs to
decision-making process and this process is called Online Analytical Processing (OLAP).
For better customer relationships management strategy, the call centre‟s and data Warehouse works
as a strategic tool for decision-support which requires lot of time for establishment, and needs to be
updated with operational information on daily weekly or monthly basis.
Data Warehouse is used for proactive strategies formulation strategies formulation in critical and
complex situations. A number of CRM vendors are advocating for single integrated customer
database which includes call centre, web sites, branches and direct mail, but it lacks in analytical
functioning of data warehouse. This Database can‟t be expanded also, and carry decision support
operations on call centre Database becomes slow & the query processing and inquiries andling
operations also become slow & inefficient for agents dealing with customers.
Data Warehouse is must for identifying most profitable & loyal customers and those customers can
be offered better customized services which increase the chances of additional profits.
Although call centre system & data warehouse are altogether different systems yet dependent on
each other to fully exploit their potential respectively.
Questions:
1. Explain the role of data warehousing in the functioning of a call centre.
2. How the response time in performing OLAP queries can be improved?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer. (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Explain the term e-commerce. Also explain the history and limitations of e-commerce.
2. What do you understand by the term “Database”? Explain the various database models in
detail.
END OF SECTION C

Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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Digital Marketing
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice and Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. If Coca-Cola were to pay Web surfers a small fee to watch their ads, these ads would be called:
a) Interstitials.
b) Content sponsorships.
c) Banner ads.
d) Browser ads.
2. Which of the following marketing practices would be about the same thing as the Internet
practice of viral marketing?
a) coupon clipping
b) word-of-mouth marketing
c) disintermediation
d) Tele-marketing
3. Which of the following Web sites is the best illustration of a Web community?
a) Ben& Jerry‘s Ice Cream—www.benjerry.com.
b) Nike—www.nike.com.
c) Hallmark Greeting Cards—www.hallmark.com.
d) ivillage—www.ivillage.com.
4. Jack Strong would like to receive up-to-date financial information so he can carefully manage
his financial portfolio. He decides to use Internet Financial Network‘s Info gate to supply
financial news, market data, and real-time stock quotes to his PC. Internet Financial Network is
supplying Mr. Strong with a ____________service.
a) Portal
b) corporate Web site
c) Webcasting
d) Interstitial
5. Webcasting is also known as _____________, as it affords an attractive channel through which
online marketers can deliver their Internet advertising or other information content.
a) pull programming
b) push programming
c) customized programming
d) viral programming
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6. Along with its considerable promise, e-commerce faces many challenges. All of the following,
according to the text, would be among those challenges EXCEPT:
a) Poor revenue potential.
b) Limited consumer exposure and buying.
c) Skewed user demographics and psychographics.
d) Chaos and clutter.
7. Online users still tend to be somewhat more upscale and more technology-oriented than the
general population. Which of the following e-commerce challenges most appropriately
corresponds with this statement?
a) ethical concerns
b) limited consumer exposure and buying
c) skewed user demographics and psychographics
d) chaos and clutter
8. One study found that a Web site must capture a Web surfer‘s attention within eight seconds or
lose them to another site. Which of the following e-commerce challenges most appropriately
corresponds with this statement?
a) ethical concerns
b) security
c) skewed user demographics and psychographics
d) chaos and clutter
9. The Johnson Company is seeking to expand its business onto the ―informati on highway‖ made
possible by recent advances in technology. To do this, the Johnson Company would most likely
choose the:
a) Internet.
b) Intranet.
c) Extranet.
d) Compunet.
10. Which of the following is not the example of business to consumer (B to C) e-commerce?
a) Amazon.com
b) e-bay.com
c) Dell.com
d) Lastminute.com
Part Two:
1. Differentiate between house of brands and branded house strategies in the context of the
virtual medium offered by the internet. Use corporate examples to illustrate your viewpoint
2. What are the different types of online advertisements?
3. Write a short note on adaptive conversation.
4. What is CGM? How can companies use CGM as an organizational resource to generate
positive word-of-mouth for its consumers?
END OF SECTION A
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Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
DOMINO’S
Organised Pizza business in India is 12 years old. It started when Domino‘s and Pizza Hut, the two
biggest Pizza chains with origins in US entered India and set up stores. Before that the only pizzas
that Indians were used to were from a very few Italian restaurants and chains like Nirula‘s. Pizzas
were also served in 5 star hotels and were considered a very premium food back then. The category
consumers are the young Indians in the age group of 18 to 35 yrs. from SEC A and B. Domino‘s
started its first store in India in 1995. Today, with 576 stores across 123 cities in India (as of 31st
March 2013), Domino‘s is the market leader in the organized Pizza category with 67% market share
and also the largest International QSR chain in the country. The environment is a self-service,
hygienic, air-conditioned environment with cheerful but not decorative interiors, often with seating
for 15 to 40 customers. Our stores are self-service without any cutlery and customers eat out of Pizza
boxes and with their hands.
In the following years, the campaigns were more product / promotion centric. The 30 mins or free
delivery promise became one element of the Ads. The brand positioning continued to be ‗Hungry
Kya?‘ The focus was to position the brand as the makers of great tasting pizzas. This was done
through the launch of many new indulging Pizza products with communication revolving around new
and tasty products & craving for the Domino‘s pizza. The delivery occasion was retained as a context
of all the communication. Some of the successful launches were 3 Cheese Pizza, Double Burst Pizza,
Double Cheese Crunch Pizza, Cheese Burst Pizza, Calzone, and Stuffed Crunch Pizza. However, we
were still seen as an expensive brand and it continued to be an opportunity for further growth. In
2006, we cracked this code as well with the launch of Fun Meal range of pizzas starting at 45/- price
point. In 2008, we launched the Pizza Mania range of Pizzas starting at Rs 35/-, and since then we
have become a mass player in the category straddling the entire spectrum of price points and
consumer requirements. The Pizza Mania launch made us a very accessible brand and we had lot of
new customers coming into our stores who had never tried pizzas before in their lives.
Questions:
1. How do we drive the frequency of our existing consumers and gain more share of eating out /
out-of-home food occasions?
2. How do we remain relevant in our positioning ‗Yeh Hai Rishton ka time‘ & further
impregnate it in consumer minds across 120+ cities in India where we are present and new
cities we are moving into?
Caselet -2
BlackBerry
Research in Motion is a leading manufacturer of wireless devices. The Canadian company‘s
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breakthrough product was and continues to be the BlackBerry. However, the business faces a number
of strategic challenges. RIM has seen its stock performance stagnate while rivals such
as Apple and Google have performed strongly and started to erode its market dominance.A number of
strategic shifts in the Smartphone market have affected the company adversely. First, Apple has
fundamentally changed the sector with the launch of the iPhone. The device has established a
dominant position, especially in the consumer segment, and is now making inroads in the corporate
market that has traditionally been BlackBerry‘s dominant space. More recently, Apple has entered the
tablet PC market with the iPad. Second, the sharp growth in take-up of smart phones using Google‘s
Android operating system is also eating into BlackBerry‘s market share. These two challenges have
had a double-whammy negative impact on RIM as both volume growth and margins have eroded with
increased competition high quality global journalism requires investment. While some investors and
analysts have called for a dramatic change in RIM‘s operations, others fear that the company will
dilute its core competence by trying to compete with the iPhone and the Android platform. Instead,
RIM has taken a multipronged strategic approach. First, the company has strengthened its presence in
the enterprise market by introducing a number of new BlackBerry models, many of which have
improved touch screens to make the user experience more akin to competitor devices. Second, the
company has made strides in getting its ―App Store‖ off the ground. While it still lags behind the
iPhone and Android app stores, it has reached a critical mass with more than 15,000 apps, which at
least gives it a presence. A number of strategic shifts in the Smartphone market have affected the
company adversely. Second, the sharp growth in take-up of Smartphone using Google‘s Android
operating system is also eating into BlackBerry‘s market share. In recent years, avid BlackBerry users
were tempted by the iPhone. Now, the BlackBerry line has all the multimedia functionality of the
competitors, along with its core strength of security. The company‘s recent marketing strategy
showcasing the multimedia and social networking functionality of devices also suggests that RIM is
serious about expanding its consumer market share.
1. Blackberry usually launches significant campaigns for the promotion of its product ranges. List all
the campaigns where blackberry has attempted to use the behavioral Internet theory for marketing.
2. Make a chart to analyze success and failure points of the brand.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
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1. How can companies like Apple make use of influential individuals after identifying them?
Can the company benefit from a blogger outreach programme or a community programme or
use WhatsApp for leveraging influential customers?
2. Identify and list tools being used by companies for online campaign management.
END OF SECTION C
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Social Media Marketing
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice and Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Internet advertising has some weaknesses because
a) It cannot reach a global audience
b) It does not deliver good targeted reach
c) It is not easy to track
d) It is not emotive
2. Which of the following is not a weakness of using online in the media plan?
a) It is not emotive
b) It is subject to high levels of clutter
c) It can reach a global and local audience
d) It can be intrusive
3. Mobile marketing to-date is most successful among
a) Asian consumers
b) Younger consumers
c) Spanish consumers
d) American consumers
4. Mobile marketing has innovative ways to reach the consumer. Which of the following is not
one of them?
a) Barcode calls-to-action
b) Mobile apps
c) Yellow pages advertising
d) Mobile retail payments
5. Geotargeting allows an advertising campaign to concentrate on a fixed locale through mobile
technology
a) True
b) False
6. One advantage of Mobile marketing is that it is not
a) Inferior in its creative possibilities
b) Place-based media
c) Prone to security breaches
d) Dependent on GPS systems
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7. Mobile marketers are able to reach audiences
a) In real time
b) Using a ‗push‘ strategy
c) Using a ‗pull‘ strategy
d) All of the above
8. The statistics on unique visitors on a mobile device are highly reliable
a) True
b) False
9. One weakness of using mobiles in a media plan is
a) The message is long-lived
b) Privacy issues are of great concern among mobile users
c) All devices are standardized for easy use across operating systems
d) Rich content delivery is better than on a computer
10. SIM stands for
a) Web 2.0 technologies
b) Social Instant Medium
c) Social Influence Marketing
d) Social Media Marketing
Part Two:
1. What is Social CRM? What are its functions and benefits?
2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of Search Engine Marketing?
3. Explain the elements of Online Promotion Mix in Marketing.
4. Explain in detail the basis and types of Market Segmentation.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet – 1
Footwear
You are a leading local manufacturer of premium footwear and aspire to expand your brand.
On the basis of above. Answer the following questions:
1. What will be your broad strategy to use the Internet for your goals?
2. Explain briefly steps you would adopt to make your website.
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3. Explain innovative ways through which you will attract people to your website and make them
buy.
Caselet – 2
Twitter and Lok Sabha Elections 2014
Twitter is characterized by micro blogging – content, that is, short and on target, courtesy the 140
character requirement. The medium found immense appeal amongst the politicians and also became
an online battle ground between rival parties.
The ease of usage and the rapid proliferation of content made it a hangout of veterans such as
Narendra Modi, Arvind Kejriwal, Shushma Swaraj, amongst others. The content hosted on Twitter
soon became the basis for political debates on Television. Twitter, India setup a dedicated vertical
whose mandate was to get political parties, politicians and influencers to engage with their audience
on Twitter. Acceptance of the virtual world and the convenience provided by the medium to reach the
masses was the flavour of the year.
1. How did Facebook, Twitter, and Google use innovative techniques to facilitate conversations and
election coverage?
2. How did political parties pro-actively react to the changes in society, education and Internet
Literacy and make use of the Internet to target the youth?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. How can a company use YouTube strategically for its brand communication? Why is YouTube
such an important site in terms of search?
2. Explain with an example, how Google Analytics helps you measure traffic on your website?
How is the data helpful for your overall marketing efforts?
END OF SECTION C


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Human Resource Management
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others.
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of those job requirements.
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job.
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None of the above
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as:
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
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6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events.
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None of the above
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals:
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high.
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization.
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives.
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. Explain the importance of Career Planning in industry.
2. Write the features of HRM.
3. Briefly explain the concept of Performance Appraisal.
4. Explain On-Job and Off Job Training.
END OF SECTION A
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Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Case let 1
Trust them with knee-jerk reactions,” said Vikram Koshy, CEO, Delta Software India, as he looked at the quarterly report of Top Line Securities, a well-known equity research firm. The firm had announced a downgrade of Delta, a company listed both on Indian bourses and the NASDAQ. The reason? “One out of every six development engineers in the company is likely to be benched during the remaining part of the year.” Three analysts from Top Line had spent some time at Delta three weeks ago. Koshy and his team had explained how benching was no different from the problems of excess inventory, idle time, and surplus capacity that firms in the manufacturing sector face on a regular basis, “Delta has witnessed a scorching pace of 30 per cent growth during the last five years in a row,” Koshy had said, “What is happening is a corrective phase.” But, evidently, the analysts were unconvinced.
Why Bench?
Clients suddenly decide to cut back on IT spends Project mix gets skewed, affecting work allocation Employee productivity is set to fall, creating slack working conditions. High degree of job specialization leads to redundancy
What are the options?
Quickly cut costs in areas which are non-core look for learning’s from the manufacturing sector Focus on alternative markets like Europe and Japan Move into products, where margins are better. Of course, the Top Line report went on to cite several other “signals,” as it said: the rate of annual hike in salaries at Delta would come down to 5 per cent (from between 20 and 30 per cent last year); the entry-level intake of engineers from campuses in June 2001, would decline to 5 per cent (unlike the traditional 30 per cent addition to manpower every year); and earnings for the next two years could dip by between 10 and 12 per cent. And the loftiest of them all: “The meltdown at Nasdaq is unlikely to reverse in the near future.” “Some of the signals are no doubt valid. And ominous,” said Koshy, addressing his A-Team, which had assembled for the routine morning meeting. “But, clearly, everyone is reading too much into this business of benching. In fact, benching is one of the many options that our principals in the US have been pursuing as part of cutting costs right since September, 2000. They are also expanding the share of off-shore jobs. Five of our principals have confirmed that they would outsource more from Delta in India-which is likely to hike their billings by about 30 per cent. At one level, this is an opportunity for us. At another, of course, I am not sure if we should be jubilant, because they have asked for a 25-30 per cent cut in billing rates. Our margins will take a hit, unless we cut costs and improve productivity.” “Productivity is clearly a matter of priority now,” said Vivek Varadan, Vice-President (Operations). “If you consider benching as a non-earning mode, we do have large patches of it at Delta. As you are aware, it has not been easy to secure 70 per cent utilization of our manpower, even in normal times. I think we need to look at why we have 30 per cent bench before examining how to turn it into an asset.” “There are several reasons,” remarked Achyut Patwardhan, Vice-President (HR). “And a lot of it has to do with the nature of our business, which is more project-driven than product-driven. When you are managing a number of overseas and domestic projects simultaneously, as we do at Delta, people tend to go on the bench. They wait, as they complete one project, and are assigned the next. There are problems of coordination between projects, related to the logistics of moving people and resources from one customer to another. In fact, I am fine-tuning our monthly manpower utilization report to provide a breakup of bench costs into
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specifics-leave period, training programmes, travel time, buffers, acclimatization period et al.” “It would be worthwhile following the business model used by US principal Techno Inc,” said Aveek Mohanty, Director (Finance). “The company has a pipeline of projects, but it does not manage project by project. What it does is to slice each project into what it calls ‘activities’. For example, communication networking; user interface development; scheduling of processes are activities common to all projects. People move from one project to another. It is somewhat like the Activity Based Costing. It throws up the bench time straightaway, which helps us control costs and revenue better.” “I also think we should reduce our dependence on projects and move into products,” said Praveen Kumar, Director (Marketing). “That is where the opportunity for brand building lies. In fact, now is the time to get our technology guys involved in marketing. Multiskilling helps reduce the bench time.” “Benching has an analogy in the manufacturing sector,” said Girish Shahane, Vice-President (Services). “We could look for learning’s there. Many firms have adopted Just-In-Time (JIT) inventory as part of eliminating idle time. It would be worthwhile exploring the possibility of JIT. But the real learning lies in standardization of work. It is linked to what Mohanty said about managing by activities.” “At a broader level, I see several other opportunities,” said Koshy, “We can fill in the space vacated by US firms and move up the value chain. But before we do so, Delta should consolidate its position as the premier outsourcing centre. Since there are only two ways in which we can generate revenue-sell expertise or sell products-we should move towards a mix of both. Tie-ups with global majors will help. Now is the time to look beyond the US and strike alliances with firms in Europe- and also Japan-as part of developing new products for global markets.”
Questions:
1. Should benching be a matter of concern at Delta?
2. What are the risks involved in moving from a project-centric mode to a mix of projects and products?
Case let 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly, changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations: like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment; greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative career paths for such employees.
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4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past, Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the flight of talented employees
Question:
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought a radical changes in HRM.
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. Explain the legal provisions regarding safety of workers.

Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choices & Short Notes type Questions.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other’s attitudes& behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as:
a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
d. Brand image
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6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Write a note on importance of consumer behavior for a business firm.
2. Define the term ‘Price’.
3. Distinguish between Marketing Concept and Selling Concept.
4. What are the new trends in advertisement?
5. Briefly explain the following :
a) Socio –culture environment
b) Marketing environment interface.
END OF SECTION A
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Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Case let 1
Ask the company top brass what ‘almost there’ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories under one roof, Shoppers’ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers’ Stop is India’s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly announces, ‘We don’t sell, we help you buy.’ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail. Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally, common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men’s wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men’s clothing. The concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping experience. The first Shoppers’ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers’ Stop in Mumbai were women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women’s section. Later, it expanded to include children’s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in 1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers’ Stop laid the ground rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers’ Stop is that it knows how the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign retailer, the ‘basic construct’ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models. Shoppers’ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model. Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers’ Stop were taking lectures at management institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers’ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers’ Stop conducted surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase, walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch and feel the
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merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over. Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The company’s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families, kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The in-house wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers’ Stop to work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers’ Stop lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable designer wear. The line-up includes Levi’s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations, though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women’s wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point). Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers’ Stop’s business. Sometimes in-house brands plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen’s Club (FCC). With 60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor) in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the shopping experience to the slowing down of one’s internal clock and the beauty of the whole experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store’s benefits (in a highly oblique manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors’ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text – or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers’ Stop’s most expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers’ Stop, since its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.
Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers’ Stop?
2. Draw the typical profile(s) of Shoppers’ Stop customer segments.
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IIBM Institute of Business Management 5
3. How are Indian customers visiting Shoppers’ stop any different from customers of developed western countries?
4. How should Shoppers’ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
Case let 2
The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children. Sega’s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible games. In addition, Sega’s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn’s misstep benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony’s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in 70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eye-popping 64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo’s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adult-oriented material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the number of compatible games as Sony’s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega’s share had fallen to a low of 1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999 with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals, and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast’s introduction. By the end of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web, and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo’s Neptune and Sony’s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player. As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2 definitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only because it’s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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that were immediately available to gamers. Further enhancing the PS2’s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user’s easy access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an all-round entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment. However, some prospective customers were put off by the console’s initial price of $360. Shortly after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube would not run on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the company’s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product, as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions that rival Microsoft’s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony’s PlayStation 2, Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of the console and its controllers. As a result of developers’ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available. Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube. Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have high-speed access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional $39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft’s Xbox was $299. Prior to the introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299. Nintendo’s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001 the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season, 6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft’s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to $199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
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Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for
a mere $49. It had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent. The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in 2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors’ consoles. Thus Sega slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo’s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts). Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just 4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three companies can keep their names on the industry’s list of “high scorers”.
Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as e-mail?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 8
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. What is meant by sales promotion? Describe briefly the various methods of sales promotional tools used by business organizations to boost the sales. Explain any four methods of sales promotion?
2. Write notes on the fowling :
a) Explain right to safety.
b) What is right to consumer protection?
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END OF SECTION C

Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
IIBM Institute of Business Management 1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Subject Code-B-105 Examination Paper MM.100
Organizational Behaviour
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Notes type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. It is the degree to which a person identifies with a particular organization and its goals, & wishes to maintain membership in the organization.
a. Job involvement
b. Terminal value
c. Attitude
d. Value
2. _________ means moving information from the hidden area to the open area.
a. blind area
b. unknown area
c. public area
d. self disclosure
3. An approach in which the goals of one party are in direct conflict with the goals of the other party:
a. Negotiation
b. Distributive bargaining
c. Stress
d. None of the above
4. The measure of a person’s ability to operate within business organizations through social communication & interactions.
a. Transactional analysis
b. Interpersonal skill
c. Life position
d. Johari window
5. Where the source of power is in person’s control over rewarding outcomes, that power is called:
a. Coercive power
b. Referent power
c. Legitimate power
d. Reward power
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IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
6. It means melting resistance to change; the people who will be affected by the change come to accept the need for it.
a. Organization
b. Unfreezing
c. Changing
d. Refreezing
7. This training is also known as laboratory training, encounter groups & T-groups.
a. Sensitivity
b. Survey
c. Process
d. Team building
8. They are the things that come together to define a culture & reveal that the culture is about to those who pay attention to them.
a. Culture
b. Espoused value
c. Artifacts
d. Organizational culture
9. This stage encompasses all the learning that occurs before a new member joins the organizations.
a. Socialization
b. The Pre-arrival stage
c. Encounter stage
d. Metamorphosis stage
10. It refers to the behavior pattern adopted by a leader to influence the behavior of his subordinate for attaining the organizational goal.
a. Leadership
b. Traits of leadership
c. Leadership grid
d. Leadership style
Part Two:
1. Define Informal groups.
2. What do you understand by the term ‘Emotion’?
3. Write a note on ‘Reinforcement theory’.
4. Explain the terms ‘Attitudes and Values’.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Case let 1
M/s. ABC Ltd is a medium-sized engineering company producing a large-range of product lines according to customer requirements. It has earned a good reputation as a quick and reliable supplier to its customers because of which its volume of business kept on increasing. However, over the past one year, the Managing Director of the company has been receiving customer complaints due to delays in dispatch of products and at times the company has to pay substantial penalty for not meeting the schedule in time. The Managing Director convened an urgent meeting of various functional managers to discuss the issue. The marketing manager questioned the arbitrary manner of giving priority to products in manufacturing line, causing delays in wanted products and over-stocking of products which are not required immediately. Production Control Manager complained that he does not have adequate staff to plan and control the production function; and whatever little planning he does, is generally overlooked by shop floor manager. Shop floor managers complained of unrealistic planning, excessive machine breakdowns, power failure, and shortage of materials for scheduled products because of which it is impossible to stick to the schedule. Maintenance manager says that he does not get important spares required for equipment-maintenance because of which he cannot repair machines at a faster rate. Inventory control manager says that on one hand the company often accuses him of carrying too much stock and on other hand people are grumbling over shortages. Fed up by mutual mud-slinging, the Managing Director decided to appoint you, a bright management consultant with training in business management to suggest ways and means to put his “house in order”.
Questions:
1. How would you examine if there is any merit in the remarks of various functional managers?
2. What, in your opinion, could be the reasons for different Managerial thinking in this case?
3. How would you design a system of getting correct information about job status to identify delays quickly?
4. What would you suggest to promote co-ordinate interaction of various people to meet the scheduled dates?
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
Case let 2
Rajender Kumar was a production worker at competent Motors Limited (CML) which made components and accessories for the automotive industry. He had worked at CML for almost seven years as a welder, along with fifteen other men in the plant. All had received training in welding both on the job and through company sponsored external programmes. They had friendly relations and got along very well with one another. They played Volleyball in the playground regularly before retiring to the quarters allotted by the company. They work together in the company canteen, cutting Jokes on each other and making fun of everyone who dared to step into their privacy during lunch hour. Most of the fellows had been there for some length of time, except for two men who had joined the ranks only two months back. Rajender was generally considered to be the leader of the group, so it was no surprise that when the foreman of the new was transferred and his job was posted, Rajender applied for the job and got it.
There were only four other applicants for the job, two from mechanical section and two from outside, when there was a formal announcement of the appointment on a Friday afternoon, everyone in the group congratulated Rajender. They literally carried him on their shoulders, and bought him snacks and celebrated. On Monday morning, Rajender joined duty as Foreman. It was company practice for all foremen to wear blue jacket and a white shirt. Each man’s coat had his name badge sewn onto the left side pocket. The company had given two pairs to Rajender. He was proud to wear the coat to work on Monday. People who saw him from a distance went up to him and admired the new blue coat. There was a lot of kidding around calling Rajender as ‘Hero’, ‘Raja Babu’ and ‘Officer’ etc. One of the guys went back to his locker and returned with a long brush and acted as though he were removing dust particles on the new coat. After about five minutes of horseplay, all the men went back to work. Rajender went to his office to familiarize himself with the new job and environment. At noon, all the men broke for Lunch and went to the canteen to eat and take a break as usual. Rajender was busy when they left but followed after them a few minutes later. He bought the food coupon, took the snacks and tea and turned to face the open canteen. On the left-side corner of the room was his old work group; on the right-hand side of the canteen sat the other entire foreman in the plant—all in their smart blue coats.
At that point of time, silence descended on the canteen. Both groups looked at Rajender anxiously, waiting to see which group he would choose to eat with.
Questions:
1. Whom do you think Rajender will eat with? Why?
2. If you were one of the other foremen, what could you do to make Rajinder’s transition easier?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
IIBM Institute of Business Management 5
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. A large unit manufacturing electrical goods which has been known for its liberal personnel policies and fringe benefits is facing the problem of low productivity and high absenteeism. How should the management improve the organizational climate?
2. The leader is expected to play many roles & therefore he must be qualified to guide others to organizational achievement. On the basis of this explain the leadership skills & leadership traits.

Principles and Practices of Management
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choices & Short Notes type Questions.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple Choices:
1. A plan is a trap laid to capture the ________.
a. Future
b. Past
c. Policy
d. Procedure
2. It is the function of employing suitable person for the enterprise:
a. Organizing
b. Staffing
c. Directing
d. Controlling
3. ___________ means “ group of activities & employees into departments”:
a. Orientation
b. Standardization
c. Process
d. Departmentation
4. This theory states that authority is the power that is accepted by others:
a. Acceptance theory
b. Competence theory
c. Formal authority theory
d. Informal authority theory
5. It means dispersal of decision-making power to the lower levels of the organization:
a. Decentralization
b. Centralization
c. Dispersion
d. Delegation
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IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
6. This chart is the basic document of the organizational structure:
a. Functional chart
b. Posts chart
c. Master chart
d. Departmental chart
7. Communication which flow from the superiors to subordinates with the help of scalar chain is known as:
a. Informal communication
b. Downward communication
c. Upward communication
d. Oral communication
8. Needs for belongingness, friendship, love, affection, attention & social acceptance are
a. Physiological needs
b. Safety needs
c. Ego needs
d. Social needs
9. A management function which ensures “jobs to be filled with the right people, with the right knowledge, skill & attitude”:
a. Staffing defined
b. Job analysis
c. Manpower planning
d. Recruitment
10. It is a process that enables a person to sort out issues and reach to a decisions affecting their life:
a. Selection
b. Raining
c. Reward
d. Counseling
Part Two:
1. Differentiate between ‘Administration’ and ‘Management’.
2. What were the common drawbacks in classical and Neo classical theories of management?
3. Write a short note on “Line Organization.”
4. Write a short note on ‘Acceptance theory’.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Case let 1
Mr. Vincent, the Manager of a large supermarket, was taking a management course in the evening programme at the local college. The Professor had given an interesting but disturbing lecture the previous night on the various approaches to management. Vincent had always thought that management involved just planning, organizing and controlling. Now this Professor was saying that management could also be thought of as quantitative models, systems theory and analysis, and even something called contingency relationships. Vincent had always considered himself a good manager, and his record with the supermarket chain had proved it. He thought of himself, “I have never used operations research models, thought of my store as an open system, or developed or utilized any contingency relationship. By doing a little planning ahead, organizing the store, and making some things got done, I have been a successful manager. That other stuff just does not make sense. All the professor was trying to do was complicate things. I guess I will have to know it for the test, but I am sticking with my old plan, organize and control approach to managing my store.”
Questions:
1. Critically analyze Mr. Vincent’s reasoning.
2. If you were the professor and you knew what was going through Vincent’s mind, what would you say to Vincent?
Case let 2
The Regional Administration Office of a company was hastily set up. Victor D’Cuhna a young executive was directly recruited to take charge of Data Processing Cell of this office. The data processing was to help the administrative office in planning and monitoring. The officer cadre of the administrative office was a mix of directly recruited officers and promotee officers (promotion from within the organization).
Females dominated the junior clerical cadre. This cadre was not formally trained. The administrative office had decided to give these fresh recruits on-the-job training because when results were not upto the expectations blame was brought on the Data Processing Cell. Victor D’Cuhna realized that the administrative office was heading for trouble. He knew that his task would not be easy and that he had been selected because of his experience, background and abilities. He also realized that certain functional aspects of the administrative office were not clearly understood by various functionaries, and systems and procedures were blindly and randomly followed. Feedback was random, scanty and controversial, and Data Processing Cell had to verify every item of feedback. Delays were inevitable. D’Cuhna sought the permission of senior management to conduct a seminar on communication and feedback of which he was an expert. The permission was grudgingly given by the senior management. Everyone appreciated the seminar. Following the first seminar, D’Cuhna conducted a one week training course for the clerical cadre, especially for the junior, freshly recruited clerks. Amongst other topics, D’Cuhna laid emphasis on
Examination Paper of Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
filing system, information tracking, communication, and feedback. This helped reorient attitudes to some extent. But the female clerks preferred to ignore the theme and widely circulated the belief that D’Cuhna was an upstart and a show off. Within a short time, considerable friction had been generated in the administrative office While directly recruited officers supported D’Cuhna’s initiative and the specialist officers admired him, senior management became cautious and uncomfortable. The junior promotee officers were prejudiced against him. The grand finale followed swiftly. D’Cuhna happened to get annoyed with a female clerk. During the absence of her officer, who was on sick leave and had not been substituted by another officer, she began submitting nil returns. D’Cuhna took pains to explain to her that for certain topics a nil feedback was not tenable. The current status had to be reported— the stage at which the matter was pending, what had been done, and what would be done about it? The lady reported that it was none of his business to tell her this. He should talk to her officer when the officer reports back from leave. D’Cuhna said he would, but in the meanwhile she should present the correct picture. When D’Cuhna called for the files, she refused to part with them. D’Cuhna fired her and reported the situation to the Chief Regional Manager. The other ladies were up in the arms against D’Cuhna. The lady also complained to higher management that D’Cuhna had made passes at her. Other ladies supported her complaint. She also complained that D’Cuhna had no business to scold her. D’Cuhna countered that had there been a male clerk in her place he would have scolded him too. When females enjoyed equal rights with males, D’Cuhna felt he must remain impartial. Nevertheless, D’Cuhna was transferred to another place. The transfer to another place, rather than to another department in same place, was particularly humiliating to him. A shocked and disillusioned D’Cuhna quit the enterprise.
Questions:
1. Diagnose the problem and enumerate the reasons for the failure of D’Cuhna.
2. What could D’Cuhna have done to avoid the situation in which he found himself?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. What is Training? Explain the different methods of training.
2. Explain Decision-Making process of an organization.
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END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION C


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Corporate Governance
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Note Types questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. ________A group of persons chosen to govern the affairs of a corporation or other large institution.
a .Memorandum of Association
b. Nomination Committee
c. Board of Directors
d. Shareholders
2. BIFR stands for_______
a. Board of India and Financial Reconstruction
b. Board of Industrial and Financial Reconstruction
c. Board of Industrial and Finance Reconstruction
d. None of the above
3. ________is a review in which an auditor analyzes and verifies various records and processes relating to a
company‟s quality program.
a. Cost Audit
b. Quality Audit
c. Internal Audit
d. None of the above
4. Which of the following comes under in Justification?
a. Long Run Viability
b. Better Environment
c. Public Image
d. All of the above
5. USEPA stands for_______
6. The existence of a single producer or seller which is producing or selling a product which has no close
substitutes is called_______
a. Externalities
b. Price control
c. Monopoly
d. None of the above
7. SEBI stands for______
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a. Securities and exchange Board of India
b. Stock and exchange Board of India
c. Self-regulatory and exchange Board of India
d. None of the above
8. Which of the following issue is not come under in corporate Governance?
a. Correct Preparation
b. Internal Control
c. oversight and management risk
d. Compensation of CEO and other Directors
9. Shareholder are required to inform the company in writing of any change in their address quoting their
folio number is known as______
a. Change of address
b. Transposition of shares
c. None receipt of Dividend
d. All of the above
10. Which of the following comes under External corporate Governance controls?
a. Competition
b. Managerial labour market
c. Debt Covenants
d. All of the above
Part Two:
1. What are the scopes of corporate governance?
2. Discuss the basic rights of shareholders?
3. List the type of “Auditors”.
4. Write a short note on corporate social responsibility.
Section B: Caselets (40 Marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words)
Caselet 1
Real Juice Company
The company is in the business of producing and marketing fruit juices. Ritu joshi and Rohit Jain were
looking at the ad copy and turning it over and over again in their mind. The copy read, “The best fitness plan
for you real fruit, honest juice and no sugar. This was the main copy line. The more Ritu joshi repeated this
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Corporate Governance
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
line in her mind the uneasier she became. Something is wrong in the copy, she said to Rohit jain, the
marketing head. We cannot say best for health when we know for sure that the juice contain preservatives
and food color.
Rohit jain said, I don‟t see if anything is wrong in this. With food colors and preservatives added we couldn‟t
say it is best. This is what is wrong m replied Ritu.
Rohit said, but this is hyperbole and permitted by law. There is nothing wrong in saying this. Have you not
almost noticed all detergent brands say for best wash or whitest wash? This is simply a way of putting your
claim of brand‟s superiority. We are not talking about detergent washes and fabrics it is a health and fitness
fruit juice. We could not say something like‟, a great way to plan your fitness programme‟ or something like
that. We are saying real fruit, honest juice, and no sugar‟ … not a word about food color and preservatives‟.
Any consumer can contest our claim.”
Rohit Jain though for a moment then said, “let us get the legal opinion from our lawyer, Amit soni, to be on
the safe guard.
Amit listened to what Ritu had to say then said, “Companies use advertising to provide information to
consumers and offer alternatives in a competitive market situation. Advertising is false when it says A=B
and that is not true. But the ad is misleading; it falls under the category of unfair trade practice.” Loudly
reading the ad copy, Amit said‟” hyperbole such as best, newest most effective way, are permissible and
consumers are unlikely to take such claims with ant seriousness. When a brand says its air-conditioner is best
or most efficient, consumers know that this is just a manner of speech and do not truly believe and put their
money on such claims.
“Yes, Real juice passes the legal test fine, but ethically it won‟t be correct,” said Ritu joshi. “Please
understand. Here you are not making a claim,” said Amit soni.
Amit soni said,” comparative advertising is healthy but the advertiser must be clear about the claims to be
made. In this case, you are saying that Teal juice is good because it comes in cans and bottled drinks are not
as good. This is a direct attack on bottled drinks. Advertiser does not disclose all the parameters they have
considered in their conclusion of „best‟. They may select some major ones or may cheese to highlight the
trivial ones and ignore the major ones. These things happen every day and are not strictly provided under the
law. There must be prima facie evidence of damage or misrepresentation to establish a case of unfair trade
practice.” “so, we are legally safe,” said Rohit jain. “We will reword this campaign, but our other campaigns
have passed to muster.”
Ritu joshi felt differently, she said, “legally we may safe, but we have to also take an ethical view.”
We must not forget that our primary platform is health and fitness. This convenience angle is also crating
and impression of „good for health‟. I believe that as responsible advertisers, we have to be more concerned
about the ethical aspects than merely the legal angle. This is where we come to the line between what is legal
and what is ethical. We may be legally right but our act could be unethical if the word or pictures in the ad
could lead the consumer to believe something that is not true. The aura of the fitness instructor used as
endorser creates an impression that the information is coming to consumers from an environment where
there are people whose opinion consumer‟s view as being correct. Otherwise why use the instructor as
endorser.”
Question:
1. Analyze the issues in the case.
2. Why should advertiser bother about ethics if the ads measure up to legal parameters
Caselet 2
Over the course of Microsoft‟s history, the board has developed corporate governance practices to help it
fulfill its responsibilities to shareholders to oversee the work of management and the company‟s business
results. The governance practices are memorialized in these guidelines to assure that the board will have the
necessary authority and practices in place to review and evaluate the company‟s business operation as
Examination Paper of Corporate Governance
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
needed and to make decision that are independent of the company‟s management. The guidelines are also
intended to align the interests of directors and management with those of Microsoft‟s shareholders.
The guidelines are subject to future refinement or changes as the board may find necessary or advisable for
Microsoft in order to achieve these objectives.
Board composition and selection: independent Directors
1. Board Size: The board believes 8 to 10 is an appropriate size based on the company‟s present
circumstances. The board periodically evaluates whether a larger or smaller slate of directors would
be preferable
2. Selection of Board members: All members are elected annually by the company‟s shareholders,
except as noted below with respect to vacancies.
The board may fill vacancies in existing or new directors‟ positions.
3) Board membership criteria: The governance and nominating committee works with the board on
the annual basis to determine the appropriate characteristics, skills and experience for the board as a
whole and its individual board members, the board takes into accounts many factor including general
understanding of marketing, finance and other discipline relevant to the success of a large publicity –
traded company in today‟s business environment; understanding of Microsoft‟s business on a
technical level.
4) Board Composition: Mix of management and independent directors. The board believes that,
except during periods of temporary vacancies, a majority of its directors must be independents.
5) Term Limits: Director who have served on the board for an extended period of time are able to
provide valuable insight into the operation and future of the company based on their experience with
an understanding of the company‟s history, policies and objectives.
6) Retirement Policy: The board believes that 75 is an appropriate retirement age for outside directors.
7) Directors with significant job changes: The board believes that any director who retires from his
or her present employment, or who materially changes his or her position, should tender resignation
to the board.
8) Selection of CEO and Chairman: The board selects the company‟s CEO and Chairman in the
manner that it determines to be in the best interests of the company‟s shareholders.
Board meetings: involvement of Senior Management
9) Board meeting-agenda: The Chairman of the board and CEO, taking into account suggestions from
other members of the board, will set the agenda for each board meeting, and will distribute the
agenda in advance to each director.
10) Advance distribution of material: All information relevant to board‟s understanding of matters to
be discussed at an upcoming board meeting should be distributed in writing or electronically to all
members in advance.
11) Access to employees: The board should have access to company employees in order to ensure that
directors can ask all questions and glean all information necessary to fulfill their duties.
12) Executive session of independent directors: The independent directors of the company will meet
regularly o executive session, i.e., with no management directors or management present, at least
three times each fiscal year.
Performance Evaluation: Succession Planning
13) Annual CEO Evaluation: The chair of the governance and nominating committee leads the
independent directors in conducting a review at least annually of the performance of the CEO and
communicates the result of the review to the CEO.
14) Succession Planning: As part of the annual officer evaluation process, the compensation committee
works with the CEO to plan for CEO succession, as well as to develop plan for interim succession
for the CEO in the event of an unexpected occurrences.
15) Board self-evaluation: The governance and nominating committee is responsible for conducting an
annual evaluation of the performance of the full board and reports its conclusion to the board.
Compensation
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16) Board compensation review: Company management should report to the board on an annual basis
as to how the company‟s director compensation practices compare with those of other large public
corporations.
17) Directors’ stock ownership: The board believes that, in order to align the interests of directors and
shareholders, directors should have a significant financial stake in the company.
Committees
18) Number and types of committees: The board has 5 committees- an Audit committee, a
compensation committee, governance and nominating committee, a finance committee, and an
antitrust compliance committee. The board may add new committees or remove existing committees
as it deems advisable in the fulfillment of its primary responsibilities.
a. Audit committee
b. Compensation committee
c. Governance and Nominating committee
d. Finance committee
19) Composition of committee: Committee chairperson. The audit, compensation, governance and
nominating and antitrust compliance committees consist solely of independent directors.
20) Committee Meetings and Agenda: The chairperson of each committee is responsible for
developing, together with relevant company managers, the committee‟s general agenda and
objectives and for setting the specific agenda for committee meeting.
Miscellaneous
21) Review of governance guidelines: The practices memorialized in these guidelines have developed
over a period of years. The board expects to review these guidelines at least every two years as
appropriate.
Questions:
1. List the number and types of committees.
2. Discuss the Performance evaluation planning in brief.
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carry 15 marks each.
 Detailed information should from the part of your Answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words)
1. Define corporate governance; explain the principles of corporate governance?
2. Distinguish between the Anglo-American Model and the German Model.

Examination Paper of Corporate Governance Professional
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Corporate Governance Professional
Guidelines for paper
 Total No. of Questions is 100.
 The minimum passing marks is 40%.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
 Answer all the Questions.
Multiple Choices:
1. Corporate Governance is________.
a) About ethical conduct in business
b) Direct or indirect concerns in the organization
c) A manufacturing system
d) None of the above
2. The term corporate governance is derived from the__________.
a) Greek word
b) English word
c) French word
d) Latin word
3. The definition “Corporate Governance is the system by which business directed and controlled”
is given by a)
SEBI committee
b) OECD committee
c) Cadbury committee
d) All of the above
4. Internal control is implemented by the________.
a) Board of directors
b) Audit committee
c) Management
d) All of the above
5. OECD stands for_______________
6. Which of the following have the power to hire fire and compensate the top management?
a) Board of directors
b) Audit committee
c) Shareholders
d) Management
7. CII stands for _________________
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8. The managers are expected to act in the interest of:
a) Audit committee
b) Stakeholders
c) Employees
d) Customers
9. To endorse the organization strategy, develop directional policy, appoint, supervise and remunerate
senior executives and to ensure accountability of the organization to its owners and authorities is the
responsibility of:
a) CEO
b) Manager
c) Top management
d) Board of directors
10. SEBI stands for_________________
11. The role of corporate governance is_______
a) To ensure the efficient use of resources
b) It increases the shareholders value
c) Reduce the procurement and inventory cost
d) All of the above
12. Which of the following is not the issue of corporate governance?
a) Internal control
b) Compensation of CEO and other directors
c) Management of risk
d) Rights of corporation
13. The annual report should not include a)
How decision are taken by the board
b) The name of the chairman, CEO and other directors
c) Ability to hire management
d) The number of meeting
14. __________ is equal to the market price of his holding in shares.
a) Stakeholders wealth
b) Ethical conduct
c) Shareholder’s wealth
d) None of these
15. The key element of good corporate governance principle include a)
Honesty
b) Mutual respect
c) Performance orientation
d) All of the above
16. SOX stands for_____________________
17. The commonly accepted principle of corporate governance are___________
a) Protection of shareholders right
b) Role and responsibilities of board
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c) Interest of other stakeholders
d) All of the above
18. CII developed code of corporate governance in__________________
a) 1997
b) 1996
c) 1994
d) 1878
19. The property right is views simply as _________________
a) Planning right
b) Control right
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
20. In which type of model the supervisory board is elected by shareholders and labor unions?
a) Japanese model
b) Anglo American model
c) German model
d) The Indian perspective
21. Which of the following come under the five principles of ethical power for organization?
a) Purpose
b) Pride
c) Patience
d) All of the above
22. Which of the following are the theories of corporate governance?
a) Shareholders theory vs. stakeholders theory
b) Stewardship theory
c) Property right theory
d) All of the above
23. The stewardship theory is__________
a) Control oriented
b) Involvement oriented
c) Both a &b
d) None of these
24. ____________ include government nominees and representatives of financial institutions.
a) Board of directors
b) Creditors, suppliers
c) Nominee directors
d) Chief executive officer
25. The __________ oversees internal control and disclosure controls and procedures for financial
reporting.
a) Nominating committee
b) Audit committee
c) Board committee
d) Higgs committee
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26. MDAR stands for_______________
27. Liaison committee designed to make a link between two groups or committees.
a) True
b) False
28. Cadbury committee established in______________
a) 1999
b) 1995
c) 1992
d) 2002
29. How many recommendation is made by CII code a)
17
b) 18
c) 16
d) 19
30. Kumar mangalam committee is appointed by the__________
a) CII
b) SEBI
c) Government
d) None of the above
31. The remuneration of the non-executive directors should be decided by the______
a) Board of directors
b) Top management
c) Stakeholders
d) Entire board
32. Which of the following committee was appointed by the SEBI to make recommendations on the
representation of independent directors on company board and the composition of audit
committee?
a) Cadbury committee
b) Kumar mangalam committee
c) Naresh Chandra committee
d) Board committee
33. Basic shareholders rights include the right to.
a) Secure methods of ownership
b) Convey or transfer shares
c) Participate and vote in general shareholder meetings
d) All of the above
34. Which of the following is use to ensure that the takeover bids are serious?
a) Disclosure
b) Trigger
c) Escrow
d) Creeping acquisition
35. Which of the following are the natures of complaints by shareholders?
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a) Non receipt of dividend
b) Change of address
c) Transmission of shares
d) All of the above
36. The word “transmission” meansa)
Transfer by operation of law
b) Transfer by operation
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
37. Competition, debt covenants, takeover and media pressure are the_____
a) Internal corporate governance controls
b) External corporate governance control
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
38. Simple directors who attends board meeting of a company and participate of a company and
participate in the matters before the board isa)
Ordinary directors
b) Managing directors
c) Executive directors
d) Shadow directors
39. The director who perform a specific role in a company under a service contract which requires
a regular, possibly daily, involvement in management is known as________
a) Non-executive director
b) Additional director
c) Executive director
d) Ordinary director
40. Which of the following is the duty of directors?
a) Statutory duties
b) Duties of general nature
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
41. Which of the following are the not the general duty of directors?
a) Duty of good faith
b) Duty of care
c) Duty not to delegate
d) To disclose interest
42. A document that specifies the regulations for a company’s operation is known as________
a) Memorandum of association
b) Articles of association
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
43. Any person, company, or other institution that owns at least one share in a company is known
as________
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a) Stakeholder
b) Employees
c) Shareholder
d) Customer
44. Nomination committee is appointed by the a)
CEO
b) Board of directors
c) Management
d) Audit committee
45. The profit earned by the company with reference to the cost of capital in terms of economic profit
is referred to as______
a) Pay-performance
b) Organization bylaws
c) Economic value added
d) None of the above
46. Which of the following are the types of the auditor?
a) Internal
b) External
c) Government
d) All of the above
47. The auditors specialize in crimes and are used by law enforcement organization when
financial documents are involved in a crime is known as_______
a) Forensic auditor
b) Government auditor
c) External auditor
d) Internal auditor
48. Set of standards against which the quality of audits is performed and may be judges is______
a) Generally accepted accounting principles
b) General accepted auditing standards
c) Audit
d) None of the above
49. A ______________ audit is a review in which an auditor analyzes and verifies various records and
processes relating to a company’s quality programs.
a) Cost audit
b) Forensic audit
c) Quality audit
d) None of the above
50. The important aspects of cost audit are_______
a) Property audit
b) Efficiency audit
c) Both a & b
d) Government audit
51. SICA stands for_______________
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52. BIFR stands for_______________
53. Basic principles of audit are_______________
a) Integrity, objectivity & independence
b) Confidentiality
c) Documentation
d) All of the above
54. As per the SEBI guidelines, the audit committee shall meet at leasta)
Twice a year
b) Thrice a year
c) Once a year
d) None of the above
55. _________________ opined that the chairman of the audit committee should be an
independent director.
a) Cadbury committee
b) Board committee
c) KM Birla committee
d) Audit committee
56. An audit committee should aware of technological changes, which is_________________
risk/condition.
a) Internal
b) External
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
57. The committees of the board involve_________________
a) Supervisory committee
b) Risk management committee
c) Shareholders’ redressal committee
d) All of these
58. NBFCs stands for_________________
59. CSR stands for_________________
60. Which of the following is the essential of accord of Basel II?
a) Capital adequacy
b) Risk based supervision
c) Market disclosure
d) All of the above
61. Which of the following are the objectives of Basel II ?
a) To promote adequate capitalization of banks
b) To ensure better risk management
c) To strengthen the stability of banking system
d) All of the above
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62. The ganguly committee is of the view that the draft minutes of the board meeting should
be forwarded to the director’s within______________ hours of meeting.
a) 56
b) 64
c) 48
d) 32
63. In which ethical principle of the business ethics are measured by rightness of an act and depend
little on the results of this act?
a) Teleological ethical system
b) Deontological ethical system
c) Hybrid theory
d) Individual freedom
64. One of the major ethical issue in advertising is the use of______________
a) True
b) False
65. Major social responsibilities of business involve a)
Optimum utilization of scarce national resources
b) Responsibility no to make losses
c) Improve quality of life
d) All of above
66. Government is thinking of making it mandatory for the companies to spend_________________% of
their net profits on CSR.
a) 2
b) 4
c) 6
d) 8
67. It is the responsibility of the firm towards its________________ to avoid any type of cartel
formation that a attempts to reap monopoly profits.
a) Shareholders
b) Customers
c) Employees
d) Management
68. Four important group that business are shareholders, employees, customers and_________________
a) Management
b) Board of director
c) Society
d) Stakeholder
69. NGO stands for_________________
70. Employees should get_________________ wages
a) Clear
b) Minimum
c) Maximum
d) Fair
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71. Objectives of environmental audit are__________
a) Verification of legislative a nd regulatory compliance
b) Assessment of internal policy and procedural conformamance
c) Establishment of current practice status
d) All of the above
72. Review of documents and records, Review of policies, interviews are comes under which stage a)
Pre-audit stage
b) Post-audit stage
c) Audit stage
d) None
73. Environment protection act was passed in________________ for the protection of environment.
a) 1988
b) 1999
c) 1986
d) 1990
74. The financial or non-financial support of an activity, used primarily to reach the given business goals
is_______
a) Media
b) finance
c) Both a &b
d) Sponsorship
75. A printed report giving news or information of interest to a special group.
a) Newsletter
b) Formal meeting
c) Mailing list
d) Media release
76. Media can be used to promote_______________ communication.
a) One way
b) Two way
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
77. Businesses arrange for______________ meetings with powerful stakeholders.
a) Information display
b) Public forum
c) Formal meeting
d) Informal meeting
78. MRTP stands for_________________
79. IRDA stands for_________________
80. It is said to be exist where there is a large number of procedures (firms) producing a same kind
of product.
a) Monopoly competition
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b) Monopolistic competition
c) Perfect competition
d) None of the above
81. Which of the following aspects of economic activity is not control by MRTP?
a) Restrictive on buying/selling
b) Unfair trade practices
c) Concentration of economic power
d) Restrictive trade practices
82. Price control is the restriction on maximum prices that is established and maintained by
the government.
a) True
b) False
83. Public policy is an attempt by the government to address a private issue.
a) True
b) False
84. The SEBI was established on________________
a) March 12, 1992
b) September 14, 1992
c) April 12, 1992
d) June 15, 1993
85. The seller of the security is________
a) Bear
b) Bull
c) Both a & b
d) None of the above
86. Insider trading can be defined as the sale or purchase of securities by persons who possess price
sensitive information about the company.
a) True
b) False
87. ___________ makes a commitment to get the underwritten issue subscribed either by other or by
them.
a) Utilitarianism
b) Underwriters
c) Insider trading
d) None of the above
88. The board of SEBI consists of_______________
a) 8
b) 7
c) 4
d) 6
89. SEBI has three functions rolled into one body quasi-legislative, quasi-judicial, and quasi-executive.
a) True
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b) False
90. SEBI is the regulator for the securities market in India.
a) True
b) False
91. AMFI stands for_________________.
92. Buying a commodity at a low price and instantly selling it for a higher price in another market is
known as________
a) Hedging
b) Speculating
c) Arbitrage
d) Shifting of risk
93. An over-the-counter market where buyers and sellers conduct foreign exchange transaction.
a) Commodity exchange
b) Foreign direct investment
c) FOREX
d) None of the above
94. Licensing grant a permit to aloe the use of something or to allow a business activity to take place.
a) True
b) False
95. Government often uses quotas to restrict export.
a) True
b) False
96. Private companies can enjoy the right to transfer shares.
a) True
b) False
97. India has 22 stock exchanges.
a) True
b) False
98. Foreign companies are those, which have been incorporated outside India and conduct business
in India.
a) True
b) False
99. Clause 49 has been prepared by the Reserve Bank of India.
a) True
b) False
100. Corporate Governance ensures easy access to capital.
a) True
b) False
S-2-200314

Examination Paper of Production Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Product Design & Development
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The concept of a contract book is detailed by
a. Wheelwright
b. Clark
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
2. BOM stands for Bill of Materials.(T/F)
3. Concept screening is based on a method developed by the late Stuart Pugh in the 1980s and is often
called ______________
4. _____________ is used when increased resolution will better differentiate among company concepts.
5. ________________are the first products produced by the entire production process.
6. The first commercial free-form fabrication system was introduced by 3D Systems.
a. 1984
b. 1986
c. 1964
d. 1948
7. Concepts are turned over the customer, client, or some other external entity for selection is called
a. Intuition
b. Pros and Cons
c. External decision
d. Decision materials
8. A Russian problem-solving methodology called TRIZ began to be disseminated in Europe and in the
United States in the
a. 1998
b. 1997
c. 1976
d. 1990
Examination Paper of Production Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
9. Functional elements of a Product Architecture are ___________& _____________
10. ______________ is a key determinant of the economic success of a product.
Part Two:
1. What is “Control Drawings”.
2. Write short note on “Resource Allocation”.
3. Write short note on “Product Variety”.
4. What is “Project Risk Plan”
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
New Product Development At Smart India Ltd.
Ajay Kumar, the Vice-President, (Sales) of a leading Delhi based bicycle manufacturer of the country
called SMART LTD., was wondering at the increase in the quantum of Traffic on roads during the last 10
years, while glancing outside his office window. But not much had changed in his company in th23e year
2001. His company‟s market share was dwindling since the last 10 years, though the profits and sales
were showing an increasing trend. The threat of cheap imports was also knocking at the doors. The
competitors were using marketing strategies to the hilt in order to get larger chunk of market share. The
things were not showing improving trend despite the continuous efforts by the company. SMART LTD.
was equally poised with RUSH LTD. in respect of market share just 10 years back. Now the ground
realties were very much adverse to SMART LTD.. While RUSH LTD. was having a market share of
about 45 per cent, SMART LTD. lagged behind with only about half i.e. 23 percent closely followed by
CLIMB LTD. with 20 per cent. The rapid erosion in the market share of SMART LTD. was of concern to
Ajay Kumar, who was trying to find out ways to stop the downfall. The problem of losing market share
had become more prominent keeping in view that the bicycle business was a volume led business to an
extent. To make the matters worse, the credit rating agency had downgraded the debt instrument issued by
the company in view of a possible feud between the family members of the promoter and the majority
share holders.
An important factor in the bicycle market, which had recently gained importance, was the increasing
demand for different types of bicycles among youth, particularly those of the sports variety. Unlike in the
END OF SECTION A
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past, improved technology had led to newer varieties of bicycle ranging from the very basic to the 21 gear
models. Such value added products also provide better profit margins. Also, some manufacturers had
started rolling out products provide better profit margins. Also, some manufacturers had started rolling
out products that were not strictly bicycles but had similar technological inputs. These included exercise
bicycles popularly found in the clubs and gymnasiums. At the plant level, the top post was that of the
Joint President and was held by one of the family members. Most of the decisions were subject to the gut
feel of the Joint President.
Though perceived as „a poor man‟s product‟, the scenario was changing of late. Earlier the product was
positioned using only one plank i.e., cost effective transport utility vehicle. Now the market was being
segmented multidimensionally by all the players. Age, benefit, income, occasions etc. were the added
criteria. SMART LTD. had come up with bikes for kids, city bikes, mountain bikes and classics. This
reflected the changing needs of buyers as well. CLIMB LTD. had segmented market on the basis of
usage, road bikes, mountain bikes and tandems. SMART LTD. had also jumped to the bandwagon
recently and had introduced bikes in ladies, kids, adventure and health segments. The trend was to
increasingly use the platform of health, fun, sports etc., to increase the penetration into the market. Once
the leader in the bicycle industry had 35 models in the market with about eight colour variants for each.
The competitor RUSH LTD. had about 45 models in the market with more colour variants.
The financial stakes of introducing of a new product in the bicycle industry ranged from Rs 45000 to
a couple of lakhs. The manufacturing process of bicycle was composed of many sub-assemblies. The
synergic use of these sub-assemblies helped in reaping economies of scale. To remain to the competition,
it was imperative to introduce innovative products that could meet the differentiated needs in a better
fashion. Ajay Kumar, the Vice President (Sales) had seen a bike in a foreign magazine and had sent the
picture of the same 6 months back to design and development department. The feasibility report was still
awaited from the design and development department. He appraised the Vice-President (Production)
regarding the issue but the things still had to be sorted out. Ghanshyam, the HOD(Sales Department) had
visited Taiwan and brought designs of four bicycles which could be manufactured by the company. But
his sales division suggested that those bikes would be out of reach for the poor, therefor, the idea could
not be taken up. He was very enthusiastic over a project to launch a new bike for fun loving people. After
detailed deliberations with the production and design development department for about 8 months, the
proposal was sent to the top management for approval. He was sad, as the file was pending for about 2
months with his boss. While Ajay Kumar was pondering over the issues, his colleague from the finance
department entered into the room and said, “I was watching a movie on HBO last night, I saw a very
different kind of bike in it. Did you view it?” Ajay Kumar replied in negative and wondered what could
be the right approach for product development. He was also concerned with the time involved in the
process of development of new products.
Ajay while passing by the market simply gazed at the bicycle showroom on his way and appreciated
the speed at which the competitors were able to come up with various colour variants. Recently, Ajay
Kumar also discussed with the Vice-President (Production) regarding the experimentation with some new
colours. The officer agreed with his new proposal and assured that the same shall be forwarded to the top
management for a final decision. Ajay kumar prepared himself to wait for a long time as his experience
curve suggested. One of the only solacing fact for Ajay Kumar was the success of the bike „football‟
which they launched on the eve of soccer world cup. The bike was an instant success. A friend of Ajay
Kumar, who worked with him till last year, called upon him. He remembered how enthusiastically he was
explaining his new challenging job. He was very happy about the confidence the management had put in
him. He was also being sent abroad on training by his new employers. The sales department had
subjectively come up with the multdimensional mapping of the three major players on two relevant
attributes.
The company planned to come up with a new campaign focusing upon the environment friendliness
of bicycle over motor bikes that use fossil fuels. The government also promised to aid the concern in this
effort. One of the main strengths of SMART LTD. was its undisputed leadership in the rural areas. The
company did not intend to lose it. His main rival was also closing in for the rural market. SMART LTD.
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had initiated a restructuring exercise in 1999-2000, whereby, three new wholly owned subsidiaries were
created, each being named after the respective cycle manufacturing locations, namely, SMART LTD.
(Delhi), SMART LTD. (Gujarat) and SMART LTD. (Andhra Pradesh). Although the originally stated
intention of setting up these subsidiaries was to treat them as profit centers, current developments indicate
the likelihood of distribution of assets and liabilities into these companies.
Ajay Kumar was quite confident of the quality of the bicycles manufactured as the steel used for the
sale was produced by one of its own unit. The firm had also bagged an international award for its quality
standards. The sales figures had gone up from 250 crores in the year 1995 to 350 crores in the year 1998.
The inflow of foreign exchange showed a steady increase from 100 to 120 during the same period.
SMART LTD. was exporting bikes to more than 35 countries.
Questions:
1. How new product development process be improved at SMART LTD?
2. What strategies should be used by SMART LTD. to increase its market share.
Caselet 2
Swastik Cycles Limited
Swastik Cycles Limited was a key manufacturer of a wide variety of cycles. Its products were available
almost all over the country and were also exported. It was the second largest bicycles selling organisation
followed by Star Cycles. The total turnover of the company was Rs 400 crores during the year 1999-2000
and its market share in the year 2000-2001 was about 24%, whereas Star Cycle had captured about 46%
of the total market in the same year, rest of the market was shared by all other brands. The company had
classified its entire products into.
1. Utility segment: popularly called as the standard cycles, widely used by milkmen, hawkers, and other
lower income group people.
2. Fancy cycles: multi coloured bicycles with modern features like gear changing, stylish handle, slim
frame etc., used by kids, teenagers and sportsmen.
3. Health segment: health maintaining products i.e., walker, cycle etc., for all age group had been put
under this categorys.
The company had its strength in the utility segment and was accepted as the market leader, whereas in
other segments, it had yet to prove itself. In other segments i.e., fancy cycle segment, health segment the
Star Cycle was far ahead. The company was striving to fight the stiff competition from domestic players.
It also anticipated the competition from Chinese players who were expected to enter the Indian market
with low cost products. On account of heavy import duties levied by the government in the budget of
2001-2002, the chances of their invading the domestic market were, however, substantially minimized.
Now, the company had confined itself to win over the domestic players in these segments. The major
issue for a company was that despite their presence in the fancy cycles the segment for last 10 years they
were not able to attract the target market and the sales were lagging behind. The immediate requirement
was to push the sales of these two segments.
The company had been trying to push sales through their dealers network all over the country which
was the only intermediatory between the company and the customers. In order to fresh the desired sales
company had the policy of offering monetary and non-monetary incentives in the form of rebates on
target lifting.
In addition to it, the company also offered incentives like foreign trips to Bangkok etc. and free passes
of mega events. The company also went for some other sales promotion activities the like point of
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purchase (POP), joint promotion schemes (JPS) with dealers, in which the dealers offered gifts on every
purchase to their customers and the cost incurred was born jointly by the company and the dealer
concerned. Cycle races organised by schools and educational institutes were other promotional measures
adopted by the company.
The company had invested marginally in advertising. They ran the show through print media and the
advertisement on the electronic media was very low. Decision making regarding promotional activities
was centralized with the corporate office, whereas, other decisions regarding sales, R&D and production
could be taken by the respective units. The field force comprising of sales executives and field officers
who were in constant touch with the dealers and the customers for getting their feedbacks regarding sales
promotion strategies, used to send the feedbacks to the corporate office for further processing and
decision making. This consumed time and little was left with the particular unit to decide.
The changing trends in the markets gave enough scope to make the bicycle popular amongst the elite
class in the form of health maintaining products, pollution free vehicles etc. Though the company was
making efforts to tap this newly emerging customer group by offering them health maintaining cycles,
stylish racing cycles, yet it was a hard task for the company because it had not made any strategy to reach
the customers directly to bring about awareness of the products. To improve its market share and
maximize sales, a lot was required to be done by the company to devise the marketing strategies if it was
to cope up with the changed market scenario and the strategies adopted by its competitors.
Questions:
1. Discuss key problem faced by Swastik Cycles?
2. Design an appropriate marketing strategy comprising of all the essentials to overcome this problem.
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Many product development teams separate the “looks like” prototype from the “works like”
prototype. They do this because integrating both function and from is difficult in the early phase of
development. What are the strengths and weaknesses of this approach? For what types of products
might this approach be dangerous?
2. The argument for the motorcycle architecture is that it allows for a lighter motorcycle than the more
modular alternative. What are the other advantages and disadvantages? Which approach is likely to
cost less to manufacture?
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION C
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Quantitative Techniques
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice questions & Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 0.5 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The value of 3n+4 – 6.3n+1 is
a. 27.3n+1
b. 21.3n-1
c. 21.3n+1
d. 27.3n-1
e. 21.3-n-1
2. The value of x which satisfies the question x/2-x/4=x-9 is
a. 12
b. 14
c. 16
d. 18
e. 20
3. The sum of 5ax-7by+cz and ax+2by-cz is
a. 6ax+5by
b. 6ax-5by
c. 6ax+5by-2cz
d. 6ax-5by-cz
e. 6ax-5by+2cz.
4. The product of 3x-5 and 2x+7 is
a. 6×2-11x-35
b. 6×2-11x+35
c. 6×2+11x-35
d. 6×2 +10x-35
e. 6×2+11x+35
5. The 37th term in the series -2.8, 0, 2.8,…. Is
a. 98
b. 89
c. 87
d. 78
e. 68
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6. The sum of the series 14, 64, 114, … to 20 terms is
a. 7890
b. 8970
c. 9780
d. 10820
e. 10920
7. The last term in the series 2, 4, 8, … to 9 terms is
a. 612
b. 512
c. 412
d. 312
e. 212
8. If an unbiased coin is tossed 3 times then the probability that at least one head occurs is
a. 0.875
b. 0.5
c. 0.375
d. 0.125
e. 0.1.
9. Again in continuation with the above question the probability that 3 heads result is
a. 0.100
b. 0.125
c. 0.250
d. 0.500
e. 0.875
10. The line y=5-10x cuts the y axis at_________ and has slope________
a. (0,10), -5
b. (0,-10), 5
c. (0,5), -10
d. (0,-5), 10
e. (0,5), 10
11. If y=F(x) is the equation of a line then the slope at (5,2) is given by
a. F‟(2)
b. F‟(5)
c. F(2)
d. F(5)
e. None of the above
12. Slope of the line passing through the points (4,4) and (5,5) is
a. 1
b. 9
c. 1/9
d. 20
e. 1/20
13. An „Ogive‟ is
a. A graph of ungrouped data
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b. A graph of grouped data
c. A graph of cumulative frequencies
d. A graph of ranges of fractiles
e. A graph with rectangles as opposed to a line graph.
14. If p=3×4 + 9xy + y3 then ∂p/∂y is given by
a. 12×3+9x
b. 12×3+9x+3y2
c. 9x+3y2
d. 9y+3y3
e. 12×3+9y+3y2
15. For a function f(x), f‟(x)=0 at x=a then „a‟ is a point of minima if
a. F(a)<0 b. F(a)=0 c. F‟‟(a)=0 d. F‟‟(a)< 0 e. F‟‟(a)>0
16. The function 2×2 + 3x +2 has a
a. Maximum value at x = – 3/4
b. Minimum value at x = – 2
c. Maximum value at x = -3/2
d. Minimum value at x = -3/4
e. The equation has no maxima and minima.
17. The probability of getting exactly 3 heads in four tosses of a fair coin is
a. 1/2
b. 1/4
c. 1/8
d. 1/10
e. 1/16
18. In multiple regression, the number of normal equations will be
a. Two
b. Three
c. One
d. More than three
e. More than or equal to three
19. The index of industrial production is an example of
a. Price index
b. Value index
c. Quality index
d. Relative index
e. Industrial production index
20. As the sample size is increased, the standard error of the mean would
a. Increase
b. Decrease
c. Remain unchanged
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d. May or may not increase
e. The value of sample mean would be lot closer of population mean
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by „Infeasibility‟ of the solution?
2. Write about „Big – M‟ method for minimization.
3. Write about the „Classical Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) models.
4. Write a short note on „Interfering Float‟.
Section B: Practical Problems (40 marks)
 This section consists of Practical Problems.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Practical Problems carries 20 marks.
1. A car retailer thinks that a 40,000 mile claim for tire life by the manufacturer is too high. She
carefully records the mileage obtained from a sample of 64 such tires. The mean turns out to be
38,500 miles. The standard deviation of the life of all tires of this type has previously been
calculated by the manufacturer to be 7,600 miles. Assuming that the mileage is normally
distributed, determine the largest significance level at which we should accept the manufacturer‟s
mileage claim, that is, at which we would not conclude the mileage is significantly less than
40,000 miles.
2. Consider the following data:
Output Total Cost
(in lakhs of units) (in lakhs of rupees)
5 140
7 155
9 170
11 180
14 200
17 230
20 240
22 260
24 275
28 310
Identify the fixed and variable cost components using the least squares method.
END OF SECTION A
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Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. In a recent survey, senior company executives in five metros has ranked two former finance ministers
Mr. Manmohan Singh and Mr. P. Chindambaram as first and second and the present finance minister
Mr. Yashwant Sinha in third position as regarding their popularity.In this, an example of sampling
survey? Discuss about necessity of sampling and the different methods of sampling?
2. “Index numbers are an indispensible tool in day to day life. Comment. Also, explain with examples
how index numbers provide a summary measurement of movements of a large number of economic
variables. Is there a possibility that, their method of computation could give a distorted picture of
reality?
S-2-300813
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION C


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT IIBM EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

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Hospitality Management
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of True and False and Short Note Types Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
True and False:
1. ADA stands for Americans with Disabilities Act.
2. NOT stands for National Offices of Tourism.
3. Management contracts have been responsible for the hotel industry‟s rapid boom since the 1960s.
4. High-speed Internet service is free form of information technology that these businesses can utilize.
5. One of the most crucial IT decisions is choosing the right POS system.
6. Forecasting is the prediction of present outcomes.
7. The top independent restaurant in terms of sales is the Tavern on the Green in New York City, which opened in 1976.
8. A fine dining restaurant is one where a good selection of seat arranged is offered.
9. Terms to understand in B&I foodservices are contractors, self-operators, & Liaison personnel.
10. Every manager must function the as a leader, motivating and encouraging employees is called spokesperson role.
Part Two:
1. List the various types of Hotel operation Theories?
2. Discuss the different types of activities of front office in Hotel?
3. Write the Short note on Housekeeping?
4. What are the guidelines for security of cash?
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END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Airline Commission Caps
Travel agents have begun legal action and public campaigns to combat several airlines‟ decisions to lower commissions for writing tickets, and have warned of higher ticket costs if other airlines follow. Most U.S. airlines have lowered the commission rate on tickets for domestic flights to a $20 cap for a round-trip fare. International commissions also fell and vary from airline to airline.As consumers begin to balk at rising prices and Wall Street presses for continued earnings growth, airlines must cut costs by turning to their second largest expense, the $12 billion spent annually for costs such as travel agent commissions. It has become clear that airlines can do nothing about fuel prices management has any power over is the area of distinction expenses.American Express Corporate Services Agencies, which books mostly business travelers, warned that if other airlines follow suit, some travel agencies will go out of business. That would send more businesses to airlines‟ reservation agents, who do not offer the lowest available fares from all carries, or could result in travel agents passing costs along to consumers.The American Society of Travel Agents, which represent 24,000 agents, and The Association of Retail Travel Agents, a trade group that represents 4,000 travel agents, have announced they will seek U.S. congressional approval to allow small, “business-sized” travel agents to bargain collectively with the major airlines and to steer customers to “friendly” airlines when negotiating fails. The associations believe that the cut in commissions in less than three years is a slap in the face.After the introduction of the initial cap of $25 for one-way domestic tickets and $50 for round-trip tickets, many agents complained caps would eliminate jobs and reduce earnings. A class action lawsuit followed on behalf of 33,000 travel agents, alleging price fixing. Some travel agents also steered customers away from other airlines such as Delta in retaliation.In September 1996, American, Delta, Northwest, and United agreed to pay $72 million in cash to settle the lawsuit.
1. If you owned a travel agency, what would your reaction to the reduced commission cap be?
2. What options would you consider?
Caselet 2
Java Coffee House
Michelle Wong is manager of the Java Coffee House at a busy location on Union Street in San Francisco. Michelle says that there are several challenges in operating a busy coffeehouse, such as training staff to handle unusual circumstances. For example, one guest consumed a cup of coffee and ate two-thirds of a piece of cake and then said he didn‟t like the cake. Another problem is suppliers who quote good prices to get her business and then, two weeks later, raise the price of some of the items.Michelle says that young employees she has at the Java Coffee House are her greatest challenge of all. According to Michelle, there are four kinds of employees – lazy; good , but not responsible; those who steal; and great ones who are no trouble.
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What are some suggestions for training staff to handle unusual circumstances?
2. How do you ensure that suppliers are delivering the product at the price quote?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. What do you mean by Hotel Management? What are the functions of Hotel Management?
2. Define the term operational strategy? And also explain the Model framework for Hotel organizations?
3. What do you mean by Food Services? List the Different types of Food service?
END OF SECTION C
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Hospitality & Tourism Marketing
Section A: Objective Type (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Notes Type Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and Part Two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple forms:
1. In SMERF, S stands for_____________
a. Social
b. Service
c. Sale
d. None of the above
2. If the Question Mark businesses are successful then they become Stars.(T/F)
3. Customers can be considered under_____________
a. Micro environment forces
b. Macro environment forces
c. none
d. depending on the area of consideration any of the above
4. Demography is the study of________________
5. Generation X consist of the people born between__________
a. 1946 to 1964
b. 1965 to 1976
c. 1977 to 1994
d. None of the above
6. In „SMERF‟ M stands for____________
a. Money
b. Model
c. Military
d. Market
7. Aural dimensions of environment are volume and pitch.(T/F)
8. NAM stands for_____________
a. National Account Management
b. National Accounting Market
c. National Autonomous Market
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d. Both (a) & (b)
9. Fixed costs are also known as „Overheads‟.(T/F)
10. Lobbying is dealing with legislators and government officials to promote or defeat legislation and regulation.(T/F)
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by „Hospitality Marketing‟?
2. Explain the various types of Marketing in service Industries?
3. Write a short note on Hospitality Marketing Mix?
4. Describe the factors influencing the consumer Behaviour?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
International Travel Agency
The president of International Travel Agency was concerned about the performance of the sales force. It was felt that members of the sales force did not really utilize their sales opportunities, but instead though only about selling a ticket to a customer from point A to point B. The sales force did not seem to have an interest in maximizing sales and profits by aggressively selling the entire product mix. In total, the agency had a sales force of eight. Three members of the sales force were referred to as executive sales consultants. These people called on commercial accounts and were expected to spend more of their time outside the office. The remaining five persons were referred to as travel counselors and worked entirely within the agency. None of the travel counselors who worked within the agency were assigned a quota. The executive sales consultants, who worked outside the office, were assigned a sales quota. Failure to meet a quota would be discussed with the salesperson, but no other action was usually taken unless this failure continued for several months. If serious and persistent deficiencies existed, the salesperson could be subject to discharge.The agency provided nine to twelve familiarization (fam) trips for members of the sales force each year. This meant that each salesperson could experience at least one trip per year, as they were assigned on a rotating basis. These trips did not reduce time from the salesperson‟s guaranteed number of days of annual vacation. The purpose of a fam trip was to acquaint travel agents with destination areas and the services of airlines, hotels, restaurants, and so on. The president felt that the agency could maximize profits by selling more
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travel services to clients and that the sales force was concerned only about selling tickets. An analysis of the product mix of International Travel revealed that approximately 85 percent was accounted for by airline tickets. The remaining 15 percent consisted of allied travel services, including hotels, rental cars, and entertainment. Of these, the majority consisted of hotel reservations. Less than one percent was accounted for by the sale of traveler‟s checks. One of the members of management offered the analogy of a businessman entering a clothing store. If a customer purchases a suit, the salesclerk asks if the customer might need a new shirt or tie to go with the suit. Travel agents are no different. They write a ticket from Chicago to Hong Kong or London for a client and never bother to ask if the client needs hotel accommodations, rental cars, travelers checks, or other services that an agency handles. The president of International Travel had tried to encourage the sales force to sell other services but felt that they seemed uninterested in taking the time and effort required. The president believed that maximizing sales of the complete product mix would lead to maximum profits and that something must be done to encourage cross-selling.
1. What can be done to encourage the sales force to engage in more cross-selling?
2. Discuss what is needed in terms of sales incentives and sales controls to achieve the objectives of International Travel Agency.
Caselet 2
TANGLEWOOD PARK: VANTAGE GOLF TOURNAMENT
Tanglewood Park has a budget of $4.8 million per year and golf is the primary moneymaker for the park, but over the past four years, Tanglewood has steadily lost money on its golf greens. In 1994, golfers paid about $1 million to play on the championship course where the Vantage is held. However, the amount of maintenance needed to keep this course in top shape and the loss of revenue when the course is shut down for repairs have created an economic problem. The general public who pays county taxes has been restricted from the greens to ensure that the course will be in shape for the Vantage tournament. Revenue from the championship course was expected to be $428,000 less in 1997 than in 1994. “We‟re trying to product our investment,” said Rich Schmidt, finance officer for the park. The dilemma is that golfers who are viewed as “big-buck spenders” want to play where the pros play, said Francie Bray, director of marketing for the park. How much does the county get from these players and the thousands of visitors who attend the three-day tournament? Nobody knows! Officials with the Country Tourism and Development Authority don‟t know and neither do officials of the tournament, but most are from Forsyth and surrounding counties. So its doubtful that these people add much revenue to the county. They don‟t stay in hotels or make extra trips to the restaurant as a result of the tournament. Many observers feel that the only real spenders are the 500 people directly associated with the Vantage. That includes golfers, caddies, guest, and the media, said Richard Habeggar, tournament director. John Wise, general manager of the Adam‟s Mark Hotel in nearby Winston-Salem, said he expects some of the 615 rooms to be filled with tournament guests, but when asked how much the tournament helped, he said, “That‟s tough to say. If we didn‟t have the Vantage, we‟d attract business from other events.” An official from the Ramada Inn said that the 147 rooms for the tournament period were booked, but some had been sold to people attending weddings. Despite a budget of $3 million by R.J. Reynolds to sponsor the Vantage, the company started the 1996 tournament with a $250,000 deficit. Tournament officials have noticed a slump in ticket sales and cut expenditures by airing the event on the Golf Channel rather than ESPN, which broadcast the event for ten years. Pete Brunstetter said he wasn‟t certain of the future for the tournament but said that the county couldn‟t help to subsidize it. The lack of reliable statistics concerning the economic advantages of the tournament to the county and to the local visitor industry undoubtedly hurt. Elected officials responsible for the careful expenditure of tax money and professional managers of a county
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
public park must support their decisions. The absence of reliable data makes it nearly impossible to mount a defense the public will accept.
1. The county commissioners need information to make a decision on the golf tournament. Using the marketing research process, develop a research plan that will provide the commissioners with the information they need.
2. Explain why it is important on the economic contribution of social events, both before and after the event.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. What is the meaning of Tourism Marketing? How would you explain the role of Tourism organization in Tourism Marketing?
2. Identify a restaurant or hotel market segment in your community that you feel would be a good market segment to target. Explain the marketing mix you would put together to go after this market segment.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-300813

Examination Paper of Business Communication
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code-B-109 Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of International Business Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
International Business Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice and Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. What is the series consideration for strategy implementation?
a. Strategic orientation
b. Location
c. Dimensions
d. Both (a) & (b)
2. The major activity in global marketing is:
a. Pricing policies
b. Product lines
c. Market assessment
d. All of the above
3. The third „P‟ in the international marketing mix is:
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
4. The European Economic Community was established in____________
a. 1958
b. 1975
c. 1967
d. 1957
5. Environment Protection Act on______________
a. 1986
b. 1967
c. 1990
d. None of the above
6. People‟s attitude toward time depend on:
a. Language
b. Relationship
c. Culture
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
d. All of the above
7. Culture necessitates adaption of :
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
8. The legal term for brand is:
a. Symbol
b. Name
c. Trade mark
d. All of the above
9. FDI flows are often a reflection of rivalry among firms in____________
a. Global market
b. Indian market
c. International market
d. None of the above
10. ISO certification is:
a. Expensive process
b. Elaborate process
c. Evaluative Process
d. Both (a) & (b)
Part Two:
1. What do understand by „Inward-oriented Policies‟?
2. What is „Factor Endowments Theory‟?
3. Explain the term „Totalitarianism‟.
4. Write about „Persistent Dumping‟.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Examination Paper of International Business Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
THE EU’S LAGGING COMPETITIVENESS
In a report produced for the European Commission, published in November 1998, it was argued that
the EU lags behind the USA and Japan on most measures of international competitiveness. Gross
domestic product per capita, sometimes used as an indicator of international competitiveness at the
country level, was 33 per cent lower in the EU as a whole than in the USA and 13 per cent lower
than in Japan. The EU‟s poor record in creating employment was singled out for particular criticism.
As this appeared to apply across the board in most industrial sectors, it suggested that the EU‟s poor
performance related to the business environment in general and, in particular, to the inflexibility of
Europe‟s labour markets for goods and services. A shortage of risk capital for advanced
technological development and high cost and inefficiency of Europe‟s financial services were also
highlighted by the report. For one reason or another, European industries generally lag behind in
technology industries. If measured by the number of inventions patented in at least two countries, the
USA is well ahead of most European countries, as well as Japan. Despite these shortcomings, the
report‟s authors focus attention on flexible markets, market liberalisation, and the creation of a
competitive business environment rather than on targeted intervention by the EU or national
authorities.
Questions:
1. Is gross domestic product per capita a useful indicator of International competitiveness in the EU?
2. Is it fair to point the blame for the EU‟s poor international competitiveness at inflexible labour
markets, regulated goods and services markets, and a general lack of competition? What
alternative explanations might be suggested?
Caselet 2
PERU
Peru is located on the west coast of South America. It is the third largest nation of the continent (after
Brazil and Argentina), and covers almost 500,000 square miles (about 14 per cent of the size of the
United States). The land has enormous contrasts, with a desert (drier than the Sahara), the towering
snow-capped Andes mountains, sparkling grass-covered plateaus, and thick rain forests. Peru has
approximately 27 million people, of which about 20 per cent live in Lima, the capital. More Indians
(one half of the population) live in Peru than in any other country in the western hemisphere. The
ancestors of Peru‟s Indians were the famous Incas, who built a great empire. The rest of the
population is mixed and a small percentage is white. The economy depends heavily on agriculture,
fishing, mining, and services. GDP is approximately $115 billion and per capita income in recent
years has been around $4,300. In recent years the economy has gained some relative strength and
multinationals are now beginning to consider investing in the country. One of these potential
investors is a large New York based that is considering a $25 million loan to the owner of a Peruvian
fishing fleet. The owner wants to refurbish the fleet and add one more ship. During the 1970s, the
Peruvian government nationalised a number of industries and factories and began running them for
the profit of the state. In most cases, these state-run ventures became disasters. In the late 1970s, the
fishing fleet owner was given back his ships and are getting old and he needs an influx of capital to
make repairs and add new technology. As he explained it to the NEW YORK banker: “fishing is no
longer just un art. There is a great deal of technology involved. And to keep costs low and be
competitive on the world market , you have to have the latest equipment for both locating as well
as catching and then loading and unloading the fish.”Having reviewed the fleet owner‟ operation, the
large multinational bank believes that the loan is justified. The financial institution is concerned ,
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
however , that the Peruvian government might step in during the next couple of years and again
take over the business . If this were to happen, it might take an additional decade, for the loan to be
repaid. If the government were to allow the fleet owner to operate the fleet the way he has over the
last decade, the loan could be rapid within seven years. Right now, the bank is deciding on the
specific terms of the agreement. Once these have been worked out , either a loan officer will fly
down to lima and close the deal or the owner will be asked to come to NEW YORK for the signing.
Whichever approach is used, the bank realize that final adjustments in the agreement will have
to be made on the spot. Therefore, if the bank sends a representative to Lima, the individual will have
to the authority to commit the bank to specific terms. These final matters should be worked out within
the next ten days.
Questions:
1. What are some current issues Facing Peru? What is the climate for doing business in Peru today?
2. Would the bank be better off negotiating the loan in New York or in Lima? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Imagine that you are the director of a major international lending institution supported by funds
from member countries. What one area in newly industrialized and developing economics would
be your priority for receiving development aid? Do you suspect that any member country will be
politically opposed to aid in this area? Why or Why not?
2. The principle problem in analysing different forms of export financing is the distribution of risks
between the exporter and the importer. Analyse the following export financing instruments in this
respect:
(a) Letter of Credit
(b) Cash in advance
(c) Draft
(d) Consignment
(e) Open Account
END OF SECTION C


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Strategic Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. A plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal is:
a. Tactic
b. Strategy
c. Financial benefits
d. None of the above
2. It is important to develop mission statement for:
a. Allocating organizational resources
b. Provide useful criteria
c. Company creed
d. Customer orientation
3. The five forces model was developed by :
a. Airbus
b. Karin Larsson
c. Michael E.Porter
d. Boeing
4. How many elements are involve in developing in an organizational strategy:
a. Six
b. Two
c. Four
d. Nine
5. The three important steps in SWOT analysis are:
a. Identification, Conclusion, Translation
b. Opportunities, Threats, Strengths
c. People, Corporate cultures, Labour
d. Power, Role, Task
6. GE matrix consists of how many cells?
a. Nine cells
b. Six cells
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Eight cells
d. Three cells
7. Which of these is the type of Games:
a. Simultaneous Games
b. Sequential Games
c. Repeated Games
d. All of the above
8. SBU stands fora.
Simple Basic Unit
b. Strategic Basic Unit
c. Strategic Business Unit
d. Speed Business Unit
9. The BCG matrix is known as:
a. Growth share matrix
b. Directional policy matrix
c. GE nine-cell matrix
d. Space matrix
10. ______________ specifies sales revenues and selling distribution and marketing costs.
a. Financial budget
b. Sales budget
c. Operating budget
d. Expenses budget
Part Two:
Q. 1 What are the dimensions of Strategic management?
Q. 2 Critically analyze the concept of BCG Matrix.
Q. 3 What is SWOT analysis?
Q. 4 What are the characteristics of Short-term Objectives?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
National Competitive Advantage of IKEA Group, a Swedish company founded in 1943 with its
headquarters in Denmark, is a multinational operator of a chain of stores for home furnishing and
furniture. It is the world‟s largest retailer, which specializes, in stylish but inexpensive Scandinavian
designed furniture. At the end of 2005 the IKEA Group of Companies had a total of 175 stores in 31
countries. In addition there are 19 IKEA stores owned and run by franchisees, outside the IKEA store
around the world.
In Sweden, nature and a home both play a big part in people‟s life. In fact one of the best ways to describe
the Swedish home furnishing style is to describe nature-full of light and fresh air, yet restrained and
unpretentious.
To match up the artist Carl and Karin Larsson combined classical influences with warmer Swedish folk
styles .They created a model of Swedish home furnishing design that today enjoys world-wide renown. In
the 1950s the styles of modernism and functionalism developed at the same time as Sweden established a
society founded on social equality .The IKEA product range –The IKEA product range- modern but not
trendy, functional yet attractive, human-centered and child friendly – carries on these various Swedish
home furnishing traditions.
The IKEA Concept, like lots founder, was born in Samaland. This is a part of Southern Sweden where the
soil is thin and poor. The people are famous for working hard, living on small means and using their
heads to make the best possible use of the limited resources they have. This way of doing things is at the
heart of the IKEA approach to keeping prices low.
IKEA was founded when Sweden was fast becoming an example of the caring society, where rich and
poor alike were well looked after. This is also a theme that fits well with the IKEA vision. In order to give
the many people a better everyday life, IKEA asks the customer to work as a partner. The product range is
child-friendly and covers the need of the whole family, young and old. So together we can a better
everyday life for everyone.
In addition to working about around 1,800 different suppliers across the world, IKEA produces many of
its own products through sawmills and factories in the IKEA industrial group, Swedwood.
Swedwood also has a duty to transfer knowledge to other suppliers, for example by educating them in
issues such as efficiency, quality and environmental work.
Swedwood has 35 industrial units in 11 countries.
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Purchasing: IKEA has 42 Trading Service Offices (TSO‟s) in 33 countries. Proximity to their suppliers
is the key to rational, long term cooperation. That‟s why TSO co-workers visit suppliers regularly to
monitor production, test new ideas, negotiate prices and carry out quality audits and inspection.
Distribution: The route from supplier to customer must be as direct, cost- effective and environmentally
friendly as possible. Flat packs are important aspects of this work: eliminating wasted space means we
can transport and store goods more efficiently. Since efficient distribution plays a key role in the work of
creating the low price, goods routing and logistics are a focus for constant development.
The business Idea: The IKEA business idea is to offer a wide range of home furnishings with good design
and function at prices so low that as many people as possible will be able to afford them. And still have
many left! The company targets the customer who is looking for value and is willing to do a little bit of
work serving themselves, transporting the items home and assembling the furniture for a better price. The
typical IKEA customer is young low to middle income family.
The Competition Advantage: The competition advantage strategy of IKEA‟s product is reflected through
IKEA‟s success in the real industry. It can be attributed to its vast experience in the retail market, product
differentiation, and cost leadership.
IKEA Product Differentiation: A wide product range The IKEA product range is wide and versatile in
several ways. First, it‟s versatile in function. Because IKEA think customer, shouldn‟t have to run from
one small specialty shop to another to furnish their home, IKEA gather plants, living room furnishings,
toys , frying pans, whole kitchens i.e.; everything which in a functional way helps to build a home – in
one place , at IKEA stores.
Second, it‟s wide in style. The romantic at heart will find choices just as many as the minimalist at IKEA.
But There is only one thing IKEA don‟t have, and that is, the far- out or the over-decorated. They only
have what helps build a home that has room for good living.
Third, by being coordinated, the range is wide in function and style at the same time. No matter which
style you prefer, there‟s an armchair that goes with the bookcase that goes with the new extending table
that goes with the armchair. So their range is wide in a variety of ways.
Cost Leadership: A wide range with good form and function is only half the story. Affordability has a part
to play – the largest part. A wide range with good form and function is only half the story. Affordability
has a part to play- the largest part. And the joy of being able to own it without having to forsake
everything else. And the customers help, too, by choosing the furniture, getting it at the warehouse,
transporting it home and assembling it themselves , to keep the price low.
Questions
1. Do you think that IKEA has been successful to utilize Porter‟s Five force analysis? Give
reasons.
2. Where do you think can IKEA improve?
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
For ITC Ltd., 2007-2008 continued to be year of quiet growth. Just more launches in its relatively new
segment of non-cigarettes fast moving consumer goods, and solid growth. As in the past few years, ITC‟s
non-cigarettes businesses continued to grow at a scorching pace, accounting for a bigger share of overall
revenues. “The non-cigarette portfolio grew by 37.6% during 2006-2007 and accounted during that year
for 52.3% of the company‟s net turnover.” An ITC spokesman said. In fact, over the first three quarters of
2007-08, ITC‟s non-cigarette FMCG businesses have grown by 48% on the same period last year,
“Indicating that its plans for increasing market share and standing are succeeding.”
The branded packaged foods business continued to expand rapidly, with the focus on snacks range Bingo.
The biscuit category continued its growth momentum with the „Sun feast‟ range of biscuits launching
„Coconut‟ and „Nice‟ variants and the addition of „ Sunfeast BenneVita Flaxseed‟ biscuits. Aashirwad atta
and kitchen ingredients retained their top slots at the national level, with the spices category adding an
organic range. In the confectionery category which grew by 38% in the third quarter, ITC cited AC
Nielsen data it claims market leader status in throat lozenges. Instant mixes and pasta powdered the sales
of its ready to eat foods under the kitchens of India and Aashirwad brands.
In Lifestyle apparel, ITC launched Miss Players fashion wear for young women to compliment its range
for men.
Overall, the biscuit category grew by 58% during the last quarter, ready to eat foods under the kitchens of
India and Aashirwad brands by 63% and the lifestyle business by 26%.
For the Industry, the most significant initiative to watch the ITC foray into premium personal care
products with its Fiama Di Wills range of shampoos , conditioners, shower gels, and soaps. In the popular
segment, ITC has launched a range of soaps and shampoos under the brand name Superia.
Ravi Naware, Chief executive of ITC‟s food business was quoted recently as saying that the business will
make a positive contribution to ITC‟s bottom line in the next two to three years.
In hotels, ITC‟s Fortune Park brand was making the news during the year, with a rapid rollout of first
class business hotels.
In the agri-business segment, the e-choupal network is trying out a pilot in retailing fresh fruits and
vegetables. The e-choupals have already specialized in feeding ITC high quality wheat and potato, among
other commodities grown by farmers with help from e-choupal.
Questions:
Q1. Do you think the progress of ITC Ltd. is realistic?
Q2. After analyzing the above case, do you think every company should aim at cost leadership with high
quality product?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Strategic Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Q.1. What are the basic principles of Organizational structure? What are the different types of
Organizational structures?
Q.2. What do you understand by SBU? Explain various models of business level strategies
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Business Communication
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code-B-109 Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Financial Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Financial Management
Subject Code-B-103
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choices:
1. The approach focused mainly on the financial problems of corporate enterprise.
a. Ignored non-corporate enterprise
b. Ignored working capital financing
c. External approach
d. Ignored routine problems
2. These are those shares, which can be redeemed or repaid to the holders after a lapse of the
stipulated period.
a. Cumulative preference shares
b. Non-cumulative preference shares
c. Redeemable preference shares
d. Perpetual shares
3. This type of risk arises from changes in environmental regulations, zoning requirements, fees,
licenses and most frequently taxes.
a. Political risk
b. Domestic risk
c. International risk
d. Industry risk
4. It is the cost of capital that is expected to raise funds to finance a capital budget or investment
proposal.
a. Future cost
b. Specific cost
c. Spot cost
d. Book cost
5. This concept is helpful in formulating a sound & economical capital structure for a firm.
a. Financial performance appraisal
b. Investment evaluation
c. Designing optimal corporate capital structure
d. None of the above
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. It is the minimum required rate of return needed to justify the use of capital.
a. From investors
b. Firms point
c. Capital expenditure point
d. Cost of capital
7. It arises when there is a conflict of interest among owners, debenture holders and the
management.
a. Seasonal variation
b. Degree of competition
c. Industry life cycle
d. Agency costs
8. Some guidelines on shares & debentures issued by the government that are very important for the
constitution of the capital structure are:
a. Legal requirement
b. Purpose of finance
c. Period of finance
d. Requirement of investors
9. It is that portion of an investments total risk that results from change in the financial integrity of
the investment.
a. Bull- bear market risk
b. Default risk
c. International risk
d. Liquidity risk
10. _____________ measure the systematic risk of a security that cannot be avoided through
diversification.
a. Beta
b. Gamma
c. Probability distribution
d. Alpha
Part Two:
1. What do you understand by wealth maximization?
2. Discuss the concept of factoring.
3. Define Annuity.
4. What is the Difference between NPV and IRR?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Case lets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Financial Management
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 This section consists of Case lets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Case let carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Case1: Credit Decision – Agarwal Case
On August 30, 2006, Agarwal Cast Company Inc., applied for a $200,000 loan from the main office of
the National bank of New York. The application was forwarded to the bank’s commercial loan
department. Gupta, the President and Principal Stockholder of Agarwal cast, applied for the loan in
person. He told the loan officer that he had been in business since February 1976, but that he had
considerable prior experience in flooring and carpets since he had worked as an individual contractor for
the past 20 year. Most of this time, he had worked in Frankfert and Michigan. He finally decided to
“work for himself” and he formed the company with Berry Hook, a former co-worker. This information
seemed to be consistent with the Dun and Bradstreet report obtained by the bank According to Gupta, the
purpose of the loan was to assist him in carrying his receivables until they could be collected. He
explained that the flooring business required him to spend considerable cash to purchase materials but his
customers would not pay until the job was done. Since he was relatively new in the business, he did not
feel that he could compete if he had to require a sizeable deposit or payment in advance. Instead, he could
quote for higher profits, if he were willing to wait until completion of the job for payment. To show that
his operation was sound, he included a list of customers and projects with his loan application. He also
included a list of current receivables.
Gupta told the loan officer that he had monitored his firm’s financial status closely and that he had
financial reports prepared every six months. He said that the would send a copy to the bank. In addition,
he was willing to file a personal financial statement with the bank.
Question:
1. Prepare your recommendation on Agarwal Cast Company
Caselet 2
This case has been framed in order to test the skills in evaluating a credit request and reaching a correct
decision. Perluence International is large manufacturer of petroleum and rubber-based products used in a
variety of commercial applications in the fields of transportation, electronics, and heavy manufacturing.
In the northwestern United States, many of the Perluence products are marketed by a wholly-owned
subsidiary, Bajaj Electronics Company. Operating from a headquarters and warehouse facility in San
Antonio, Strand Electronics has 950 employees and handles a volume of $85 million in sales annually.
About $6 million of the sales represents items manufactured by Perluence. Gupta is the credit manager at
Bajaj electronics. He supervises five employees who handle credit application and collections on 4,600
accounts. The accounts range in size from $120 to $85,000. The firm sells on varied terms, with 2/10, net
30 mostly. Sales fluctuate seasonally and the average collection period tends to run 40 days. Bad-debt
losses are less than 0.6 per cent of sales. Gupta is evaluating a credit application from Booth Plastics, Inc.,
a wholesale supply dealer serving the oil industry. The company was founded in 1977 by Neck A. Booth
and has grown steadily since that time. Bajaj Electronics is not selling any products to Booth Plastics and
had no previous contact with Neck Booth. Bajaj Electronics purchased goods from Perluence.
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International under the same terms and conditions as Perluence used when it sold to independent
customers. Although Bajaj Electronics generally followed Perluence in setting its prices, the subsidiary
operated independently and could adjust price levels to meet its own marketing strategies. The Perluence’s
cost-accounting department estimated a 24 per cent markup as the average for items sold to Pucca
Electronics. Bajaj Electronics, in turn, resold the items to yield a 17 per cent markup. It appeared that
these percentages would hold on any sales to Booth Plastics. Bajaj Electronics incurred out-of pocket
expenses that were not considered in calculating the 17 per cent markup on its items. For example, the
contact with Booth Plastics had been made by James, the salesman who handled the Glaveston area.
James would receive a 3 per cent commission on all sales made Booth Plastics, a commission that would
be paid whether or not the receivable was collected. James would, of course, be willing to assist in
collecting any accounts that he had sold. In addition to the sales commission, the company would incur
variable costs as a result of handling the merchandise for the new account. As a general guideline,
warehousing and other administrative variable costs would run 3 per cent sales. Gupta Holmstead
approached all credit decisions in basically the same manner. First of all, he considered the potential
profit from the account. James had estimated first-year sales to Booth Plastics of $65,000. Assuming that
Neck Booth took the, 3 per cent discount. Bajaj Electronics would realize a 17 per cent markup on these
sales since the average markup was calculated on the basis of the customer taking the discount. If Neck
Booth did not take the discount, the markup would be slightly higher, as would the cost of financing the
receivable for the additional period of time. In addition to the potential profit from the account, Gupta was
concerned about his company’s exposure. He knew that weak customers could become bad debts at any
time and therefore, required a vigorous collection effort whenever their accounts were overdue. His
department probably spent three times as much money and effort managing a marginal account as
compared to a strong account. He also figured that overdue and uncollected funds had to be financed by
Bajaj Electronics at a rate of 18 per cent. All in all, slow – paying or marginal accounts were very costly
to Bajaj Electronics. With these considerations in mind, Gupta began to review the credit application for
Booth Plastics.
Questions:
1. How would you judge the potential profit of Bajaj Electronics on the first year of sales to Booth
Plastics and give your views to increase the profit?
2. Suggestion regarding Credit limit. Should it be approved or not, what should be the amount of
credit limit that electronics give to Booth Plastics.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
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1. Define Capital Structure. Discuss the important factors that should be considered while
determining Capital Structure.
2. What is the concept of working capital? Discuss the dangers of inadequate as well as excessive
working capital.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Marketing Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper
MM.100
Subject Code- B104 Marketing Management Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.
Part One Multiple Choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes& behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as: a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
d. Brand image
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6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Define Marketing Mix.
2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.
3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.
4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
Caselet 1 Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail. Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally, common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in 1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models. Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase, walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of
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Indian shoppers still prefer to pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over. Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families, kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The in-house wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations, though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point). Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With 60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor) in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique manner) are being aired. The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text – or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital. Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
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Caselet 2 The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children. Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in 70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eye-popping 64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adult-oriented material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of 1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999 with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals, and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web, and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2 finitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an all-round entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment. However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube would not run
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product, as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2, Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available. Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube. Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have high-speed access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional $39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299. Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001 the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season, 6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to $199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent. The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in 2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts). Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just 4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”. Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as email?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 
 Each question carries 15 marks. 
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words). 

1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product life cycle concept.
2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper
Production and Operations Management MM.100
Subject Code-B107 Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choice & Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part two questions carry 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. Production and Operations Management concerns itself with the conversion of:
a. Outputs in to inputs
b. Inputs in to outputs
c. Outputs in to outputs
d. None of the above
2. Continuous Production is
a. The last operation to the finished product
b. The first operation to the finished product
c. The mid operation to the finished product
d. None of the above
3. Independent demand is
a. Demand that is controlled by the company
b. Demand that is controlled by the customer
c. Demand that is not controlled by the company
d. All of the above
4. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has been defined as a
a. Complete Enterprise wide business solution
b. Complete Enterprise narrow business solution
c. a & b
d. None of the above
5. CAD stands for
a. Computer Architecture Design
b. Computer Aided Design
c. Computer Aided Drafting
d. All of the above
6. Delphi method is the most widely used and accurate method of
a. Demand forecasts
b. Exponential forecasts
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
c. Technological forecasts
d. All of the above
7. JIT/Kanban systems help eliminate __________
a. Increase the number of products
b. Increase the amount of raw materials
c. Increase the amount of energy
d. All of the above
8. PPSCS stands for
a. Project Planning Scheduling & Control System
b. Project Planning Sequencing & Control System
c. Production Planning Scheduling & Control System
d. None of the above
9. Process layout is also known as.
a. Group layout
b. Line layout
c. Product layout
d. Functional layout
10. Time study is a ______ technique for recording the times and rate of working
a. Standard times
b. Work measurement
c. Allowances
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define Job Shop Production.
2. What do you understand by „Quality Control‟?
3. What do you mean by materiel handling?
4. Define ABC analysis.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 1
Company Background
The Bronson Insurance Group was originally founded in 1900 in Auxvasse, Missouri, by James Bronson.
The Bronson Group owns a variety of companies that underwrite personal and commercial insurance
policies. Annual sales of the Bronson Group are $100 million. In recent years, the company has suffered
operating losses. In 1990, the company was heavily invested in computer hardware and software. One of
the problems the Bronson Group faced (as well as many insurance companies) was a conflict between
established manual procedures and the relatively recent (within the past 20 years) introduction of
computer equipment. This conflict was illustrated by the fact that much information was captured on
computer but paper files were still kept for practical and legal reasons.
File Clerks
The file department employed 20 file clerks who pulled files from stacks, refilled used files, and delivered
files to various departments including commercial lines, personal lines, and claims. Once a file clerk
received the file. Clerks delivered files to underwriters on an hourly basis throughout the day. The average
file clerk was paid $8,300 per year. One special file clerk was used full time to search for requested files
that another file clerk had not been able to find in the expected place. It was estimated that 40 percent of
the requested files were these “no hit” files requiring a search. Often these “no hit” files were eventually
found stacked in the requester‟s office. The primary “customers” of the file clerks were underwriters and
claims attorneys.
Underwriting
Company management and operations analysts were consistently told that the greatest problem in the
company was the inability of file clerks to supply files in a speedy fashion. The entire company from top to
bottom viewed the productivity and effectiveness of the department as unacceptable. An underwriter used
20-50 files per day. Because of their distrust of the files department, underwriters tended to hoard often
used files. A count by operations analysts found that each underwriter kept from 100-200 files in his or her
office at any one time. An underwriter would request a file by computer and work on other business until
the file was received. Benson employed 25 underwriters.
Management Information System
Upper management was deeply concerned about this problem. The MIS department had suggested using
video disks as a possible solution. A video disk system was found that would be sufficient for the
companies needs at a cost of about $12 million. It was estimated that the system would take two years to
install and make compatible with existing information systems. Another, less attractive was using
microfilm. A microfilm system would require underwriters to go to a single keyboard to request paper
copies of files. The cost of a microfilm system was $5 million.
Questions:
1. What do you recommend? Should the company implement one of the new technologies, if yes,
why?
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
2. An operations analyst suggested that company employees shared a “dump on the clerks”
mentality. Explain.
Caselet 2
Harrison T. Wenk III is 43, married, and has two children, ages 10 and 14. He has a master‟s degree
in education and teachers junior high school music in a small town in Ohio. Harrison‟s father passed
away two months ago, leaving his only child an unusual business opportunity. According to his
father‟s will, Harrison has 12 months to become active in the family food-catering business, Kare-
Full Katering, Inc., or it will be sold to two key employees for a reasonable and fair price. If Harrison
becomes involved, the two employees have the option to purchase a significant, but less than
majority, interest in the firm. Harrison‟s only involvement with this business, which his grandfather
established, was as an hourly employee during high school and college summers. He is confident that
he could learn and perhaps enjoy the marketing side of the business, and that he could retain the longtime
head of accounting/finance. But he would never really enjoy day-to-day operations. In fact, he
doesn‟t understand what operations management really involves. In 1991 Kare-Full Katering, Inc. had
$3.75 million in sales in central Ohio. Net profit after taxes was $ 105,000, the eleventh consecutive
year of profitable operations and the seventeenth in the last 20 years. There are 210 employees in this
labor-intense business. Institutional contracts account for over 70 percent of sales and include partial
food services for three colleges, six commercial establishments) primarily manufacturing plants and
banks), two long -term care facilities, and five grade schools. Some customer location employs a
permanent operations manager; others are served from the main kitchens of Kare-Full Katering.
Harrison believes that if he becomes active in the business, one of the two key employees, the vice
president of operations, will leave the firm. Harrison has decided to complete the final two months of
this school year and then spend the summer around Kare-Full Katering – as well as institutions with
their own food services – to assess whether he wants to become involved in the business. He is
particularly interested in finding out as much as possible about operations. Harrison believes he owes
it to his wife and children to fairly evaluate this opportunity.
Questions:
1. Prepare a worksheet of operations activities that Harrison should inquire about this summer.
2. If you were Harrison, what would you do? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This Section Consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Examination Paper of Production and Operations Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
1. What do you mean by Tactical Planning? What are the mathematical approaches to aggregate
planning?
2. What is the concept of forecasting in operation? List the different types of forecasting methods.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

CONTACT;DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Global Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multi Choice & Short Note type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each & Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
1. All the ethnocentric orientations are collectively called______________
2. Which of the following comes under benefits of Global marketing?
a. Endurance
b. Sales Promotion
c. Diversification
d. All of the above
3. The Polycentric orientation is the opposite of ethnocentrism. (T/F)
4. NAFTA stands for____________
5. ______________refers to the ability of the product and the company from that of the competitors
a. Positioning
b. Differentiation
c. Customer value
d. None
6. CAT stands for _______________
7. Cave dwellers are______________
8. LIFO stands for life in fire option.(T/F)
9. Starbursts are _______________
10. _____________is an advantage over competitors gained by offering consumers greater value
Part Two:
1. What are the implications of tariffs in the Global Marketing?
2. Write a short note on “Diffusion Theory”.
3. Discuss the concept of competitive marketing strategies.
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
4. Discuss the importance of marketing mix.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
The competitive advantage of nations and the competitiveness of locations have become important
topics in economic policy. Competitiveness is productivity; competitiveness is what the world
economic forum defines as the set of institutions and policies that determine the level of
productivity. There is no single determinant of competitiveness, there‟s no single determinant of
productivity.
Things that matter for example are the macroeconomic stability of a country, the soundness of
institutions whether the judiciary for example is independent or favors particular sectors or
businesses, whether the government acts in efficient ways or in sectarian ways, other determinants of
competitiveness involve market efficiency, labour market flexibility, and financial market flexibility.
The whole growth competitiveness index that is the index that has been used over the least five or
six years by the world economic forum captures the three big concepts: macroeconomic stability,
government institutions and innovations.
1. What are the indicators of global competitiveness? Discuss the new tools to determine global
competitiveness.
Caselet 2
In this new millennium, few business houses can afford a turn a blind eye to global business
opportunities. According to the latest Mckinsey Global Survey, top global executives believe that the
growing number of consumers in emerging markets will be the most important trend for global
business during the next five years. On 15th April 1994, trade ministers of 123 countries signed the
final Act of the GATT Uruguay Round of negotiations at Marrakech, bringing the WTO into being
on 1st January 1995.
The object of the Act is the liberalization of world trade. By it member countries undertake to apply
fair trade rules covering commodities, services and intellectual property. It provides for the lowering
of tariffs on industrial goods and tropical products; the abolition of import duties on a variety of
items; the progressive abolition of quotas on garments and textiles; the gradual reduction of trade
distorting subsidies and import barriers, and agreements on intellectual property and trade in
services.
1. Discuss the provisions of world Trade Organization (WTO). What are implications of WTO,
agreements on international business?
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. By marketing in a foreign country must a firm automatically utilize geographic segmentation or
some other segmentation basis discuss.
2. Distinguish between direct and indirect selling channels. What are the advantages and
disadvantages of each?

Examination Paper of Business Communication
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code-B-109 Business Communication
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices and Short Notes type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one questions carry 1 mark each & Part Two questions carry 4 marks each.
Part one:
Multiple choice:
1. __________is an essential function of Business Organizations:
a. Information
b. Communication
c. Power
d. None of the above
2. Physiological Barriers of listening are:
a. Hearing impairment
b. Physical conditions
c. Prejudices
d. All of the above
3. Which presentation tend to make you speak more quickly than usual:
a. Electronic
b. Oral
c. Both „a‟ and „b‟
d. None of the above
4. What is the main function of Business Communication:
a. Sincerity
b. Positive language
c. Persuasion
d. Ethical standard
5. The responsibilities of the office manager in a firm that produces electronics spares is:
a. Everything in the office runs efficiently
b. Furniture and other equipment in the office is adequate
c. Processing all the incoming official mail and responding to some
d. All of the above
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Labov‟s Storytelling Model based on:
a. Communication through speech
b. Language learning
c. Group Discussions
d. None of the above
7. Diagonal Communication is basically the:
a. Communication across boundaries
b. Communication between the CEO and the managers
c. Communication through body language
d. Communication within a department
8. How to make Oral Communication Effective?
a. By Clarity
b. By Brevity
c. By Right words
d. All of the above
9. Direct Eye contact of more than 10 seconds can create:
a. Discomfort & Anxiety
b. Emotional relationship between listeners and speakers
c. Excitement
d. None of the above
10. Encoding means:
a. Transmission
b. Perception
c. Ideation
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Define 7C‟s of effective communication.
2. Explain „Space Language‟.
3. Differentiate between good listeners and bad listeners.
4. List the different types of business report.
5. Define „Kinesics‟.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Business Communication
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200
words).
Caselet 1
Mr. and Mrs. Sharma went to Woodlands Apparel to buy a shirt. Mr. Sharma did not read the
price tag on the piece selected by him. At the counter, while making the payment he asked for
the price. Rs. 950 was the answer.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Sharma, who was still shopping came back and joined her husband. She was
glad that he had selected a nice black shirt for himself. She pointed out that there was a 25%
discount on that item. The counter person nodded in agreement.
Mr. Sharma was thrilled to hear that “It means the price of this shirt is just Rs. 712. That‟s
fantastic”, said Mr. Sharma.
He decided to buy one more shirt in blue color.
In no time, he returned with the second shirt and asked them to be packed. When he received the
cash memo for payment, he was astonished to find that he had to pay Rs. 1,900 and Rs. 1,424.
Mr. Sharma could hardly reconcile himself to the fact that the counter person had quoted the
discounted price which was Rs. 950. The original price printed on the price tag was Rs. 1,266.
Questions
1. What should Mr. Sharma have done to avoid the misunderstanding?
2. Discuss the main features involved in this case.
Caselet 2
I don‟t want to speak to you. Connect me to your boss in the US,” hissed the American on the
phone. The young girl at a Bangalore call centre tried to be as polite as she could. At another call
centre, another day, another young girl had a Londoner unleashing himself on her, “Young lady,
do you know that because of you Indians we are losing jobs?”
The outsourcing backlash is getting ugly. Handling irate callers is the new brief for the young
men and women taking calls at these outsourced job centres. Supervisors tell them to be „cool‟.
Avinash Vashistha, managing partner of NEOIT, a leading US-based consultancy firm says,
“Companies involved in outsourcing both in the US and India are already getting a lot of hate
mail against outsourcing and it is hardly surprising that some people should behave like this on
the telephone.” Vashistha says Indian call centre‟s should train their operators how to handle
such calls. Indeed, the furor raised by the Western media over job losses because of outsourcing
Examination Paper of Business Communication
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
has made ordinary citizens there sensitive to the fact that their calls are being taken not from
their midst, but in countries such as India and the Philippines.
The angry outbursts the operators face border on the racist and sexist, says the manager of a call
centre in Hyderabad. But operators and senior executives of call centres refuse to go on record
for fear of kicking up a controversy that might result in their companies‟ losing clients overseas.
“It‟s happening often enough and so let‟s face it,” says a senior executive of a Gurgaon call
centre, adding, “This doesn‟t have any impact on business.”
Questions
1. Suppose you are working as an operator in a call centre in India and receiving calls
from Americans and Londoners. How would you handle such calls?
2. Do you agree with the view such abusive happenings on the telephone do not have any
impact on business?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250
words).
`
1. What do you by Communication Barriers? How and why do they occur? What can be
done to overcome the Barriers to Communication?
2. Define and explain the term Negotiation and also briefly explain the phases of
Negotiation.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of International Business Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
International Business Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple choice and Short Note type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries 1 mark each and Part Two carries 5 marks each.
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. What is the series consideration for strategy implementation?
a. Strategic orientation
b. Location
c. Dimensions
d. Both (a) & (b)
2. The major activity in global marketing is:
a. Pricing policies
b. Product lines
c. Market assessment
d. All of the above
3. The third „P‟ in the international marketing mix is:
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
4. The European Economic Community was established in____________
a. 1958
b. 1975
c. 1967
d. 1957
5. Environment Protection Act on______________
a. 1986
b. 1967
c. 1990
d. None of the above
6. People‟s attitude toward time depend on:
a. Language
b. Relationship
c. Culture
Examination Paper of International Business Management
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
d. All of the above
7. Culture necessitates adaption of :
a. Product
b. Price
c. Promotion
d. Place
8. The legal term for brand is:
a. Symbol
b. Name
c. Trade mark
d. All of the above
9. FDI flows are often a reflection of rivalry among firms in____________
a. Global market
b. Indian market
c. International market
d. None of the above
10. ISO certification is:
a. Expensive process
b. Elaborate process
c. Evaluative Process
d. Both (a) & (b)
Part Two:
1. What do understand by „Inward-oriented Policies‟?
2. What is „Factor Endowments Theory‟?
3. Explain the term „Totalitarianism‟.
4. Write about „Persistent Dumping‟.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
Caselet 1
Examination Paper of International Business Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
THE EU’S LAGGING COMPETITIVENESS
In a report produced for the European Commission, published in November 1998, it was argued that
the EU lags behind the USA and Japan on most measures of international competitiveness. Gross
domestic product per capita, sometimes used as an indicator of international competitiveness at the
country level, was 33 per cent lower in the EU as a whole than in the USA and 13 per cent lower
than in Japan. The EU‟s poor record in creating employment was singled out for particular criticism.
As this appeared to apply across the board in most industrial sectors, it suggested that the EU‟s poor
performance related to the business environment in general and, in particular, to the inflexibility of
Europe‟s labour markets for goods and services. A shortage of risk capital for advanced
technological development and high cost and inefficiency of Europe‟s financial services were also
highlighted by the report. For one reason or another, European industries generally lag behind in
technology industries. If measured by the number of inventions patented in at least two countries, the
USA is well ahead of most European countries, as well as Japan. Despite these shortcomings, the
report‟s authors focus attention on flexible markets, market liberalisation, and the creation of a
competitive business environment rather than on targeted intervention by the EU or national
authorities.
Questions:
1. Is gross domestic product per capita a useful indicator of International competitiveness in the EU?
2. Is it fair to point the blame for the EU‟s poor international competitiveness at inflexible labour
markets, regulated goods and services markets, and a general lack of competition? What
alternative explanations might be suggested?
Caselet 2
PERU
Peru is located on the west coast of South America. It is the third largest nation of the continent (after
Brazil and Argentina), and covers almost 500,000 square miles (about 14 per cent of the size of the
United States). The land has enormous contrasts, with a desert (drier than the Sahara), the towering
snow-capped Andes mountains, sparkling grass-covered plateaus, and thick rain forests. Peru has
approximately 27 million people, of which about 20 per cent live in Lima, the capital. More Indians
(one half of the population) live in Peru than in any other country in the western hemisphere. The
ancestors of Peru‟s Indians were the famous Incas, who built a great empire. The rest of the
population is mixed and a small percentage is white. The economy depends heavily on agriculture,
fishing, mining, and services. GDP is approximately $115 billion and per capita income in recent
years has been around $4,300. In recent years the economy has gained some relative strength and
multinationals are now beginning to consider investing in the country. One of these potential
investors is a large New York based that is considering a $25 million loan to the owner of a Peruvian
fishing fleet. The owner wants to refurbish the fleet and add one more ship. During the 1970s, the
Peruvian government nationalised a number of industries and factories and began running them for
the profit of the state. In most cases, these state-run ventures became disasters. In the late 1970s, the
fishing fleet owner was given back his ships and are getting old and he needs an influx of capital to
make repairs and add new technology. As he explained it to the NEW YORK banker: “fishing is no
longer just un art. There is a great deal of technology involved. And to keep costs low and be
competitive on the world market , you have to have the latest equipment for both locating as well
as catching and then loading and unloading the fish.”Having reviewed the fleet owner‟ operation, the
large multinational bank believes that the loan is justified. The financial institution is concerned ,
Examination Paper of International Business Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
however , that the Peruvian government might step in during the next couple of years and again
take over the business . If this were to happen, it might take an additional decade, for the loan to be
repaid. If the government were to allow the fleet owner to operate the fleet the way he has over the
last decade, the loan could be rapid within seven years. Right now, the bank is deciding on the
specific terms of the agreement. Once these have been worked out , either a loan officer will fly
down to lima and close the deal or the owner will be asked to come to NEW YORK for the signing.
Whichever approach is used, the bank realize that final adjustments in the agreement will have
to be made on the spot. Therefore, if the bank sends a representative to Lima, the individual will have
to the authority to commit the bank to specific terms. These final matters should be worked out within
the next ten days.
Questions:
1. What are some current issues Facing Peru? What is the climate for doing business in Peru today?
2. Would the bank be better off negotiating the loan in New York or in Lima? Why?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
1. Imagine that you are the director of a major international lending institution supported by funds
from member countries. What one area in newly industrialized and developing economics would
be your priority for receiving development aid? Do you suspect that any member country will be
politically opposed to aid in this area? Why or Why not?
2. The principle problem in analysing different forms of export financing is the distribution of risks
between the exporter and the importer. Analyse the following export financing instruments in this
respect:
(a) Letter of Credit
(b) Cash in advance
(c) Draft
(d) Consignment
(e) Open Account
END OF SECTION C


MBA FIRST SEMESTER IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

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Human Resource Management
Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of
those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the
position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Marketing Management
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Subject Code- B104 Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of
customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or
resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes&
behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as:
a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
d. Brand image
6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or
service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the
products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of
passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build
primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Define Marketing Mix.
2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.
3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.
4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company
that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories
under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona
employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly
announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.
Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally,
common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s
wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The
concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping
experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an
investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing
campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and
five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange
happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were
women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to
include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in
1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi
and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit
customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that
organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground
rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how
the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an
outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign
retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail
companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the
world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.
Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the
store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was
trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail
management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was
internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management
institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even
restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the
latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive
membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by
invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest
names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai
and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house
wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving
and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase,
walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch
and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to
pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over.
Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The
company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to
the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families,
kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry
the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The inhouse
wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to
work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop
lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable
designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and
Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations,
though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s
wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).
Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have
been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money
customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands
plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its
in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing
brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all
brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the
company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith
in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With
60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the
turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let
such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor)
in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the
shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole
experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique
manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text –
or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers
having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a
pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to
the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the
product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special
care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it
all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it
has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there
was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to
stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer
variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most
expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far
totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since
its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
Caselet 2
The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a
crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different
companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of
computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega
surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per
cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children.
Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit
system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software
developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible
games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the
Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep
benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in
70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside
developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too
featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per
cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eyepopping
64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were
between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adultoriented
material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company
exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the
number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of
the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of
1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine
that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring
their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999
with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales
were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four
months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals,
and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end
of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its
momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the
functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser
were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web,
and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these
features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not
the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo
followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and
Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts
applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than
CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2
definitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is
able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an
enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to
gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy
access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability
to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an allround
entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment.
However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly
after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending
release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube
would not run on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would
be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the
company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want
to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers
and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its
extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario
Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video
game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their
handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to
ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they
were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product,
as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million
PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make
the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only
Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product
development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In
November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made
its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions
that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2,
Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This
open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option
of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the
advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of
the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready
when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available.
Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube.
Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an
Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network
on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches
and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have highspeed
access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of
households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open
network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees
charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional
$39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a
Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own
service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the
introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299.
Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less
than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video
game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season,
6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million
Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when
Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to
$199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the
GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units
worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony
had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven
years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It
had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent
share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent.
The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast
comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in
2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware
components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more
than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for
PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles
have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the
consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit
margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed
by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts).
Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more
intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and
Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely
on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for
exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just
4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal
bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For
one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to
play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to
receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are
intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make
available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and
technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three
companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”.
Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as
email?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product
life cycle concept.
2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613

Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
SubjectCode-B105 Organizational Behaviour
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and short notes type questions
 Answer all the questions.
 Part one carries 1 mark each and part two carries 5 marks each.
Part A:-
Multiple Choices:-
1. Which of the following is not comes under Maslow‟s needs theory?
1. Social needs
2. Affiliation needs
3. Physiological needs
4. Specification needs
2. Collegial model is an extension of:
a. Supportive model
b. Autocratic model
c. Custodial model
d. None of the above
3. Sigmund Freud‟s theory on personality is:
a. Related with moral values
b. Related with sexual values
c. Related with social values
d. Related with parental values
4. A person who moves fast, talk rapidly, usually impatient, measures success by quantity is a person
of:
a. Class A personality type
b. Class B personality type
c. Class C personality type
d. Class AB personality type
5. According to Maslow‟s need hierarchy theory esteem need comes at__________ position from
bottom:
a. 2nd
b. 3rd
c. 4th
d. 5th
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Informal communication is also called:
a. Grapevine
b. Red vine
c. Adams communication
d. Dead communication
7. Needs related to hunger, thirst, sleep etc. are considered as:
a. Safety needs
b. Physiological needs
c. Social needs
d. Self actualization needs
8. Horizontal expansion of a job that involves the addition of tasks at same level of skills:
a. Job enrichment
b. Job rotation
c. Job enlargement
d. Management by objectives
9. Path goal theory of leadership is developed by:
a. Robert R. Blake
b. Charles Bird
c. Fred fielder
d. Robert House
10. Potential or ability to influence others in a delivered direction is called:
a. Politics
b. Power
c. Motivation
d. Leadership
Part B:-
1. Define Bureaucracy.
2. State the concept of „Span of Control‟.
3. Wright a short note on classical conditioning learning theory of Ivan Pavlov.
4. What are the various stages of group development?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
M/s. ABC Ltd is a medium-sized engineering company producing a large-range of product lines
according to customer requirements. It has earned a good reputation as a quick and reliable supplier to
its customers because of which its volume of business kept on increasing. However, over the past one
year, the Managing Director of the company has been receiving customer complaints due to delays in
dispatch of products and at times the company has to pay substantial penalty for not meeting the
schedule in time. The Managing Director convened an urgent meeting of various functional managers
to discuss the issue. The marketing manager questioned the arbitrary manner of giving priority to
products in manufacturing line, causing delays in wanted products and over-stocking of products
which are not required immediately. Production Control Manager complained that he does not have
adequate staff to plan and control the production function; and whatever little planning he does, is
generally overlooked by shop floor manager. Shop floor managers complained of unrealistic
planning, excessive machine breakdowns, power failure, and shortage of materials for scheduled
products because of which it is impossible to stick to the schedule. Maintenance manager says that he
does not get important spares required for equipment maintenance because of which he cannot repair
machines at a faster rate. Inventory control manager says that on one hand the company often accuses
him of carrying too much stock and on other hand people are grumbling over shortages. Fed up by
mutual mud-slinging, the Managing Director decided to appoint you, a bright management consultant
with training in business management to suggest ways and means to put his “house in order”.
Questions:-
1. What would you suggest to avoid delays in dispatch of products?
2. What action should be taken by various functional managers to meet the scheduled dates?
Caselet 2
Rajender Kumar was a production worker at competent Motors Limited (CML) which made
components and accessories for the automotive industry. He had worked at CML for almost seven
years as a welder, along with fifteen other men in the plant. All had received training in welding both
on the job and through company sponsored external programmes. They had friendly relations and got
along very well with one another. They played Volleyball in the playground regularly before retiring
to the quarters allotted by the company. They work together in the company canteen, cutting Jokes on
each other and making fun of everyone who dared to step into their privacy during lunch hour. Most
of the fellows had been there for some length of time, except for two men who had joined the ranks
only two months back. Rajender was generally considered to be the leader of the group, so it was no
surprise that when the foreman of the new was transferred and his job was posted, Rajender applied
for the job and got it.
Examination Paper of Organizational Behaviour
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
There were only four other applicants for the job, two from mechanical section and two from outside,
when there was a formal announcement of the appointment on a Friday afternoon, everyone in the
group congratulated Rajender. They literally carried him on their shoulders, and bought him snacks
and celebrated. On Monday morning, Rajender joined duty as Foreman. It was company practice for
all foremen to wear blue jacket and a white shirt. Each man‟s coat had his name badge sewn onto the
left side pocket. The company had given two pairs to Rajender. He was proud to wear the coat to
work on Monday. People who saw him from a distance went up to him and admired the new blue
coat. There was a lot of kidding around calling Rajender as „Hero‟, „Raja Babu‟ and „Officer‟ etc.
One of the guys went back to his locker and returned with a long brush and acted as though he were
removing dust particles on the new coat. After about five minutes of horseplay, all the men went back
to work. Rajender went to his office to familiarize himself with the new job and environment. At
noon, all the men broke for Lunch and went to the canteen to eat and take a break as usual. Rajender
was busy when they left but followed after them a few minutes later. He bought the food coupon,
took the snacks and tea and turned to face the open canteen. On the left-side corner of the room was
his old work group; on the right-hand side of the canteen sat the other entire foreman in the plant—all
in their smart blue coats.
At that point of time, silence descended on the canteen. Both groups looked at Rajender anxiously,
waiting to see which group he would choose to eat with.
Questions:
1. Whom do you think Rajender will eat with? Why?
2. If you were one of the other foremen, what could you do to make Rajinder‟s transition easier?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. What are Psychological games & why people play these games?
2. A good leader is not necessarily a good manager.” Discuss this statement & compare leadership
with management.
END OF SECTION C
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Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 1
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Principles and Practices of Management
Subject Code-B101
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiples choice and short notes type questions
 Part one carries 1 mark each & part two carries 5 marks each.
 Attempt all questions
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. A plan is a trap laid to capture the ________
a. Future
b. Past
c. Policy
d. Procedure
2. Which of the following is the function for employing suitable person for the enterprise?
a. Organizing
b. Staffing
c. Directing
d. Controlling
3. ___________ means “ group of activities & employees into departments”:
a. Orientation
b. Standardization
c. Process
d. Departmentation
4. This theory states that authority is the power that is accepted by others:
a. Acceptance theory
b. Competence theory
c. Formal authority theory
d. Informal authority theory
5. Which of the following means dispersal of decision-making power to the lower levels of the
organization?
a. Decentralization
b. Centralization
c. Dispersion
d. Delegation
6. This chart is the basic document of the organizational structure:
a. Functional chart
b. Posts chart
Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 2
c. Master chart
d. Departmental chart
7. Communication which flow from the superiors to subordinates with the help of scalar chain is
known as:
a. Informal communication
b. Downward communication
c. Upward communication
d. Oral communication
8. Needs for belongingness, friendship, love, affection, attention & social acceptance are comes
under___________
a. Physiological needs
b. Safety needs
c. Ego needs
d. Social needs
9. A management function which ensures “jobs to be filled with the right people, with the right
knowledge, skill & attitude” is comes under__________
a. Staffing defined
b. Job analysis
c. Manpower planning
d. Recruitment
10. It is a process that enables a person to sort out issues and reach to a decisions affecting their life:
a. Selection
b. Raining
c. Reward
d. Counseling
Part Two:-
1. What do you understand by Maslow‟s Theory of Motivation?
2. Define Management By Objective.
3. Differentiate between co- ordination and co-operation.
4. Write a short note on „Acceptance theory‟.
END OF SECTION A
Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 3
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
Caselet 1
Mr. Vincent, the Manager of a large supermarket, was taking a management course in the evening
programme at the local college. The Professor had given an interesting but disturbing lecture the
previous night on the various approaches to management. Vincent had always thought that
management involved just planning, organizing and controlling. Now this Professor was saying that
management could also be thought of as quantitative models, systems theory and analysis, and even
something called contingency relationships. Vincent had always considered himself a good manager,
and his record with the supermarket chain had proved it. He thought of himself, “I have never used
operations research models, thought of my store as an open system, or developed or utilized any
contingency relationship. By doing a little planning ahead, organizing the store, and making some
things got done, I have been a successful manager. That other stuff just does not make sense. All the
professor was trying to do was complicate things. I guess I will have to know it for the test, but I am
sticking with my old plan, organize and control approach to managing my store.”
Questions:
1. Critically analyze Mr. Vincent‟s reasoning.
2. If you were the professor and you knew what was going through Vincent‟s mind, what would you say
to Vincent?
Caselet 2
The Regional Administration Office of a company was hastily set up. Victor D‟Cuhna a young
executive was directly recruited to take charge of Data Processing Cell of this office. The data
processing was to help the administrative office in planning and monitoring. The officer cadre of the
administrative office was a mix of directly recruited officers and promote officers (promotion from
within the organization).
Females dominated the junior clerical cadre. This cadre was not formally trained. The administrative
office had decided to give these fresh recruits on-the-job training because when results were not upto
the expectations blame was brought on the Data Processing Cell. Victor D‟Cuhna realized that the
administrative office was heading for trouble. He knew that his task would not be easy and that he had
been selected because of his experience, background and abilities. He also realized that certain
functional aspects of the administrative office were not clearly understood by various functionaries,
and systems and procedures were blindly and randomly followed. Feedback was random, scanty and
controversial, and Data Processing Cell had to verify every item of feedback. Delays were inevitable.
D‟Cuhna sought the permission of senior management to conduct a seminar on communication and
feedback of which he was an expert. The permission was grudgingly given by the senior management.
Everyone appreciated the seminar. Following the first seminar, D‟Cuhna conducted a one week
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Principles and Practices of Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management 4
training course for the clerical cadre, especially for the junior, freshly recruited clerks. Amongst other
topics, D‟Cuhna laid emphasis on
Questions:
1. Diagnose the problem and enumerate the reasons for the failure of D‟Cuhna?
2. What could D‟Cuhna have done to avoid the situation in which he found himself?
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
1. What are the common drawbacks in classical and Neo classical theories of management?
2. What is Training? Explain the different methods of training.
S-2-250613
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
END OF SECTION C
END OF SECTION B


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Information Technology
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice & Short Note type questions 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 1 mark each & Part two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. It means data that have been processed in a form that is meaningful and useful to the user.
a. Data
b. Information
c. System
d. None of the above
2. BCR stands for____________
a. Bar code reader
b. Basic code reader
c. Business code reader
d. None of the above
3. Which of the following comes under output devices?
a. Printer
b. Speaker
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None
4. A trackball is a stationary device related to the_______
a. Keyboard
b. Joystick
c. Mouse
d. All of the above
5. ___________is a volatile memory and everything disappears if power goes off or is turned off abruptly in the middle of work.
a. RAM
b. ROM
c. CDROM
d. None of the above
6. IC stands for____________
a. Integrated Circuit
b. Information Circuit
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
c. Interrelated Circuit
d. None of the above
7. DSS stands for____________
a. Decision Support System
b. Direction Support System
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
8. How many characters uses the MICR system?
a. 15 characters
b. 18 characters
c. 24 characters
d. 14 characters
9. One Megabyte contains:
a. 1000 KB
b. 1000 Bytes
c. 1000 MB
d. None of the above
10. The smallest element of data is called_______
a. Byte
b. Bit
c. Giga byte
d. None of the above
Part Two:
1. Write a note on „Cache Memory‟.
2. List the different types of information systems.
3. Write a short note on „Value Chain Analysis‟
4. Discuss peer- to – peer model in distributed computing system.
END OF SECTIONA
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each caselet carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 
Caselet 1
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
It began as a trading site for nerds, the newly jobless, home-bound housewives, and bored retirees to sell subprime goods: collectibles and attic trash. But eBay (www.ebay.com) quickly grew into a teeming marketplace of 30 million, with its own laws and norms, such as a feedback system in which buyers and sellers rate each other on each transaction. When that wasn‟t quite enough, eBay formed its own police force to patrol the listings for fraud and kick out offenders. The company even has something akin to a bank: Its Paypal payment-processing unit allows buyers to make electronic payments to eBay sellers who can‟t afford a merchant credit card account. “eBay is creating a second, virtual economy,” says W. Brian Arthur, an economist at think tank Santa Fe Institute. “It‟s opening up a whole new medium of exchange.” eBay‟s powerful vortex is drawing diverse products and players into its profitable economy, driving its sellers into the heart of traditional retailing, a $2 trillion market. Among eBay‟s 12 million daily listings are products from giants such as Sears Roebuck, Home Depot, Walt Disney, and even IBM. More than a quarter of the offerings are listed at fixed prices. The result, says Bernard H. Tenenbaum, president of a retail buyout firm, is
“They„re coming right for the mainstream of the retail business.” So what started out as a pure consumer auction market-place is now also becoming a big time business-to-consumer and even business-to-business bazaar that is earning record profits for eBay‟s stockholders. And as the eBay economy expands, CEO Meg Whitman and her team may find that managing it could get a lot tougher, especially because eBay‟s millions of passionate and clamorous users demand a voice in all major decisions. This process is clear in one of eBay‟s most cherished institutions: the voice of the Customer program. Every couple of months, the executives of eBay bring in as many as a dozen sellers and buyers, especially its high selling “Power Sellers,” to ask them questions about how they work and what else eBay needs to do. And at least twice a week, it holds hour-long teleconferences to poll users on almost every new feature or policy, no matter how small. The result is that users feel like owners, and they take the initiative to expand the eBay economy – often beyond management‟s wildest dreams. Stung by an aerospace down-turn, for instance, machine-tool shop Reliable Tools Inc., tried listing a few items on eBay in late 1998. Some were huge, hulking chunks of metal, such as a $7,000 2,300-pound milling machine. Yet they sold like ice cream in August.
Since then, says Reliable‟s auction manager, Richard Smith, the company‟s eBay business has “turned into a monster.” Now the Irwindale (California) shop‟s $1 million in monthly eBay sales constitutes 75% of its overall business. Pioneers such as Reliable promoted eBay to set up an industrial products marketplace in January that‟s on track to top $500 million in gross sales this year.Then there is eBay Motors. When eBay manager Simon Rothman first recognized a market for cars on cars on eBay in early 1999, he quickly realized that such high-ticket items would require a different strategy than simply opening a new category. To jump-start its supply of cars and customers, eBay immediately bought a collector-car auction company, Kruse International, for $150 million in stock, and later did a deal to include listings from online classifieds site, AutoTrader.com. Rothman also arranged insurance and warranty plans, an escrow service, and shipping and inspection services.This approach worked wonder. Sales of cars and car parts, at a $5 billion-plus annual clip, are eBay’s single largest market. That has catapulted eBay in front of No. 1 U.S. auto dealer AutoNation in number of used cars sold. About half of the sellers are brick-and-mortar dealers who now have a much larger audience than their local area. “eBay is by far one of my better sources for buyers,” says Bradley Bonifacius, Internet sales director at Dean Stallings Ford in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. And for now, the big corporations, which still account for under 5 percent of eBay‟s gross sales, seem to be bringing in more customers then they steal. Motorola Inc., for example, helped kick off a new wholesale business for eBay last year, selling excess and returned cell phones in large lots. Thanks to the initiative of established companies such as Motorola, eBay‟s wholesale business jumped ninefold, to $23 million, in the first quarter.As businesses on eBay grow larger, they spur the creation of even more businesses. A new army of merchants, for example, is making a business out of selling on eBay for other people. From almost none a couple of years ago, these so called Trading Assistants now number nearly 23,000. This kind of organic growth makes it
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
exceedingly though to predict how far the eBay economy can go. Whitman professes not to know.
“We don‟t actually control this,” she admits. “We are not building this company by ourselves. We have a unique partner – million of people.”
Questions:
1. Why has eBay become such a successful and diverse online marketplace? Visit the eBay website to help you answer, and check out their many trading categories, specialty sites, international sites, and other features.
2. Why do you think eBay has become the largest online/offline seller of used cars, and the largest online seller of certain other products, like computers and photographic equipment?
Caselet 2
It‟s no secret that somewhere in a back room in the typical Fortune 500 company, there‟s a team of analytical wizards running sophisticated data mining queries that mine for gems such as data about about the company‟s best customers – those top 20 percent of clients that produce 80 percent of the company‟s profits. These jewels can be a business‟s most valuable intellectual property, which makes them very valuable to competitors. What‟s to prevent that data set from walking out the door or falling into the wrong hands? Sometimes, not much. Many companies lack the internal controls to prevent that information from leaking. The problem is that such data is as hard to protect as it is to find. Owens & Minor Inc. (www.ownes-minor.com), a $4 billion medical supplies distributor, counts some of the nation‟s largest health care organizations among its customers. In late 1996, it started mining data internally using business intelligence software from Business Objects SA. “From the beginning, we were aware of security issues around this strategic information about our operations,” says Don Stoller, senior director of information systems at Owens & Minor. “For example, a sales executive in Dallas should only have access to analyses from his region.” It is always possible that someone who has legitimate access will abuse that trust, but companies can minimize that potential by strictly limiting access to only those who need it. thus, Owens & Minor uses role-level security functions that clearly define who has access to which data. “This meant we had to build a separate security table in our Oracle database,” says Stoller. A few years later, when the company wanted to open its systems to suppliers and customers, security became even more important. In 1998, Owens & Minor moved quickly to take advantage of Web-intelligence software from Business Objects that‟s designed to Web-enable business intelligence systems. The result was Wisdom, an extranet Web portal that lets Owens & Minor‟s suppliers and customers access their own transactional data and generate sophisticated analyses and reports from it.“It business-to-business transactions, security is key,” says Stoller. “We had to make absolutely sure that Jhonson & Jhonson, for example, could not see any 3M‟s information. This meant we had to set up specific customer and supplier security tables, and we had to maintain new, secured database views using the Oracle DBMS and Business Objects.”Wisdom was such a success that Owens & Minor decided to go into the intelligence business with the launch of wisdom2 in the spring of 2000. “We capture data out of a hospital‟s materials management system and load it into our data warehouse,” Stoller explains. A hospital can then make full use of its business-intelligence software to mine and analyze purchasing data. Owens & Minor receives a licensing and maintenance fee for the services.Layers of security and encryption require a considerable amount of overhead data for systems administration.
Both Stoller and Michael Rasmussen, an analyst at Giga Information Group, say that‟s the main reason security concerns about business intelligence are often swept under the carpet. The issues of authentication (identifying the user) and authorization (what things the user is allowed to do) must be addressed, usually across different applications, Rasmussen says, adding, “Systems
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
administration can be a real nightmare.”“We are going through some of this,” says David Merager, director of Web services and corporate applications at Vivendi Universal Games Inc.
(www.vugames.com). “Our business intelligence needs more security attention.” Business intelligence reports come from two systems: an Oracle-based for budgets on a Microsoft SQL Server database. The heart of the business intelligence system consists of Microsoft‟s OLAP application and software from Comshare Inc. that provides the Web-based front end for the analytics. “Our budget teams use these reports to do real-time analyses,” says Merager. Rodger Sayles, manager of data warehousing at Vivendi Universal, says one way to secure such a system is to assign roles to all users within the Microsoft application. Roles determine precisely what a user is allowed to see and do and are usually managed within a directory. If your computing architecture is amenable to a single, centralized directory that supports roles, this may be an attractive solution. “The problem is that once you have over 40 distinct roles, you run into performance issues, and we have identified about 70 user roles,” Sayles explains. He says there‟s way around this difficulty. “I think we are going to use a combination of Web portals and user roles. A user would sign on through a particular Web portal, which would effectively place the user in a role category. This reduces the overhead burden on the application,” says Sayles.
Questions:
1. Why have developments in IT helped to increase the value of the data resources of many companies?
2. How can companies use IT to meet the challenges of data resources security?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 
1. Explain distributed systems. What are the advantages and disadvantages of distributed systems?
2. What do you mean by database? List the different types of database model.
END OF SECTIONC
5
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper
MM.100
Database Management Systems
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 Marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short answer type questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Part one carries 2 marks each & Part Two carries 5 marks each. 
Part One:
Multiple choices:
1. A collection of related sets of data items along with necessary data/ information associated with it.
a. Data
b. Information
c. Process
d. Database
2. ___________connects computers which are very remotely placed.
a. Local Area Network
b. Wide Area Network
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None
3. A column in a table is called__________
a. Field
b. Record
c. Tuple
d. Link
4. DDL stands for ___________
a. Data Definition Language
b. Data Decision Language
c. Database Definition Language
d. None
5. SQL stands for ___________
a. Structured Query Language
b. Statement Query Language
c. Strict Query language
d. None
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
Part Two:
1. List the different types of DBMS.
2. Differentiate between „DBMS‟ and „RDBMS‟.
3. What do you mean by „Data Dictionary‟?
4. Differentiate between discretionary access control and mandatory access control.
END OF SECTION A
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each Caselet carries 20 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words). 
Caselet 1
Database management system is the complex software which is aimed at the management of the information stored in the database effectively. A high-quality management system helps organize, manipulate, transform, store, retrieve and create data professionally. It is important that the whole information kept in the database could be accessible, manageable, and easy for manipulation. A successful DBMS should possess a strict logical structure, which enables everyone to find the required data easily. The high-quality management system gives the opportunity for the user to change the required information without any harm to the whole application. Database management systems are extremely important today, because the humanity lives in the age of information and the whole information is kept in databases which require professional skilful management and flexibility.
Every organization, private and public, connected with business or not possesses the necessary information which is essential for its proper functioning. The information is supposed to be stored in security and only the employees of an organization can have access to it. The idea of a good database management system is to make the work of an organization easier, faster and of higher quality, because the easier and the faster the access to the data is, the faster the work will be. Moreover, if the information becomes out-of-date, the experts can modify it and introduce the necessary changes to make it valid.
1. What are the roles of a database in present scenario?
Caselet 2
The most dramatic advance of the past decade in software technology has been the development of database management systems (DBMS). There is little question about the potential of these systems for enhancing system support to managers and users while reducing design, structuring, and
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper of Information Technology
maintenance problems. Database systems also provide a way of improving information system flexibility by decoupling user-oriented data structures from physical storage methods. In spite of the vast potential of database management systems, the information systems community has not reacted with the total enthusiasm that might have been expected. Significant resistance has been encountered in some organizations, both from users, systems managers, and programming staff members. Although the literature on the features of database systems is substantial, there is little discussion of resistance problems encountered during the actual implementation and use of these systems in organizations. The purpose of this panel is to examine issues related to resistance toward DBMS in organizations. The panel members, each of whom is experienced in this area, will examine a number of organizational, technical, and application issues pertinent to the problem of resistance. The discussion will focus on why this resistance has occurred and how, if at all possible, it could have been avoided. Both behavioral and technical issues will be examined. This session should be of interest to both the practitioner and theorist alike. Database management systems are collectively the most significant software product advance in the last decade. There is little question about the potential of these systems for improving data management in organizations. Yet not all persons show a level of enthusiasm for these systems that their capabilities would merit. Users and systems persons alike have been known to resist acquisition and/or introduction of database management systems, sometimes strongly. In the discussion that follows, the problem of resistance as it applies to database management systems is introduced. The intent is to raise issues for research and investigation rather than to provide concrete answers to problems.
1. Discuss various anomalies in databases. How would you improve data management in organizations?
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions. 

 Answer all the questions. 

 Each question carries 15 marks. 

 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words). 


1. What do you understand by relational data model? Explain relational constraints and relational database schemas
2. What are the similarities and dissimilarities in the software development life cycle and database development life cycle?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-300813
8
IIBM Institute of Business Management


SYSTEM MANAGEMENT ISBM MBA EXAM ANSWER SHEETS PROVIDED

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System Management
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 1 Mark.
Part One:
Multiple choices
1. TCP stands for
a. Translate Control Protocol
b. Translate Cable Protocol
c. Transmission Control Program
d. Transmission Cable Program
2. Why we do not tap into a 10Base2 or 10BaseT cable in the same way as we tap with 10Base5 cable?
a. Because the cable is so thin.
b. Because the cable is so strong.
c. Because the cable is so thick.
d. Because the cable is so fat.
3. The Ethernet has its roots in an early packet radio network called
a. SMA
b. PARC
c. RWS
d. ALOHA
4. ___________is the second major class of Intra Domain Routing protocol.
a. Reliable Flooding
b. Link State
c. Route Calculation
d. Implementation
5. A Network that provides a constant band width for the complete duration of message transfer is a
a. Cell switched Network
b. Packet switched Network
c. Circuit switched Network
d. None of the above
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. A router :-
a. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links upto which the packet originated.
b. Determines on which outgoing link a packet is to be forwarded
c. Forwards a packet to the next free outgoing link
d. Forwards a packet to all outgoing links
7. What is the maximum speed of 10Base5 Ethernet Cable?
a. 100 Mbps
b. 500 Mbps
c. 50 Mbps
d. 10 Mbps
8. What is the maximum number of addressable stations on a 10BaseT Ethernet network?
a. 1024
b. 2500
c. 200
d. 512
9. A device that encodes analog voice into a digital ISDN Link is called
a. DSL
b. GSM
c. CODEC
d. AMPS
10. One of the small difference between the IBM Token Ring specifications and 802.5 is that
a. The former actually requires the use of MSAUs.
b. The former actually requires the use of MAC.
c. The former actually requires the use of TTRT.
d. None of the above
True & False
11. The sliding window protocol is the best known algorithm in computer networking.
12. One of the issues that faces a network designer is how to make this decision in a fair
manner.
13. Multicast addresses area used to send messages to subset of the hosts on an Ethernet.
14. 802.11 can support collision detection.
15. A Network Interface card operates at the Network Layer of the OSI model.
16. TCP port 5432 is the well known server part.
17. CPU is directly responsible for moving data between two networks.
18. Classless inter domain routing is a technique that addresses four scaling concerns in the
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Internet.
19. LAN is a connection oriented packet-switching technology.
20. Ethernet addresses are configured into the network adaptor by the manufacturer.
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions.( Answer should be in 5 lines)
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 5 marks.
1. What are the benefits of Packet Switching?
2. What is an Internetwork?
3. What protocols are there in the TCP/IP internet Layer?
4. What is difference between Virtual circuit Switching and Cell Switching?
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions.(word limit 100 words)
 Each Question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any 3 Questions.
1. Write a short note on Classless Inter Domain Routing (CIDR)?
2. What distinguish a computer network from other type of networks?
3. What are the Salient features of Global Internet?
4. Distinguish between Reverse-Path Multicast (RPM) and Protocol Independent Multicast?
END OF SECTION A
END OF SECTION C
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions.
 Each Question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. The Sliding window protocol is perhaps the best known algorithm in computer Network. Describe however is that it can be used to serve different roles.
2. Explain, how the Sliding Window Algorithm works in Direct Link Network?
END OF SECTION D
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Examination Paper MM.100
Operating Systems
Section A: Objective Type (20 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice Questions & Fill in the blanks / True & False.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question carries 1 mark.
Part One:
Multiple Choices:
1. The PCD data is allocated using a data Structure is called______________
a. Heap
b. Object Module
c. Tag
d. Head
2. Process is
a. Language of programme
b. Name of a computer software
c. An execution of programme
d. None of the above
3. Streaming tape can store record
a. Without a break irrespective of its size
b. With a break in size of record
c. Of size 10 kb
d. Both (a) & (c)
4. _______________is a policy decision based on the page reference information available in the page table.
a. Memory Allocation
b. Shared Pages
c. Page Replacement
d. Memory Mapping
5. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Multiprocessor computer system provides
a. Slow performance by serving several processes simultaneously
b. High performance by serving several processes simultaneously
c. High performance by serving one process
d. None of the above
7. Remote procedure call (RPC) is used by an application execute
a. To execute a procedure in the system
b. To execute a procedure in another compute in the distributed system
c. Name of a software
d. None of the above
8. A distributed transaction is also called
a. Single-site transaction
b. Two –site transaction
c. Multi-site transaction
d. Both (a) & (b)
9. File control block (FCB) contains all information concerning
a. A file processing activity
b. Execution activity
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. None of the above
10. Non-uniform memory architecture system consists of number of nodes and each node consists
a. Monitor
b. Register
c. Both (a) & (b)
d. 1 or more C.P.Us
True & False:
1. CPU helps in effective memory management by an OS.
2. High reliability in distributed file systems can be ensured through sharing semantics.
3. The compatible time sharing system for the IBM 7094 was one of the first time sharing systems.
4. The Processors of multiprocessors are divide into processor sets.
5. A resource rank is associated with each resource class.
6. A cached directory is a copy of directory that exists at a primary site.
7. A cluster of nodes is a section of the distributed system that contains sufficient hardware and software resources.
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
8. A cycle is a sufficient condition for a deadlock in MISR system
9. File system integrity implies correctness and consistency of control data and operations of the file system.
10. A mathematical model consists of three components model of the server
Section B: Short Questions (20 marks)
 This section consists of Short Questions (Answer should be in 5 Line).
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Question is of 5 marks.
1. What do you mean by “Authentication”?
2. Distinguish between File System and IOCS.
3. Define “Segmentation with Paging”.
4. Describe the Deadlock characteristics for different resource system.
Section C: Long Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Long Questions (Word Limit 100 words)
 Each question carries 10 marks.
 Attempt any three Questions.
1. Write a Short Note on “Structure of an Operating System”.
2. Define Request-Reply-Acknowledgement Protocol and Explain a Blocking version of RRA Protocol.
3. Explain how starvation is avoided the UNIX and Window system?
4. Discuss influence of disk scheduling algorithms on effectiveness of I/O buffering?
END OF SECTION B
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Information System Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section D: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the Questions
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200 to 250 words).
1. Describe why authentication is important for file protection?
2. Show actions of the basic and control parts of a process to important Ricart-Agrawala Algorithm?
S-2-301012
END OF SECTION D
END OF SECTION C


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IIBM ONGOING EXAM ANSWER
CONTACT: DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Human Resource Management
Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of
those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the
position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA FIRST SEMESTER EXAM ANSWER SHEET

MARKETING MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA FIRST SEMESTER EXAM ANSWER SHEET PROVIDED WHATSAPP 91 9924764558
Marketing Management
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of multiple choices & short answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Part One carries I mark each & Part II carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a concept where goods are produced without taking into consideration the choices or tastes of
customers.
a. Marketing mix
b. Production concept
c. Marketing concept
d. Relationship marketing
2. It involves individuals who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or
resale.
a. Environment analysis
b. Macro environment
c. Micro environment
d. Consumer
3. It is the groups of people who interact formally or informally influencing each other‟s attitudes&
behavior.
a. Consumer behavior
b. Culture
c. Reference groups
d. Primary groups
4. The concept of the product that passes through various changes in its total life known as:
a. Product life cycle
b. Line stretching
c. Consumer adoption
d. Product
5. It refers to unique set of brand associations that brand strategist aspires to create or maintain:
a. Branding
b. Packaging
c. Brand identity
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
d. Brand image
6. It involves a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or
service.
a. Promotional pricing
b. Price discrimination
c. Non price competition
d. None of the above
7. It refers to an arrangement where another company through its own marketing channel sells the
products of one producers.
a. End customer
b. Wholesaler
c. Retailing
d. Strategic channel alliance
8. It involves facility consisting of the means & equipments necessary for the movement of
passengers of goods.
a. Logistics
b. Warehousing
c. Transportation
d. None of the above
9. The advertising which is used to inform consumers about a new product or feature & to build
primary demands is known as:
a. Advertising
b. Informative advertising
c. Persuasive advertising
d. Advertising strategy
10. An art that predicts the likelihood of economic activity on the basis of certain assumptions:
a. Compensation
b. Sales forecasting
c. Sales budgeting
d. Selling policy
Part Two:
1. Define Marketing Mix.
2. Discuss the concept of Benchmarking.
3. Write a short note on Target Marketing.
4. What do you understand by Pricing Strategy?
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150 to 200 words).
Caselet 1
Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company
that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories
under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona
employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly
announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.
Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally,
common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s
wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The
concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping
experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an
investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing
campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and
five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange
happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were
women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to
include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in
1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi
and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit
customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that
organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground
rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how
the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an
outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign
retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail
companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the
world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.
Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the
store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was
trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail
management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was
internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management
institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even
restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the
latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive
membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by
invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest
names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai
and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted
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surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house
wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving
and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase,
walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch
and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to
pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over.
Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The
company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to
the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families,
kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry
the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The inhouse
wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to
work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop
lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable
designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and
Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations,
though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s
wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).
Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have
been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money
customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands
plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its
in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing
brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all
brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the
company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith
in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With
60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the
turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let
such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor)
in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the
shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole
experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique
manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text –
or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers
having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a
pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to
the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the
product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special
care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it
all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it
has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there
was extra space of 67,000 sq. ft. Carrying the perfect experience to the shop floor is an attempt to
stack goods in vast open spaces neatly. Every store has a generic structure, though regional customer
variances are accounted for. Each store is on lease, and this is clearly Shoppers‟ Stop‟s most
expensive resource proposition – renting huge spaces in prime properties across metros, so far
totaling 210,000 sq. ft of retail space. Getting that space was easy enough for Shoppers‟ Stop, since
its promoter is the Mumbai-based Raheja Group, which also owns 62 per cent of the share capital.
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Questions:
1. What are the significant factors that have led to the success of Shoppers‟ Stop?
2. How should Shoppers‟ Stop develop its demand forecasts?
Caselet 2
The rise of personal computers in the mid 1980s spurred interest in computer games. This caused a
crash in home Video game market. Interest in Video games was rekindled when a number of different
companies developed hardware consoles that provided graphics superior to the capabilities of
computer games. By 1990, the Nintendo Entertainment System dominated the product category. Sega
surpassed Nintendo when it introduced its Genesis System. By 1993, Sega commanded almost 60 per
cent of Video game market and was one of the most recognized brand names among the children.
Sega‟s success was short lived. In 1995, Saturn (a division of General Motors) launched a new 32-bit
system. The product was a miserable failure for a number of reasons. Sega was the primary software
developer for Saturn and it did not support efforts by outside game developers to design compatible
games. In addition, Sega‟s games were often delivered quite late to retailers. Finally, the price of the
Saturn system was greater than other comparable game consoles. This situation of Saturn‟s misstep
benefited Nintendo and Sony greatly. Sony‟s Play Station was unveiled in 1994 and was available in
70 million homes worldwide by the end of 1999. Its “Open design” encouraged the efforts of outside
developers, resulting in almost 3,000 different games that were compatible with the PlayStation. It too
featured 32-bit graphics that appealed to older audience. As a result, at one time, more than 30 per
cent of PlayStation owners were over 30 years old. Nintendo 64 was introduced in 1996 and had eyepopping
64-bit graphics and entered in more than 28 million homes by 1999. Its primary users were
between the age of 6 and 13 as a result of Nintendo‟s efforts to limit the amount of violent and adultoriented
material featured on games that can be played on its systems. Because the company
exercised considerable control over software development, Nintendo 64 had only one-tenth the
number of compatible games as Sony‟s PlayStation did. By 1999, Sony had captured 56 per cent of
the video game market, followed by Nintendo with 42 per cent. Sega‟s share had fallen to a low of
1%. Hence, Sega had two options, either to concede defeat or introduce an innovative video machine
that would bring in huge sales. And Sega had to do so before either Nintendo or Sony could bring
their next-generation console to market. The Sega Dreamcast arrived in stores in September 1999
with an initial price tag of $199. Anxious gamers placed 300,000 advance orders, and initial sales
were quite encouraging. A total of 1.5 million Dreamcast machines were bought within the first four
months, and initial reviews were positive. The 128-bit system was capable of generating 3-D visuals,
and 40 different games were available within three months of Dream cast‟s introduction. By the end
of the year, Sega had captured a market share to 15 per cent. But the Dreamcast could not sustain its
momentum. Although its game capabilities were impressive, the system did not deliver all the
functionality Sega had promised. A 56K modem (which used a home phone line) and a Web browser
were meant to allow access to the Internet so that gamers could play each other online, surf the Web,
and visit the Dreamcast Network for product information and playing tips. Unfortunately, these
features either were not immediately available or were disappointing in their execution. Sega was not
the only one in having the strategy of adding functionality beyond games. Sony and Nintendo
followed the same approach for their machines introduced in 1999. Both Nintendo‟s Neptune and
Sony‟s PlayStation 2 (PS2) were built on a DVD platform and featured a 128-bit processor. Analysts
applauded the move to DVD because it is less expensive to produce and allows more storage than
CDs. It also gives buyers the ability to use the machine as CD music player and DVD movie player.
As Sony marketing director commented, “The full entertainment offering from Play Station 2
definitely appeals to a much broader audience. I have friends in their 30s who bought it not only
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
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IIBM Institute of Business Management
because it‟s a gaming system for their kids, but also a DVD for them.” In addition, PlayStation 2 is
able to play games developed for its earlier model that was CD-based. This gives the PS2 an
enormous advantage in the number of compatible game titles that were immediately available to
gamers. Further enhancing the PS2‟s appeal is its high-speed modem and allows the user‟s easy
access to the Internet through digital cable as well as over telephone lines. This gives Sony the ability
to distribute movies, music, and games directly to PS2 consoles. “We are positioning this as an allround
entertainment player,” commented Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment.
However, some prospective customers were put off by the console‟s initial price of $360. Shortly
after the introduction of Neptune, Nintendo changed its strategies and announced the impending
release of its newest game console, The GameCube. However, unlike the Neptune, the GameCube
would not run on a DVD platform and also would not initially offer any online capabilities. It would
be more attractively priced at $199. A marketing vice president for Nintendo explained the
company‟s change in direction, “We are the only competitor whose business is video games. We want
to create the best gaming system.” Nintendo also made the GameCube friendly for outside developers
and started adding games that included sports titles to attract an older audience. Best known for its
extra ordinary successes with games aimed at the younger set, such as Donkey Kong, Super Mario
Bros, and Pokemon, Nintendo sought to attract older users, especially because the average video
game player is 28. Youthful Nintendo users were particularly pleased to hear that they could use their
handheld Game Boy Advance systems as controllers for the GameCube. Nintendo scrambled to
ensure there would be an adequate supply of Game Cubes on the date in November 2001, when they
were scheduled to be available to customers. It also budgeted $450 million to market its new product,
as it anticipated stiff competition during the holiday shopping season. With more than 20 million
PlayStation 2 sold worldwide, the GameCube as a new entry in the video game market would make
the battle for market share even more intense. For almost a decade, the video game industry had only
Sega, Nintendo, and Sony; just three players. Because of strong brand loyalty and high product
development costs, newcomers faced a daunting task in entering this race and being competitive. In
November 2001, Microsoft began selling its new Xbox, just three days before the GameCube made
its debut. Some observers felt the Xbox was aimed to rival PlayStation 2, which has similar functions
that rival Microsoft‟s Web TV system and even some lower level PCs. Like the Sony‟s PlayStation 2,
Xbox was also built using a DVD platform, but it used an Intel processor in its construction. This
open design allowed Microsoft to develop the Xbox in just two years, and gave developers the option
of using standard PC tool for creating compatible games. In addition, Microsoft also sought the
advice of successful game developers and even incorporated some of their feedback into the design of
the console and its controllers. As a result of developers‟ efforts, Microsoft had about 20 games ready
when the Xbox became available. By contrast, the GameCube had only eight games available.
Microsoft online strategy was another feature that differentiated of the Xbox from the GameCube.
Whereas Nintendo had no immediate plans for Web-based play, the Xbox came equipped with an
Ethernet port for broadband access to Internet. Microsoft also announced its own Web-based network
on which gamers can come together for online head-to head play and for organized online matches
and tournaments. Subscribers to this service were to pay a small monthly fee and must have highspeed
access to the Internet. This is a potential drawback considering that a very low percentage of
households world over currently have broadband connections. By contrast Sony promoted an open
network, which allows software developers to manage their own games, including associated fees
charged to users. However, interested players must purchase a network adapter for an additional
$39.99. Although game companies are not keen on the prospect of submitting to the control of a
Microsoft-controlled network, it would require a significant investment for them to manage their own
service on the Sony-based network. Initially the price of Microsoft‟s Xbox was $299. Prior to the
introduction of Xbox, in a competitive move Sony dropped the price of the PlayStation 2 to $299.
Nintendo‟s GameCube already enjoyed a significant price advantage, as it was selling for $100 less
than either Microsoft or Sony products. Gamers eagerly snapped up the new consoles and made 2001
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
7
IIBM Institute of Business Management
the best year ever for video game sales. For the first time, consumers spent $9.4 billion on video
game equipment, which was more than they did at the box office. By the end of 2001 holiday season,
6.6 million PlayStation 2 consoles had been sold in North America alone, followed by 1.5 million
Xbox units and 1.2 million Game Cubes. What ensued was an all out price war. This started when
Sony decided to put even more pressure on the Microsoft‟s Xbox by cutting the PlayStation 2 price to
$199. Microsoft quickly matched that price.
Wanting to maintain its low-price status, Nintendo in turn responded by reducing the price of its the
GameCube by $50, to $149. By mid 2002, Microsoft Xbox had sold between 3.5 and 4 million units
worldwide. However, Nintendo had surpassed Xbox sales by selling 4.5 million Game Cubes. Sony
had the benefit of healthy head start, and had shipped 32 million PlayStation 2s. However, seven
years after the introduction of original PlayStation, it was being sold in retail outlets for a mere $49. It
had a significant lead in terms of numbers of units in homes around the world with a 43 per cent
share. Nintendo 64 was second with 30 per cent, followed by Sony PlayStation 2 with 14 per cent.
The Xbox and GameCube each claimed about 3 per cent of the market, with Sega Dreamcast
comprising the last and least market share of 4.7 per cent. Sega, once an industry leader, announced in
2001 that it had decided to stop producing the Dreamcast and other video game hardware
components. The company said it would develop games for its competitors‟ consoles. Thus Sega
slashed the price of the Dreamcast to just $99 in an effort to liquidate its piled up inventory of more
than 2 million units and immediately began developing 11 new games for the Xbox, four for
PlayStation 2, and three for Nintendo‟s Game Boy Advance. As the prices of video game consoles
have dropped, consoles and games have become the equivalent of razors and blades. This means the
consoles generate little if any profit, but the games are a highly profitable proposition. The profit
margins on games are highly attractive, affected to some degree by whether the content is developed
by the console maker (such as Sony) or by an independent game publisher (such as Electronic Arts).
Thus, the competition to develop appealing, or perhaps even addictive, games may be even more
intense than the battle among players to produce the best console. In particular, Nintendo, Sony, and
Microsoft want games that are exclusive to their own systems. With that in mind, they not only rely
on large in-house staffs that design games but they also pay added fees to independent publishers for
exclusive rights to new games. The sales of video games in 2001 rose to 43 per cent, compared to just
4 per cent increase for computer-based games. But computer game players are believed to be a loyal
bunch, as they see many advantages in playing games on their computers rather than consoles. For
one thing, they have a big advantage of having access to a mouse and a keyboard that allow them to
play far more sophisticated games. In addition, they have been utilizing the Internet for years to
receive game updates and modifications and to play each other over the Web. Sony and Microsoft are
intent on capturing a portion of the online gaming opportunity. Even Nintendo has decided to make
available a modem that will allow GameCube users to play online. As prices continue to fall and
technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it remains to be seen whether these three
companies can keep their names on the industry‟s list of “high scorers”.
Questions:
1. Considering the concept of product life cycle, where would you put video games in their life cycle?
2. Should video game companies continue to alter their products to include other functions, such as
email?
END OF SECTION B
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
8
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of Applied Theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 200-250 words).
1. What do you understand by product life cycle? Discuss implications and limitations of product
life cycle concept.
2. Describe role of marketing channels. List the different types of marketing channels.
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IIBM MBA FIRST SEMESTER EXAM ANSWER SHEET

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Human Resource Management
Subject Code-B102
Section A: Objective Type & Short Questions (30 marks)
 This section consists of Multiple Choice and Short Answer type questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Objective Question carries 1 mark each &Short Question carries 5 marks each.
Part One
Multiple Choices:
1. It is a cultural attitude marked by the tendency to regard one’s own culture as superior to others
a. Geocentrism
b. Polycentrism
c. Ethnocentrism
d. Egocentrism
2. It is the systemic study of job requirements & those factors that influence the performance of
those job requirements
a. Job analysis
b. Job rotation
c. Job circulation
d. Job description
3. This Act provides an assistance for minimum statutory wages for scheduled employment
a. Payment of Wages Act, 1936
b. Minimum Wages Act, 1948
c. Factories Act, 1948
d. Payment of Gratuity act, 1972
4. __________ is the actual posting of an employee to a specific job
a. Induction
b. Placement
c. Attrition
d. None
5. Broadening an individual’s knowledge, skills & abilities for future responsibilities is known as
a. Training
b. Development
c. Education
d. Mentoring
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
2
IIBM Institute of Business Management
6. Change that is designed and implemented in an orderly and timely fashion in anticipation of
future events
a. Planned change
b. Technology change
c. Structural change
d. None
7. It is a process for setting goals and monitoring progress towards achieving those goals
a. Performance appraisal
b. Performance gap
c. Performance factor
d. Performance management system
8. A method which requires the rates to provide a subjective performance evaluation along a scale
from low to high
a. Assessment centre
b. Checklist
c. Rating scale
d. Monitoring
9. It is the sum of knowledge, skills, attitudes, commitment, values and the liking of the people in an
organization
a. Human resources
b. Personal management
c. Human resource management
d. Productivity
10. A learning exercise representing a real-life situation where trainees compete with each other to
achieve specific objectives
a. Executive development
b. Management game
c. Programmed learning
d. Understudy
Part Two:
1. What is the importance of Career Planning in industry?
2. List the various features of HRM.
3. How can you explain the concept of Performance Appraisal?
4. Differentiate between on- the- job and off- the- job training.
END OF SECTION A
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
3
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Section B: Caselets (40 marks)
 This section consists of Caselets.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each Caselet carries 20 marks.
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.
END OF SECTION B
Section C: Applied Theory (30 marks)
 This section consists of applied theory Questions.
 Answer all the questions.
 Each question carries 15 marks
 Detailed information should form the part of your answer (Word limit 150-200 words).
1. Several types of interviews are commonly used depending on the nature & importance of the
position to be filled within an organization. Explain the different types of Interviews.
2. How would you explain Organizational Change and Development?
END OF SECTION C
S-2-250613


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MBA IIBM EXAM 2018 CASE STUDY ANSWER PROVIDED

CONTACT:
DR. PRASANTH MBA PH.D. DME MOBILE / WHATSAPP: +91 9924764558 OR +91 9447965521 EMAIL: prasanththampi1975@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.casestudyandprojectreports.com

Caselet 1
Uptron Electronics Limited, is a pioneering and internationally reputed firm in the electronics
industry. It is one of the largest firm in the country. It attracted employees from internationallyreputed
institute and industries by offering high salaries, perks, etc. It has advertized for the position
of an electronic engineer recently. Nearly 150 candidates applied for the jobMr. Sashidhar, an
electronics Engineering Graduate from the Indian Institute Of Technology with 5 years working
experience in a medium sized electronics firm, was selected from among the 130 candidates who took
tests and interview. The interview board recommended an enhancement in his salary by Rs 5,000
more than his present salary at his request. Mr Sashidhar was very happy to achieve this and he was
congratulated by a number of people including his previous employer for his brilliant interview
performance, and wished him good luck.
Mr Sashidhar joined Uptyron Electronics Ltd., on 21st January, 2002, with greater enthusiasm. He
also found his job to be quite comfortable and a challenging one and he felt it was prestigious to work
with this company during the formative years of his career. He found his superiors as well as
subordinates to be friendly and cooperative. But this climate did not live long. After one year of his
service, he slowly learnt about a number of unpleasant stories about the company, management, the
superior subordinate relations, rate of employee turnover, especially at higher level But he decided to
stay on as he has promised several things to the management in the interview. He wanted to please
and change the attitude of management through his diligent performance, firm commitment and
dedication. He started maximizing his contributions and the management got the impression that Mr.
Sashidhar had settled down and will remain in the company.
After some time, the superiors started riding rough- shod over Mr Sashidhar. He was overloaded with
multifarious jobs. His freedom in deciding and executing was cut down. He was ill treated on a
number of occasions before his subordinates. His colleagues also started assigning their
responsibilities to Mr Sashidhar. Consequently there were imbalances in his family life and
organizational life. But he seemed to be calm and contented. Management felt that Mr Sashidhar had
the potential to bear with many more organizational responsibilities.
So the general manager was quite surprised to see the resignation letter of Mr Sashidhar along with a
cheque equivalent to a month’s salary one fine morning on 18th January, 2004. The General Manager
failed to convince Mr Sashidhar to withdraw his resignation. The General Manager relieved him on
25th January, 2004. The General Manager wanted to appoint a committee to go into the matter
immediately, but dropped the idea later.
Questions:
1. What is wrong with the recruitment policy of the company?
2. Why did Mr. Sashidhar’s resignation surprise the General Manager?
Examination Paper of Human Resource Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
Caselet 2
The contexts in which human resources are managed in today’s organizations are constantly,
changing. No longer do firms utilize one set of manufacturing processes, employ a homogeneous
group of loyal employees for long periods of time or develop one set way of structuring how work is
done and supervisory responsibility is assigned. Continuous changes in who organizations employ
and what these employees do require HR practices and systems that are well conceived and
effectively implemented to ensure high performance and continued success.
1. Automated technologies nowadays require more technically trained employees possessing
multifarious skills to repair, adjust or improve existing processes. The firms can’t expect these
employees (Gen X employees, possessing superior technical knowledge and skills, whose attitudes
and perceptions toward work are significantly different from those of their predecessor organizations:
like greater self control, less interest in job security; no expectations of long term employment;
greater participation urge in work activities, demanding opportunities for personal growth and
creativity) to stay on without attractive compensation packages and novel reward schemes.
2. Technology driven companies are led by project teams, possessing diverse skills, experience and
expertise. Flexible and dynamic organizational structures are needed to take care of the expectations
of managers, technicians and analysts who combine their skills, expertise and experience to meet
changing customer needs and competitive pressures.
3. Cost cutting efforts have led to the decimation of unwanted layers in organizational hierarchy in
recent times. This, in turn, has brought in the problem of managing plateau employees whose careers
seem to have been hit by the delivering process. Organizations are, therefore, made to find alternative
career paths for such employees’
4. Both young and old workers, these days, have values and attitudes that stress less loyalty to the
company and more loyalty to oneself and one’s career than those shown by employees in the past,
Organizations, therefore, have to devise appropriate HR policies and strategies so as to prevent the
flight of talented employees
Question:-
1. Discuss that technological breakthrough has brought radical changes in HRM.

Caselet 1
Ask the company top brass what „almost there‟ means. The answer: a premier Indian retail company
that has come to be known as a specialty chain of apparel and accessories. With 52 product categories
under one roof, Shoppers‟ Stop has a line-up of 350 brands. Set up and headed by former Corona
employee, B. S. Nagesh, Shoppers‟ Stop is India‟s answer to Selfridges and Printemps. As it proudly
announces, „We don‟t sell, we help you buy.‟ Back in 1991, there was the question of what to retail.
Should it be a supermarket or a departmental store? Even an electronics store was considered. Finally,
common sense and understanding won out. The safest bet, for the all-male team was to retail men‟s
wear. They knew the male psyche and felt that they had discerning taste in men‟s clothing. The
concept would be that of a lifestyle store in a luxurious space, which would make for a great shopping
experience. The first Shoppers‟ Stop store took shape in Andheri, Mumbai, in October 1991, with an
investment of nearly Rs. 20 lakh. The original concept that formed the basis of a successful marketing
campaign for seven years is here to stay. And the result is an annual turnover of Rs. 160 crores and
five stores, nine years later. Everything went right from the beginning, except for one strange
happening. More than 60 per cent of the customers who walked into Shoppers‟ Stop in Mumbai were
women. This gave rise to ideas. Soon, the store set up its women‟s section. Later, it expanded to
include children‟s wear and then, household accessories. The second store in Bangalore came in
1995. The store at Hyderabad followed in 1998 with the largest area of 60,000 sq. ft. The New Delhi
and Jaipur stores were inaugurated in 1999. All this while, the product range kept increasing to suit
customer needs. The most recent experiment was home furnishings. Secure in the knowledge that
organized retailing in global brands was still in its infancy in India, Shoppers‟ Stop laid the ground
rules which the competition followed. The biggest advantage for Shoppers‟ Stop is that it knows how
the Indian consumer thinks and feels while shopping. Yes, feeling – for in India, shopping remains an
outing. And how does it compare itself to foreign stores? While it is not modeled on any one foreign
retailer, the „basic construct‟ is taken from the experience of a number of successfully managed retail
companies. It has leveraged expertise for a critical component like technology from all over the
world, going as far as hiring expatriates from Littlewoods and using state-of-the-art ERP models.
Shoppers‟ Stop went a step further by even integrating its financial system with the ERP model.
Expertise was imported wherever it felt that expertise available in-house was inadequate. But the
store felt there was one acute problem. A shortage of the most important resource of them all was
trained humans. Since Indian business institutes did not have professional courses in retail
management, people were hired from different walks of life and the training programme was
internalized. By 1994, the senior executives at Shoppers‟ Stop were taking lectures at management
institutes in Mumbai. The Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS) even
restructured its course to include retail management as a subject. Getting the company access to the
latest global retail trends and exchange of information with business greats was an exclusive
membership to the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores (IGDS). It allows membership by
invitation to one company from a country and Shoppers‟ Stop rubs shoulders with 29 of the hottest
names in retailing – Selfridges from the UK, C.K. Tang from Singapore, Lamcy Plaza from Dubai
and the like. With logistics I in place, the accent moved to the customer. Shoppers‟ Stop conducted
Examination Paper of Marketing Management
4
IIBM Institute of Business Management
surveys with ORG-MARG and Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB) and undertook in-house
wardrobe audits. The studies confirmed what it already knew. The Indian customer is still evolving
and is very different from, say, a European customer, who knows exactly what he wants to purchase,
walks up to a shelf, picks up the merchandise, pays and walks out. In India, customers like to touch
and feel the merchandise, and scout for options. Also, the majority of Indian shoppers still prefer to
pay in cash. So, transactions must be in cash as against plastic money used the world over.
Additionally, the Indian customer likes being served – whether it is food, or otherwise. The
company‟s customer profile includes people who want the same salesperson each time they came to
the store to walk them through the shop floors and assist in the purchase. Others came with families,
kids and maids in tow and expected to be suitably attended to. Still others wanted someone to carry
the bags. So, the shops have self-help counters, with an assistant at hand for queries or help. The inhouse
wardrobe audit also helped with another facet of the business. It enabled Shoppers‟ Stop to
work out which brands to stock, based on customer preferences. In fact, the USP of Shoppers‟ Stop
lies in judiciously selected global brands, displayed alongside an in-house range of affordable
designer wear. The line-up includes Levi‟s, Louis Philippe, Allen Solly, Walt Disney, Ray Ban and
Reebok, besides in-house labels STOP and I. Brand selection is the same across the five locations,
though the product mix may be somewhat city-based to accommodate cuts and styles in women‟s
wear, as well as allowing for seasonal variations (winter in Delhi, for instance, is a case in point).
Stocking of brands is based on popular demand – recently, Provogue, MTV Style, and Benetton have
been added. In-house labels are available at competitive prices and target the value-for-money
customer and make up around 12 per cent of Shoppers‟ Stop‟s business. Sometimes in-house brands
plug the price gap in certain product categories. To cash in on this, the company has big plans for its
in-house brands: from re-branding to repositioning, to homing in on product categories where existing
brands are not strong. Competition between brands is not an issue, because being a trading house, all
brands get equal emphasis. The in-house brand shopper is one who places immense trust in the
company and the quality of its goods and returns for repeat buys. And the company reposed its faith
in regular customers by including them in a concept called the First Citizen‟s Club (FCC). With
60,000 odd members, FCC customers account for 10 per cent of entries and for 34 per cent of the
turnover. It was the sheer appeal of the experience that kept pulling these people back. Not one to let
such an opportunity pass, the company ran a successful ad campaign (that talks about just this factor)
in print for more than eight years. The theme is still the same. In 1999, a TV spot, which liked the
shopping experience to the slowing down of one‟s internal clock and the beauty of the whole
experience, was aired. More recently, ads that spell out the store‟s benefits (in a highly oblique
manner) are being aired.
The campaign is based on entries entered in the Visitors‟ Book. None of the ads has a visual or text –
or any heavy handedly direct reference to the store or the merchandise. The ads only show shoppers
having the time of their lives in calm and serene locales, or elements that make shopping at the store a
pleasure – quite the perfect getaway for a cosmopolitan shopper aged between 25 and 45. The brief to
the agency, Contract, ensured that brand recall came in terms of the shopping experience, not the
product. And it has worked wonders. Value-addition at each store also comes in the form of special
care with car parks, power backup, customer paging, alteration service and gift-wrapping. To top it
all, cafes and coffee bars make sure that the customer does not step out of the store. In Hyderabad, it
has even created a Food Court. Although the food counter was not planned, it came about as there
was extra space of 6